Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics Radio

freakonomics.com
Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. Special features include series like “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.” as well as a live game show, “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.”


397. How to Save $32 Million in One Hour
Nov 13 • 45 min
For nearly a decade, governments have been using behavioral nudges to solve problems — and the strategy is catching on in healthcare, firefighting, and policing. But is that thinking too small? Could nudging be used to fight income inequality and achieve…
396. Why Does Tipping Still Exist?
Nov 6 • 47 min
It’s an acutely haphazard way of paying workers, and yet it keeps expanding. We dig into the data to find out why.
395. Speak Softly and Carry Big Data
Oct 30 • 63 min
Do economic sanctions work? Are big democracies any good at spreading democracy? What is the root cause of terrorism? It turns out that data analysis can help answer all these questions — and make better foreign-policy decisions. Guests include former…
394. Does Hollywood Still Have a Princess Problem?
Oct 23 • 50 min
For decades, there’s been a huge gender disparity both on-screen and behind the scenes. But it seems like cold, hard data — with an assist from the actor Geena Davis — may finally be moving the needle.
393. Can Britain Get Its “Great” Back?
Oct 16 • 60 min
It used to be a global capital of innovation, invention, and exploration. Now it’s best known for its messy European divorce. We visit London to see if the British spirit of discovery is still alive. Guests include the mayor of London, undersea explorers,…
392. The Prime Minister Who Cried Brexit
Oct 9 • 52 min
In 2016, David Cameron held a referendum on whether the U.K. should stay in the European Union. A longtime Euroskeptic, he nevertheless led the Remain campaign. So what did Cameron really want? We ask him that and much more — including why he left office…
391. America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up
Oct 2 • 45 min
Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead have kids learn what they really need in the modern era: data fluency.
390. Fed Up
Sep 26 • 41 min
Mary Daly rose from high-school dropout to president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She thinks the central bank needs an upgrade too. It starts with recognizing that the economy is made up of actual humans.
389. How to Make Meetings Less Terrible
Sep 18 • 41 min
In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.
358. Yes, the Open Office Is Terrible — But It Doesn’t Have to Be (Rebroadcast)
Sep 11 • 41 min
It began as a post-war dream for a more collaborative and egalitarian workplace. It has evolved into a nightmare of noise and discomfort. Can the open office be saved, or should we all just be working from home?
388. The Economics of Sports Gambling
Sep 4 • 54 min
What happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? We’re about to find out. A recent Supreme Court decision has cleared the way to bring an estimated $300 billion in black-market sports betting…
367. The Future of Meat (Rebroadcast)
Aug 28 • 53 min
Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these two forces be possible — or, even better, Impossible™?
359. Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s? (Rebroadcast)
Aug 21 • 47 min
The quirky little grocery chain with California roots and German ownership has a lot to teach all of us about choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and team spirit.