New Books in History

New Books in History

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Interviews with Historians about their New Books


J. Browning and T. Silver, “An Environmental History of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2020)
Aug 6 • 59 min
This sweeping new history recognizes that the Civil War was not just a military conflict but also a moment of profound transformation in Americans’ relationship to the natural world. To be sure, environmental factors such as topography and weather…
John C. McManus, “Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton Caliber, 2019)
Aug 6 • 72 min
For most Americans, the war the United States waged in the Pacific in the Second World War was one fought primarily by the Navy and the Marine Corps. As John C. McManus demonstrates in Fire and Fortitude: The US Army in the Pacific War, 1941-1943 (Dutton…
Donna Drucker, “Contraception: A Concise History” (The MIT Press, 2020)
Aug 6 • 25 min
The beginning of the modern contraceptive era began in 1882, when Dr. Aletta Jacobs opened the first birth control clinic in Amsterdam. The founding of this facility, and the clinical provision of contraception that it enabled, marked the moment when…
David Tavárez, “Words and Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America” (U Colorado Press, 2017)
Aug 6 • 89 min
Professor David Tavárez’s edited volume, Words & Worlds Turned Around: Indigenous Christianities in Colonial Latin America (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 2017), is a collection of eleven essays from historians and anthropologists grappling with…
W. J. Perry and T. Z. Collina, “The Button: The New Nuclear Arms Race and Presidential Power from Truman to Trump” (BenBella Books, 2020)
Aug 6 • 49 min
As we enter the third decade of the 21st century, American nuclear policy continues to be influenced by the legacies of the Cold War. Nuclear policies remain focused on easily identifiable threats, including China or Russia, and how the United States…
Alex Sayf Cummings, “Brain Magnet: Research Triangle Park and the Idea of the Idea Economy” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Aug 5 • 38 min
Beginning in the 1950s, a group of academics, businesspeople, and politicians set out on an ambitious project to remake North Carolina’s low-wage economy. They pitched the universities of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill as the kernel of a tech hub,…
Thomas Richards Jr., “Breakaway Americas: The Unmanifest Future of Jacksonian America” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2020)
Aug 5 • 64 min
In Breakaway Americas: The Unmanifest Future of Jacksonian America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020), Thomas Richards Jr., a history teacher at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, argues that the map of North America was not preordained. Richards uses…
Nozomi Naoi, “Yumeji Modern: Designing the Everyday in Twentieth-Century Japan” (U Washington Press, 2020)
Aug 5 • 80 min
Nozomi Naoi’s Yumeji Modern: Designing the Everyday in Twentieth-Century Japan (University of Washington Press, 2020) is the first book-length English-language study of one of Japan’s iconic twentieth-century artists, Takehisa Yumeji (1884–1934). While he…
Samuel Morris Brown, “Joseph Smith’s Translation: The Words and Worlds of Early Mormonism” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Aug 5 • 56 min
Mormonism’s founder, Joseph Smith, claimed to have translated ancient scriptures. He dictated an American Bible from metal plates reportedly buried by ancient Jews in a nearby hill, and produced an Egyptian “Book of Abraham” derived from funerary papyri…
Natalia Milanesio, “¡Destape! Sex, Democracy, and Freedom in Postdictatorial Argentina” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
Aug 5 • 64 min
Under dictatorship in Argentina, sex and sexuality were regulated to the point where sex education, explicit images, and even suggestive material were prohibited. With the return to democracy in 1983, Argentines experienced new freedoms, including sexual…
Nyasha Junior, “Reimagining Hagar: Blackness and Bible” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Aug 5 • 50 min
Popular culture helps shape how audiences imagine Biblical personalities in our contemporary moment. For many, Warner Sallman’s portrait of Jesus fixes him as white, others envision Moses as Charlton Heston because of Cecil B. DeMille’s film, The Ten…
A Very Square Peg: A Podcast Series about Polymath Robert Eisler. Episode 9: Vanity of Vanities
Aug 4 • 59 min
In this episode, I look at Eisler’s last days in England, where he found that the Oxford readership he had been promised before being sent to Dachau was taken by someone else, a paper shortage had put a stop to academic publishing, and that foreign Jews…
Anton Howes, “Arts and Minds: How the Royal Society of Arts Changed a Nation” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Aug 4 • 68 min
Over the past 300 years, The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce has tried to improve British life in every way imaginable. It has sought to influence education, commerce, music, art, architecture, communications, food,…
Anne Lindsay, “Reconsidering Interpretation of Heritage Sites: America in the Eighteenth Century” (Routledge, 2020)
Aug 4 • 67 min
2020 had been an intense year for Americans reflecting on their nation’s history. From attacks on statues to public debates about the 1619 Project to the release of Hamilton on a streaming service, Americans have been taking a hard look at how the history…
Gaurav Desai, “Commerce with the Universe: Africa, India, and the Afrasian Imagination” (Columbia UP, 2013)
Aug 3 • 79 min
Gaurav Desai’s Commerce with the Universe: Africa, India, and the Afrasian Imagination (Columbia University Press, 2013), offers an alternative history of East Africa in the Indian Ocean world. Reading the life narratives and literary texts of South…
Melissa J. Wilde, “Birth Control Battles: How Race and Class Divided American Religion” (U California Press, 2020)
Aug 3 • 65 min
Although it has largely been erased from the collective memory of American Christianity, the debate over eugenics was a major factor in the history of 20th-century religious movements, with many churches actively supporting the pseudoscience as a…
Mari K. Webel, “The Politics of Disease Control: Sleeping Sickness in Eastern Africa, 1890-1920” (Ohio UP, 2019)
Aug 3 • 80 min
In The Politics of Disease Control. Sleeping Sickness in Eastern Africa, 1890-1920 (Ohio University Press, 2019), Mari K. Webel tells a history of colonial interventions among three communities of the Great Lakes region of East Africa. At the dawn of the…
Charlton D. McIlwain, “Black Software: The Internet and Racial Justice, from AfroNet to Black Lives Matter” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Aug 3 • 51 min
In Black Software: The Internet and Racial Justice, from AfroNet to Black Lives Matter (Oxford Univeristy Press), Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost for Faculty Engagement and Development and professor of media, culture, and communication at NYU’s Steinhardt…
Olivia Weisser, “ll Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England” (Yale UP, 2015)
Jul 31 • 42 min
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Olivia Weisser, Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts – Boston, to talk about her 2015 Yale University Press release, Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in…
Paula Fredriksen, “When Christians Were Jews: The First Generation” (Yale UP, 2018)
Jul 31 • 68 min
How did a group of charismatic, apocalyptic Jewish missionaries, working to prepare their world for the impending realization of God’s promises to Israel, end up inaugurating a movement that would grow into the gentile church? Committed to Jesus’s…
Sunny Stalter-Pace, “Imitation Artist: Gertrude Hoffman’s Life in Vaudeville and Dance” (Northwestern UP, 2020)
Jul 31 • 57 min
Gertrude Hoffman is one of many entertainers who were big stars in vaudeville before World War I, but whose celebrity faded as the American public was seduced by radio and film after the Great War. Sunny Stalter-Pace recounts Hoffmann’s groundbreaking…
Juan Pablo Scarfi, “The Hidden History of International Law in The Americas: Empires and Legal Networks” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Jul 30 • 61 min
In his book The Hidden History of International Law in The Americas: Empires and Legal Networks (Oxford University Press, 2017), Juan Pablo Scarfi shows the central role of a coterie of elite Latin American jurists and intellectuals in constructing a…
Sarah B. Rodriguez, “The Love Surgeon: A Story of Trust, Harm, and the Limits of Medical Regulation” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Jul 30 • 46 min
Dr. James Burt believed women’s bodies were broken, and only he could fix them. In the 1950s, this Ohio OB-GYN developed what he called “love surgery,” a unique procedure he maintained enhanced the sexual responses of a new mother, transforming her into…
Brett Dakin, “American Daredevil: Comics, Communism, and The Battles of Lev Gleason” (Chapterhouse Publishing, 2020)
Jul 30 • 48 min
In American Daredevil: Comics, Communism, and The Battles of Lev Gleason (Chapterhouse Publishing, 2020), Brett Dakin, Gleason’s great-nephew delves into the life of his famous relative. Gleason rose to the top of the comic publishing world during its…
Lindsay M. Chervinsky, “The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Jul 30 • 51 min
In her new book, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution (Harvard University Press, 2020), historian Lindsay M. Chervinsky traces the origins of the President’s cabinet in American government. Chervinsky combines the…
Ann Tucker, “Newest Born of Nations: European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy” (UVA Press, 2020)
Jul 29 • 31 min
From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the…
Rebecca E. Karl, “China’s Revolutions in the Modern World: A Brief Interpretive History” (Verso, 2020)
Jul 29 • 81 min
China’s emergence as a twenty-first-century global economic, cultural, and political power is often presented as a story of what Chinese leader Xi Jinping calls the nation’s “great rejuvenation,” a story narrated as the return of China to its “rightful”…
Sophie White, “Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana” (UNC Press, 2019)
Jul 29 • 76 min
In her prize-winning study Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Colonial Louisiana (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press, 2019), award-winning historian Sophie White…
Amity Shlaes, “Great Society: A New History” (Harper, 2019)
Jul 29 • 59 min
National concern about income inequalities. Race relations at a boiling point. Riots in the streets. Cries on the left for massive allocations of federal money for housing and poverty reduction programs. Social scientists and professional activists…
Pritipuspa Mishra, “Language and the Making of Modern India: Nationalism and the Vernacular in Colonial Odisha, 1803-1953” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 29 • 72 min
The province of Odisha, previously “Orissa,” was the first linguistically organized province of India. In Language and the Making of Modern India: Nationalism and the Vernacular in Colonial Odisha, 1803-1953 (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Pritipuspa…
Kevin J. Bryne, “Minstrel Traditions: Mediated Blackface in the Jazz Age” (Routledge, 2020)
Jul 29 • 67 min
The Blackface minstrel show is typically thought of a form tied to the 19th century. While the style was indeed developed during the Antebellum period, its history stretches well into 20th- and even 21st-century America. Far from being the endpoint…
Paulo Drinot, ”The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jul 29 • 61 min
Paulo Drinot’s The Sexual Question: A History of Prostitution in Peru, 1850s-1950s (Cambridge University Press, 2020), studies the interplay of sexuality, society, and the state in Peru in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drinot analyzes the rules…
JoAnna Poblete, “Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Samoa” (U Hawai’i Press, 2020)
Jul 28 • 67 min
In Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Samoa (University of Hawai’i Press, 2020), JoAnna Poblete demonstrates how western-style economics, policy-making, and knowledge building imposed by the U.S. federal government have been infused into…
Andrew Kettler, “The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jul 27 • 53 min
In his new book, The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Dr. Andrew Kettler charts the impact that smell had on the making of race and justifications for enslavement in the Atlantic world. Western…
Benjamin T. Smith, “The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940-1976: Stories from the Newsroom, Stories from the Street” (UNC Press, 2018)
Jul 27 • 51 min
Mexico today is one of the most dangerous places in the world to report the news, and Mexicans have taken to the street to defend freedom of expression. As Benjamin T. Smith demonstrates in his history of the press and civil society, The Mexican Press and…
Verónica Martínez-Matsuda, “Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp Program” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2020)
Jul 27 • 56 min
Verónica Martínez-Matsuda about her book Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp Program (University of Pennsylvania Press). Migrant Citizenship exams the Farm Security Administration’s Migratory Labor Camp Program, and…
James Renshaw, “In Search of the Romans” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Jul 27 • 73 min
James Renshaw modestly describes his interactive textbook, In Search of the Romans (Bloomsbury, 2019) as an attempt to bring his high school readers to a “base camp on Mount Everest and then hand them off to the Sherpas.” Renshaw explains that the…
Lakshmi Subramanian, “The Sovereign and the Pirate: Ordering Maritime Subjects in India’s Western Littoral” (Oxford UP, 2016)
Jul 27 • 86 min
Lakshmi Subramanian’s The Sovereign and the Pirate: Ordering Maritime Subjects in India’s Western Littoral (Oxford University Press, 2016) offers an amphibious history written around the juncture of the nineteenth century, when the northwestern littoral…
R. K. Jefferson and H. B. Johnson, “Shortlisted: Women in the Shadows of the Supreme Court (NYU Press, 2020)
Jul 27 • 60 min
Before Ronald Reagan appointed Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court in 1981, nine highly qualified women were on the shortlist. What do the stories of these women tell us about the judiciary? Gender? Feminism? Race? In Shortlisted: Women in the…
Kathleen Bachynski, “No Game for Boys to Play: The History of Youth Football and the Origins of a Public Health Crisis” (UNC Press, 2019)
Jul 27 • 62 min
Today we are joined by Kathleen Bachynski, Assistant Professor of Public Health at Muhlenberg College, and author of No Game for Boys to Play: The History of Youth Football and the Origins of a Public Health Crisis (University of North Carolina Press,…
Iraj Bashiri, “The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan” (Lexington Books, 2016)
Jul 25 • 51 min
In The History of the Civil War in Tajikistan (Lexington Books) Iraj Bashiri provides an overview of the Civil War in Tajikistan that emerged amidst the collapse of the Soviet Union. Based on personal observations, interviews, and a variety of primary and…
Shahla Haeri, “The Unforgettable Queens of Islam: Succession, Authority and Gender” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jul 24 • 71 min
The Unforgettable Queens of Islam: Succession, Authority and Gender (Cambridge University Press, 2020) by Shahla Haeri (Associate Professor of Anthropology at Boston University) is a captivating book on the biographies of Muslim women rulers and political…
Justin Gomer, “White Balance: How Hollywood Shaped Colorblind Ideology and Undermined Civil Rights” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jul 24 • 69 min
Justin Gomer is the author of White Balance: How Hollywood Shaped Colorblind Ideology and Undermined Civil Rights, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2020. White Balance explores the connection between politics and film from the 1970s…
Thomas Bishop, “Every Home a Fortress: Cold War Fatherhood and the Family Fallout Shelter” (UMass Press, 2020)
Jul 24 • 29 min
In Every Home a Fortress: Cold War Fatherhood and the Family Fallout Shelter (University of Massachusetts Press, 2020), Thomas Bishop details the remarkable cultural history and personal stories behind an iconic figure of Cold War masculinity—the fallout…
Katherine Zien, “Sovereign Acts: Performing Race, Space, and Belonging in Panama and the Canal Zone” (Rutgers UP, 2017)
Jul 24 • 65 min
In Sovereign Acts: Performing Race, Space, and Belonging in Panama and the Canal Zone (Rutgers University Press, 2017), Katherine Zien examines the ways politicians, activists, artists, and residents performed and interpreted sovereignty in the Canal Zone…
Andrew S. Baer, “Beyond the Usual Beating” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Jul 23 • 80 min
In the 1970s and 1980s, a group of Chicago police officers routinely tortured criminal suspects in their custody, while fellow cops, state attorneys and elected officials looked the other way. In his book, Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police…
Laurie M. Wood, “Archipelago of Justice: Law in France’s Early Modern Empire” (Yale UP, 2020)
Jul 23 • 37 min
Historians have long treated the Atlantic and Indian Ocean routes of early modern French empire separately. But, early modern people understood France as a bi-oceanic empire, connected by vast but strong pathways of commercial, intellectual, and legal…
Elizabeth Shesko, “Conscript Nation: Coercion and Citizenship in the Bolivian Barracks” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)
Jul 23 • 75 min
Elizabeth Shesko’s Conscript Nation: Coercion and Citizenship in the Bolivian Barracks (University of Pittsburgh Press) is an intimate and rich history of the militarization of Bolivia over the course of the twentieth century through the lives of the men…
Tamar Herzog, “A Short History of European Law: The Last Two and a Half Millennia” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jul 22 • 95 min
To many observers, European law seems like the endpoint of a mostly random walk through history. Certainly the trajectory of legal systems in the West over the past 2,500 years is far from self-evident. In A Short History of European Law: The Last Two and…
Daniel Woolf, “A Concise History of History: Global Historiography from Antiquity to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 22 • 28 min
‘THOSE THAT DENY THEIR HISTORY ARE DOOMED TO REPEAT IT!’ So Tweeted the 45th President of the United States to his 80 million followers in June, as American streets once again were transformed into spaces of protest. It turns out that the President…
Edward Alpers, “The Indian Ocean in World History” (Oxford UP, 2014)
Jul 22 • 112 min
Edward Alpers’s The Indian Ocean in World History (Oxford University Press, 2014) is a concise yet an immensely informative introduction to the Indian Ocean world, which remains the least studied of the world’s geographic regions. Yet there have been…
Roger Moorhouse, “Poland 1939: The Outbreak of World War II” (Basic Books, 2020)
Jul 22 • 45 min
Historian and academic Roger Moorhouse, revisits the opening campaign of World War II, the German invasion of Poland in September 1939., in his new book Poland 1939: The Outbreak of World War II (Basic Book, 2020). Although the German invasion was the…
The Cold War as History
Jul 21 • 39 min
The Cold War, the on again and off again confrontation between the West and the Soviet Union is one of the most famous historical episodes of the short twentieth century. Accordingly, it is not surprising that the Cold War was an event which has divided…
Diana T. Kudaibergenova, “Toward Nationalizing Regimes: Conceptualizing Power and Identity in the Post-Soviet Realm” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)
Jul 21 • 54 min
The collapse of the Soviet Union famously opened new venues for the theories of nationalism and the study of processes and actors involved in these new nation-building processes. In Toward Nationalizing Regimes: Conceptualizing Power and Identity in the…
Amanda L. Scott, “The Basque Seroras: Local Religion, Gender, and Power in Northern Iberia, 1550-1800” (Cornell UP, 2020)
Jul 21 • 78 min
Amanda L. Scott’s book, The Basque Seroras: Local Religion, Gender, and Power in Northern Iberia, 1550-1800 (Cornell University Press, 2020), focuses on the Basque seroras, a category of uncloistered religious women that were employed by parishes to…
Assan Sarr, “Islam, Power, and Dependency in the Gambia River Basin” (Rochester UP, 2016)
Jul 21 • 45 min
An original, rigorously researched volume that questions long-accepted paradigms concerning land ownership and its use in Africa. Islam, Power, and Dependency in the Gambia River Basin (Rochester University Press, 2016) draws on new sources to offer an…
Giulia Bonazza, “Abolitionism and the Persistence of Slavery in Italian States 1750–1850” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
Jul 21 • 62 min
Abolitionism and the Persistence of Slavery in Italian States 1750–1850 (Palgrave MacMillian, 2019) offers a pioneering study of slavery in the Italian states. Documenting previously unstudied cases of slavery in six Italian cities—Naples, Caserta, Rome,…
Philip Reid, “The Merchant Ship in the British Atlantic, 1600-1800” (Brill, 2020)
Jul 20 • 47 min
To the average landlubber, the merchant ships that crossed the Atlantic Ocean in 1800 seem little different from their counterparts two centuries beforehand. By detailing how these ships were built and operated, though, Philip Reid shows in his book The…
Angela S. Chiu, “The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand” (U Hawaii Press, 2017)
Jul 20 • 55 min
For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand (University…
Gregory Afinogenov, “Spies and Scholars: Chinese Secrets and Imperial Russia’s Quest for World Power” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Jul 20 • 65 min
The ways in which states and empires spy on and study one another has changed a great deal over time in line with shifting political priorities, written traditions and technologies. Even on this highly diverse global background, however, the long process…
Wade Davies, “Native Hoops: The Rise of American Indian Basketball, 1895-1970” (UP of Kansas, 2020)
Jul 20 • 54 min
The game of basketball is perceived by most today as an “urban” game with a locale such as Rucker Park in Harlem as the game’s epicenter (as well as a pipeline to the NBA). While that is certainly a true statement, basketball is not limited to places such…
Leslie Dorrough Smith, “Compromising Positions: Sex Scandals, Politics, and American Christianity” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 17 • 62 min
Sex scandals are ubiquitous in American politics. In Compromising Positions: Sex Scandals, Politics, and American Christianity (Oxford University Press, 2019), Leslie Dorrough Smith examines the dynamics of political sex scandals and the rhetorical…
Walter Johnson, “The Broken Heart of America” (Basic Books, 2020)
Jul 17 • 61 min
St. Louis, Missouri is the city with the highest rate of police shootings in the United States. It’s the city with an 18 year difference in life expectancy between Black and white neighborhoods which stand just 10 miles apart. It’s the city where, after…
Luke Messac, “No More to Spend: Neglect and the Construction of Scarcity in Malawi’s History of Health Care” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 16 • 62 min
Dismal spending on government health services is often considered a necessary consequence of a low per-capita GDP, but are poor patients in poor countries really fated to be denied the fruits of modern medicine? In many countries, officials speak of…
Erik Grimmer-Solem, “Learning Empire: Globalization and the German Quest for World Status, 1875-1919”(Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 16 • 81 min
In his new book, Learning Empire: Globalization and the German Quest for World Status, 1875-1919 (Cambridge University Press) Erik Grimmer-Solem examines the process of German globalization that began in the 1870s, well before Germany acquired a colonial…
Luz María Hernández Sáenz, “Carving a Niche: The Medical Profession in Mexico 1800-1870” (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2018)
Jul 16 • 61 min
In Carving a Niche: The Medical Profession in Mexico 1800-1870 (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2018), Luz María Hernández Sáenz follows the trajectory of physicians in their quest for the professionalization of medicine in Mexico. In the nineteenth…
Scott Levi, “The Bukharan Crisis: A Connected History of 18th-Century Central Asia” (U Pittsburgh, 2020)
Jul 15 • 74 min
In his new book, The Bukharan Crisis: A Connected History of 18th-Century Central Asia (University of Pittsburgh, 2020), Scott Levi brings new perspectives into the historiography of early Modern Central Asia. Levi reflects on recent scholarship to…
Martin Jay, “Splinters in Your Eye: Frankfurt School Provocations” (Verso, 2020)
Jul 15 • 89 min
Although successive generations of the Frankfurt School have attempted to adapt Critical Theory to new circumstances, the work done by its founding members continues in the twenty-first century to unsettle conventional wisdom about culture, society and…
Elizabeth A. Williams, “Appetite and Its Discontents: Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Jul 15 • 51 min
Why do we eat? Is it instinct? Despite the necessity of food, anxieties about what and how to eat are widespread and persistent. In Appetite and Its Discontents: Science, Medicine, and the Urge to Eat, 1750-1950 (University of Chicago Press, 2020),…
Fay Bound Alberti, “A Biography of Loneliness: The History of an Emotion” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 14 • 53 min
Before the global pandemic of Covid-19 arrived, public health experts in the U.S. and U.K. were warning of the epidemic of loneliness. Loneliness steals more years of life than obesity. Loneliness is as much of a risk as smoking. Loneliness shortens a…
Jeremy A. Rinker, “Identity, Rights, and Awareness: Anticaste Activism in India” (Lexington, 2019)
Jul 14 • 69 min
For over a decade, Jeremy Rinker, Ph.D. has interacted, observed, and studied Dalit anti-caste social movements in India. In this critical comparative approach to India’s modern anti-caste resistance, Dr. Rinker emphasizes the complex interdependence…
Yuhang Li, “Becoming Guanyin: Artistic Devotion of Buddhist Women in Late Imperial China” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Jul 14 • 59 min
How did Buddhist women access religious experience and transcendence in a Confucian patriarchal system in imperial China? How were Buddhist practices carried out in the intimate settings of a boudoir? In Dr. Yuhang Li’s recent monograph, Becoming Guanyin:…
Philip M. Plotch, “Last Subway: The Long Wait for the Next Train in New York City” (Cornell UP, 2020)
Jul 13 • 42 min
Ever since New York City built one of the world’s great subway systems, no promise has been more tantalizing than the proposal to build a new subway line under Second Avenue in Manhattan. Yet the Second Avenue subway—although first envisioned in the…
Jennifer L. Holland, “Tiny You: A Western History of the Anti-Abortion Movement” (U California Press, 2020)
Jul 13 • 62 min
Sandie Holguín speaks with Jennifer L. Holland about her book, Tiny You: A Western History of the Anti-Abortion Movement (University of California Press, 2020). In addition to her book, Dr. Holland has recently published an article in Feminist Studies,…
Jeremy Black, “War in Europe: 1450 to the Present” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016)
Jul 10 • 44 min
War in Europe: 1450 to the Present (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016) is a masterful overview of war and military development in Europe since 1450, bringing together the work of a renowned historian of modern European and military history in a single…
Frank Dimatteo, “Lord High Executioner: The Legendary Mafia Boss Albert Anastasia” (Citadel, 2020)
Jul 10 • 44 min
Though not as well known today as many of his contemporaries, few American mob bosses were as feared as Albert Anastasia. As head of “Murder Inc.”, Anastasia presided over the contract killing of hundreds of people, some of whom he murdered with his own…
Ismael Garcia-Colon, “Colonial Migrants at the Heart of Empire: Puerto Rican Workers on U.S. Farms” (U California Press, 2020)
Jul 10 • 28 min
Ismael Garcia-Colon, Colonial Migrants at the Heart of Empire: Puerto Rican Workers on U.S. Farms (University of California Press, 2020) is the first in-depth look at the experiences of Puerto Rican migrant workers in continental U.S. agriculture in the…
Nancy Beck Young, “Two Suns of the Southwest” (U Kansas Press, 2019)
Jul 10 • 69 min
What does the 1964 presidential election have to teach us about party dynamics, civil rights and polarization? While many scholars have treated the dramatic candidates and characters such as Lyndon B. Johnson and Barry Goldwater, Nancy Beck Young’s Two…
Christopher Bonanos, “Flash: The Making of Weegee the Famous” (Henry Holt, 2018)
Jul 10 • 42 min
In the middle of the twentieth century, a newspaper photographer who went by the name of Weegee took memorable pictures of New York City’s street life that appeared everywhere from tabloid newspapers to seminars on the history of photography. Christopher…
Peniel E. Joseph, “The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.” (Basic, 2020)
Jul 9 • 56 min
How do the political afterlives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. continue to shape American democracy? How does a common myth of opposition distort our understanding of civil rights? In his dual biography, The Sword and the Shield: The…
Sabine Hildebrandt, “The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich” (Berghahn, 2017)
Jul 9 • 25 min
Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who…
Luca Scholz, “Borders and Freedom of Movement in the Holy Roman Empire” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 9 • 64 min
Today we speak with Luca Scholz, a Lecturer in Digital Humanities at the University of Manchester. Dr. Scholz has varied interests: wide-ranging data analysis, the collection of that data, broad trends over space and time, all of which intersect in the…
Francine Hirsch, “Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 9 • 84 min
How did an authoritarian regime help lay the cornerstones of human rights and international law? Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal  (Oxford University Press, 2020) argues that Anglo-American dominated…
Takashi Miura, “Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
Jul 8 • 39 min
In this interview, we talk to Takashi Miura, assistant professor in the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona, about his book Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan, (University of Hawaii Press, 2019). The book…
Jeremy Black, “History of Europe: From Prehistory to the 21st Century” (Arcturus, 2019)
Jul 8 • 42 min
In History of Europe: From Prehistory to the 21st Century, Jeremy Black presents a learned and yet entertaining exploration of the history: political, cultural and social of Europe from its prehistory to the 21st century. Beautifully illustrated and…
Robert Gerwarth, “November 1918: The German Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 8 • 56 min
Was Weimar doomed from the outset? In November 1918: The German Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2020), Robert Gerwarth argues that this is the wrong question to ask. Forget 1929 and 1933, the collapse of Imperial Germany began as a velvet revolution…
Richard Gergel, “Unexampled Courage” (Sarah Crichton Books, 2019)
Jul 8 • 90 min
In his new book Unexampled Courage: The Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring (Sarah Crichton Books, 2019), District Judge Richard M. Gergel asks pertinent questions for the Summer of…
Gina Anne Tam, “Dialect and Nationalism in China, 1860-1960” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jul 7 • 69 min
The question of how a state decides what its official language is going to be, or indeed whether it even needs one, is never simple, and this may be particularly true of China which covers a continental landmass encompassing multitude of different…
Jean Halley, “Horse Crazy: Girls and the Lives of Horses” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Jul 7 • 51 min
Today Jana Byars talks to Jean Halley, Professor of Sociology at the College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York about her new book Horse Crazy: Girls and the Lives of Horses (University of Georgia Press, 2019).…
Greg Mitchell, “The Beginning or the End: How Hollywood—and America—Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” (The New Press, 2020)
Jul 7 • 62 min
dSoon after atomic bombs exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, MGM set out to make a movie studio chief Louis B. Mayer called “the most important story” he would ever film: a big budget dramatization of the Manhattan Project and the invention and…
Kara Moskowitz, “Seeing Like A Citizen” (Ohio UP, 2019)
Jul 7 • 52 min
Kara Moskowitz, Assistant Professor of African History as the University of Missouri-St. Louis. has written a terrific book, Seeing Like A Citizen: Decolonization, Development and the Making of Kenya, 1945-1980 (Ohio University Press). Kara’s book is…
David Shimer, “Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Interference” (Knopf, 2020)
Jul 6 • 55 min
The “guard is tired.” With that simple phrase, the newly installed Bolshevik regime in Russia dismissed the duly elected Constituent Assembly in January 1918. And, one might say, so started Russia’s century-long interference in elections and electoral…
Stephan Talty, “The Good Assassin” (HMH, 2020)
Jul 6 • 41 min
History that reads like a thriller; The Good Assassin: How A Mossad Agent and a Band of Survivors Hunted Down The Butcher of Latvia (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020) by Stephan Talty is the untold story of an Israeli spy’s epic journey to bring the…
Allison Bigelow, “Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World” (UNC Press 2020)
Jul 6 • 44 min
Historians of Latin America have long appreciated the central role of mining and metallurgy in the region. The Spanish Empire in particular was created for and founded upon the mining and coining of silver ore from its colonies. Our knowledge about this…
Hope M. Harrison, “After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 6 • 74 min
In her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Hope M. Harrison examines the history and meaning of the Berlin Wall, Drawing on an extensive range of archival…
Nicole Myers Turner, “Soul Liberty: The Evolution of Black Religious Politics in Postemancipation Virginia” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jul 6 • 56 min
In her nuanced case study of postemanciaption Virginia, Nicole Myers Turner, (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University) challenges assumptions regarding the intersection between black religion and politics in this “signal moment of…
Kendra Preston Leonard, “Music for the Kingdom of Shadows: Cinema Accompaniment in the Age of Spiritualism” (Humanities Commons, 2010)
Jul 6 • 54 min
We might call movies made before the advent of the talkies in 1927 silent films—but for the audience, they were certainly not silent. Live orchestras and solo instrumentalists accompanied early movies, adding evocative music drawn from pre-existent and…
Jeremy Black, “Mapping Shakespeare: An Exploration of Shakespeare’s World through Maps” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
Jul 3 • 36 min
Jeremy Black, the prolific professor of history at Exeter University, has published a stunningly attractive volume entitled, Mapping Shakespeare: An Exploration of Shakespeare’s World through Maps (Bloomsbury, 2018). This lavishly illustrated volume…
Claudia Rueda, “Students of Revolution: Youth, Protest, and Coalition-Building in Somoza-Era Nicaragua” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Jul 3 • 53 min
Claudia Rueda’s book Students of Revolution: Youth, Protest, and Coalition-Building in Somoza-Era Nicaragua (University of Texas Press, 2019) is a history of student organizing against dictatorship in twentieth-century Nicaragua. By mobilizing in support…
Sarah Knott, “Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History” (Penguin, 2020)
Jul 3 • 40 min
Mothering is as old as human existence. But how has this most essential experience changed over time and cultures? What is the history of maternity—the history of pregnancy, birth, the encounter with an infant? In Mother Is a Verb: An Unconventional…
David Carballo, “Collision of Worlds: A Deep History of the Fall of Aztec Mexico and the Forging of New Spain” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 3 • 62 min
Mexico of five centuries ago was witness to one of the most momentous encounters between human societies, when a group of Spaniards led by Hernando Cortés joined forces with tens of thousands of Mesoamerican allies to topple the mighty Aztec Empire. It…
M. A. Weitekamp and M. Delaney, “Smithsonian American Women” (Smithsonian Books, 2019)
Jul 3 • 79 min
Smithsonian American Women: Remarkable Objects and Stories of Strength, Ingenuity and Vision from the National Collection (Smithsonian Book, 2019) is an inspiring and surprising celebration of U.S. women’s history told through Smithsonian artifacts…
Grace Elizabeth Hale, “Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jul 3 • 83 min
In Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture (University of North Carolina Press), Grace Elizabeth Hale tells the epic story of the Athens, Georgia music scene. Hale explains how a small college town hard to…
Nicole Maurantonio, “Confederate Exceptionalism: Civil War Myth and Memory in the Twenty-First Century” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Jul 3 • 54 min
In a time of contentious debate over Confederate monuments, Nicole Maurantonio (Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Communication studies and American Studies at the University of Richmond) provides an intriguing look into how revisionist ideas of the…
He Bian, “Know Your Remedies: Pharmacy and Culture in Early Modern China” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Jul 2 • 83 min
He Bian’s new book Know Your Remedies: Pharmacy and Culture in Early Modern China (Princeton University Press, 2020) is a beautiful cultural history of pharmacy in early modern China. This trans-dynastic book looks at how Chinese approaches to knowledge…
Doron Galili, “Seeing by Electricity: The Emergence of Television, 1878-1939” (Duke UP, 2020)
Jul 2 • 55 min
With the burst of new technologies in the 1870s, many inventors and visionaries believed that the transmission of moving images was just around the corner. As Doron Galili details in his book Seeing by Electricity: The Emergence of Television, 1878-1939…
Evan Smith, “No Platform: A History of Anti-Fascism, Universities and the Limits of Free Speech” (Routledge, 2020)
Jul 2 • 73 min
No Platform: A History of Anti-Fascism, Universities and the Limits of Free Speech (Routledge, 2020) is the first to outline the history of the tactic of ‘no platforming’ at British universities since the 1970s, looking at more than four decades of…
Joshua C. Myers, “We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989” (NYU Press, 2019)
Jul 2 • 43 min
We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (NYU Press, 2019) is the first history of the 1989 Howard University protest. The three-day occupation of the university’s Administration Building was a continuation of…
Kennan Ferguson, “Cookbooks Politics” (U Penn Press, 2020)
Jul 1 • 52 min
Many of us have stacks of cookbooks on our shelves, which we look through for ideas and inspiration, or to transport us to distant places with different foods, smells, experiences, and sometimes memories of our visits. Kennan Ferguson, Professor of…
Lucy Delap, “Feminisms: A Global History” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Jul 1 • 52 min
Today Jana Byars talks to Lucy Delap, Reader in Modern British and Gender History at Murray Edwards College, Cambridge University, about her new book Feminisms: A Global History (University of Chicago Press, 2020). This outstanding work, available later…
Vincent Bevins, “The Jakarta Method” (Public Affairs, 2020)
Jul 1 • 85 min
Why did the word “Jakarta” appear as graffiti on the streets of Santiago in 1973? Why did left-wing Chilean activists receive postcards in the mail with the ominous message “Jakarta is coming”? Why did a Brazilian general lose his temper in an interview…
Archie Brown, “The Human Factor: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Thatcher, and the End of the Cold War” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jul 1 • 52 min
What brought about an end to the Cold War has long been a subject of speculation and mythology. One prominent argument is that the United States simply bankrupted the Soviet Union, outspending the Soviets on the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, or “Star…
Kevin W. Fogg, “Indonesia’s Islamic Revolution” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jun 30 • 49 min
As Indonesia nears the 75th anniversary of its proclamation of independence this year, the socio-political debates surrounding her birth as a nation-state take on contemporary salience. In Indonesia’s Islamic Revolution (Cambridge UP, 2019), Kevin W. Fogg…
Mark Vincent, “Criminal Subculture in the Gulag” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020)
Jun 30 • 49 min
Most Gulag scholarship focuses on political prisoners and, as a result, our knowledge of the camps as a lived experience remains relatively incomplete. Criminal Subculture in the Gulag: Prisoner Society in the Stalinist Labour Camps, 1924–53 (Bloomsbury…
James M. Lundberg, “Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Jun 30 • 45 min
During his nearly four decades as a newspaper editor and politician, Horace Greeley embraced a range of controversial causes. In his book Horace Greeley: Print, Politics, and the Failure of American Nationhood (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019), James M. Lundberg…
Macabe Keliher, “The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China” (U California Press, 2019)
Jun 29 • 69 min
Bringing attention to the importance of li (an articulated system of social domination and political legitimization, consisting of rituals, ceremonies, and rites) as the foundation of the Qing political system, Macabe Keliher’s book The Board of Rites and…
Adam Goodman, “The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Jun 29 • 69 min
Many of us know that immigrants have been deported from the United States for well over a century, but has anyone ever asked how? In The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants (Princeton University Press, 2020), author Adam…
Michael Schuman, “Superpower Interrupted: The Chinese History of the World” (PublicAffairs, 2020)
Jun 29 • 53 min
We stand on the eve of a different kind of world, but comprehending it is difficult: we are so accustomed to dealing with the paradigms of the contemporary world that we inevitably take them for granted, believing that they are set in concrete rather than…
Nancy MacLean, “Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America” (Viking, 2017)
Jun 29 • 69 min
The far-right has been coming after democracy for decades and we may be just one election away from a total takeover. Join NBN host and rhetorical scholar Lee Pierce (she/they) for a robust discussion of Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the…
Gerarldo Cadava, “The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump” (Ecco, 2020)
Jun 26 • 63 min
In the lead-up to every election cycle, pundits predict that Latino Americans will overwhelmingly vote in favor of the Democratic candidate. And it’s true—Latino voters do tilt Democratic. Hillary Clinton won the Latino vote in a “landslide,” Barack Obama…
Josh Cerretti, “Abuses of the Erotic: Militarizing Sexuality in the Post-Cold War United States” (U Nebraska Press, 2020)
Jun 26 • 61 min
In this episode, Jana Byars talks to Josh Cerretti, Associate Professor of History and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Western Washington University about his new book, Abuses of the Erotic: Militarizing Sexuality in the Post-Cold War United…
Alanna O’Malley, “The Diplomacy of Decolonisation: America, Britain, and the United Nations during the Congo Crisis, 1960-1964” (Manchester UP, 2020)
Jun 26 • 62 min
In the summer of 1960, the Republic of the Congo won its independence from Belgium. Only one week later, however, Belgium had already dispatched paratroopers into the country and the Congolese government was appealing to the United Nations to intervene…
Thomas C. Rust, “Watching over Yellowstone: The US Army’s Experience in America’s First National Park, 1886–1918” (UP of Kansas, 2020)
Jun 25 • 65 min
When, in 1883, Congress charged the US Army with managing Yellowstone National Park, soldiers encountered a new sort of hostility: work they were untrained for, in a daunting physical and social environment where they weren’t particularly welcome. When…
Richard Carswell, “The Fall of France in the Second World War: History and Memory” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
Jun 25 • 61 min
This fascinating book by Richard Carswell looks at how the fall of France in the Second World War has been recorded by historians and remembered within French society. The Fall of France in the Second World War: History and Memory (Palgrave Macmillan,…
Ainissa Ramirez, “The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another” (MIT Press, 2020)
Jun 25 • 39 min
In this interview, I talk to Dr. Ainissa Ramirez about her new book, The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another (MIT Press, 2020) Dr. Ramirez examines eight inventions―clocks, steel rails, copper communication cables, photographic…
Anya Jabour, “Sophonisba Breckinridge: Championing Women’s Activism in Modern America” (U Illinois Press, 2019)
Jun 25 • 66 min
Sophonisba Breckinridge’s remarkable career stretched from the Civil War to the Cold War. She took part in virtually every reform campaign of the Progressive and New Deal eras and became a nationally and internationally renowned figure. Her work informed…
Oded Y. Steinberg, “Anglo-German Thought in the Victorian Era” (U Penn Press, 2019)
Jun 25 • 49 min
Oded Y. Steinberg (DPhil Oxford) is a fellow at the Center for the Study of Conversion and Inter-Religious Encounters, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Next year (2020-21), Steinberg will begin his joint tenure-track position at the Department of…
A. de la Fuente and A. J. Gross, “Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jun 24 • 52 min
How did Africans become ‘blacks’ in the Americas? Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana (Cambridge University Press, 2020) tells the story of enslaved and free people of color who used the law to claim…
Sam Roberts, “A History of New York in 27 Buildings: The 400-Year Untold Story of an American Metropolis” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Jun 24 • 42 min
In his new book A History of New York in 27 Buildings: The 400-Year Untold Story of an American Metropolis (Bloomsbury, 2019), New York Times correspondent Sam Roberts tells the story of the city through bricks, glass, wood, and mortar, revealing why and…
Greg Garrett, “A Long, Long Way: Hollywood’s Unfinished Journey from Racism to Reconciliation” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jun 24 • 64 min
In his powerful new book, A Long, Long Way: Hollywood’s Unfinished Journey from Racism to Reconciliation (Oxford University Press, 2020), Greg Garrett brings his signature brand of theologically motivated cultural criticism to bear on this history. After…
John Roosa, “Buried Histories: The Anticommunist Massacres of 1965-1966 in Indonesia” (U Wisconsin Press, 2020)
Jun 24 • 98 min
On the night of September 30/October 1, 1965, a bungled coup d’état resulted in the deaths of a handful of Indonesian generals and a young girl. Within days the Indonesian army claimed that the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI), the largest communist party…
Michael Goldfield, “The Southern Key: Class, Race, and Radicalism in the 1930s and 1940s” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jun 24 • 29 min
The golden key to understanding the last 75 years of American political development, the eminent labor relations scholar Michael Goldfield argues, lies in the contests between labor and capital in the American South during the 1930s and 1940s. Labor…
Robert T. Chase, “We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in Postwar America” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jun 24 • 67 min
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Robert T. Chase about his book, We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in Postwar America (UNC Press, 2020). In the early twentieth century, the brutality of southern prisons became a…
E. Bruce Geelhoed, “Diplomacy Shot Down: The U-2 Crisis and Eisenhower’s Aborted Mission to Moscow, 1959–1960” (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)
Jun 24 • 54 min
The history of the Cold War is littered with what-ifs, and in Diplomacy Shot Down: The U-2 Crisis and Eisenhower’s Aborted Mission to Moscow, 1959–1960 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2020), Professor of History, E. Bruce Geelhoed of Ball State University…
Derek R. Sainsbury, “Storming the Nation: The Unknown Contributions of Joseph Smith’s Political Missionaries” (BYU RSC, 2020)
Jun 23 • 44 min
Derek R. Sainsbury’s, Storming the Nation: The Unknown Contributions of Joseph Smith’s Political Missionaries (BYU RSC, 2020), uncovers the significant but previously unknown contributions of the electioneers who advocated for Joseph Smith’s 1844…
Julia Obertreis, “Imperial Desert Dreams: Cotton Growing and Irrigation in Central Asia, 1860-1991” (V and R Unipress, 2017)
Jun 23 • 46 min
In Imperial Desert Dreams: Cotton Growing and Irrigation in Central Asia, 1860-1991 (V & R Unipress, 2017), Julia Obertreis explores the infrastructural, technical, and environmental aspects of the history of cotton agriculture and irrigation in Soviet…
Natalie Kimball, “An Open Secret: The History of Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion in Modern Bolivia” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Jun 23 • 71 min
Natalie Kimball is the author of An Open Secret: The History of Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion in Modern Bolivia, out this year from Rutgers University Press. An Open Secret argues that, despite stigma and continued legal prohibitions, practices and…
Catherine Belton, “Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West” (FSG, 2020)
Jun 23 • 37 min
The Russian state is back. That may not be a big surprise to Russia watchers. The degree to which it is a KGB state, however, is documented in great detail in Catherine Belton’s new book Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the…
Alec Ryrie, “Unbelievers: An Emotional History of Doubt” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jun 22 • 67 min
In Unbelievers: An Emotional History of Doubt (Harvard University Press, 2019), Alec Ryrie, the award-winning author of Protestants offers a new vision of the birth of the secular age, looking to the feelings of ordinary men and women―so often left out of…
Ashley E. Kerr, ”Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910)” (Vanderbilt UP, 2020)
Jun 22 • 66 min
Analyzing a wide variety of late-nineteenth-century sources, Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910) (Vanderbilt University Press, 2020) argues that Argentine scientific projects of the era were not just racial…
Gabriel Finder, “Justice behind the Iron Curtain: Nazis on Trial in Communist Poland” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
Jun 22 • 83 min
When Americans think about trials of Holocaust perpetrators, they generally think of the Nuremberg Trials or the trial of Adolf Eichmann or perhaps of the Frankfort trials of perpetrators from Auschwitz. If they think of Polish trials at all, they likely…
John Harney, “Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Jun 22 • 64 min
Today we are joined by John Harney, Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Asian Studies Department at Centre College, and author of Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968 (University of Nebraska Press, 2019). In…
Clifford Mason, “Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Jun 22 • 62 min
Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun (Rutgers University Press, 2020) by Clifford Mason, celebrated actor, director, writer, and playwright, and author of thirty-four plays, is a sweeping history of Black…
Anya P. Foxen, “Inhaling Spirit: Harmonialism, Orientalism, and the Western Roots of Modern Yoga” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Jun 19 • 56 min
In her new book Inhaling Spirit: Harmonialism, Orientalism, and the Western Roots of Modern Yoga (Oxford University Press, 2020), Anya Foxen traces several disparate yet entangled roots of modern yoga practice to show that much of what we call yoga in the…
B. L. Johnson and M. M. Quinlan, “You’re Doing it Wrong! Mothering, Media and Medical Expertise” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
Jun 19 • 82 min
New mothers face a barrage of confounding decisions during the life-cycle of early motherhood which includes… Should they change their diet or mindset to conceive? Exercise while pregnant? Should they opt for a home birth or head for a hospital? Whatever…
Scott Laderman, “Empire in Waves: A Political History of Surfing” (U California Press, 2014)
Jun 19 • 77 min
Since 2020 has been such a horrifying year (and it’s only June!), it would be nice to relax a bit this summer and talk about something fun and apolitical like surfing. After all, what’s more chill then hanging at the beach and catching some waves? But…
Ken O. Opalo, “Legislative Development in Africa: Politics and Postcolonial Legacies” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jun 19 • 73 min
Legislative Development in Africa: Politics and Postcolonial Legacies (Cambridge University Press, 2019) examines the development of African legislatures from their colonial origins through independence, autocracy and the transition to multi-party rule.…
Minou Arjomand, “Staged: Show Trials, Political Theater, and the Aesthetics of Judgment” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Jun 18 • 76 min
In Staged: Show Trials, Political Theater, and the Aesthetics of Judgment (Columbia University Press, 2020), Minou Arjomand provides a startling account of the many intersections between theatre and trials in Germany and the United States from the 1930s…
Brian DeMare, ”Land Wars: The Story of China’s Agrarian Revolution” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jun 18 • 66 min
Many people outside China, and indeed many urbanites living in the country, rarely think about its vast rural areas. Yet today’s People’s Republic in many ways owes existence to the countryside where, seven and more decades ago, a rural revolution brought…
Hilde Løvdal Stephens, “Family Matters: James Dobson and Focus on the Family’s Crusade for the Christian Home” (U Alabama Press, 2019)
Jun 18 • 35 min
Dr. Hilde Løvdal Stephens is a Visiting Associate Professor of English at the University of South-Eastern Norway. Her first book is titled Family Matters: James Dobson and Focus on the Family’s Crusade for the Christian Home (University of Alabama Press,…
Teresa Bergman, “The Commemoration of Women in the United States” (Routledge, 2019)
Jun 18 • 67 min
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews Teresa Bergman of the University of the Pacific on The Commemoration of Women in the United States: Remembering Women in Public Space (Routledge, 2019). Examining the public…
Henry M. Cowles, “The Scientific Method: An Evolution of Thinking from Darwin to Dewey” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Jun 17 • 55 min
The idea of a single scientific method, shared across specialties and teachable to ten-year-olds, is just over a hundred years old. For centuries prior, science had meant a kind of knowledge, made from facts gathered through direct observation or deduced…
Joe Geisner, “Writing Mormon History: Historians and Their Books” (Signature Books, 2020)
Jun 17 • 79 min
Every great book has a great backstory. In Joe Geisner’s new edited work, Writing Mormon History: Historians and Their Books (Signature Books, 2020), well-known historians describe their journeys of writing books that have influenced our understanding of…
Nathan G. Alexander, “Race in a Godless World: Atheism, Race, and Civilization, 1850–1914” (NYU Press, 2019)
Jun 17 • 42 min
Is modern racism a product of secularization and the decline of Christian universalism? The debate has raged for decades, but up to now, the actual racial views of historical atheists and freethinkers have never been subjected to a systematic analysis. In…
Allan Downey, “The Creator’s Game: Lacrosse, Identity, and Indigenous Nationhood” (UBC Press, 2018)
Jun 17 • 61 min
Today we are joined by Allan Downey, Associate Professor of History and Indigenous Studies at McMaster University, and author of The Creator’s Game: Lacrosse, Identity, and Indigenous Nationhood (University of British Columbia Press, 2018). In our…
Elizabeth Horodowich, “The Venetian Discovery of America” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Jun 16 • 52 min
In this episode Jana Byars speaks with Elizabeth Horodowich, Professor of History at New Mexico State University, about her new book, The Venetian Discovery of America: Geographic Imagination and Print Culture in the Age of Encounters. We explore her…
Thomas C. Field Jr. et al., “Latin America and the Global Cold War” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jun 16 • 54 min
Latin America and the Global Cold War (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) analyzes more than a dozen of Latin America’s forgotten encounters with Africa, Asia, and the Communist world, and by placing the region in meaningful dialogue with the wider…
Jill Strauss, “Slavery’s Descendants: Shared Legacies of Race and Reconciliation” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
Jun 16 • 30 min
Race remains a potent and divisive force in our society. Whether it is the shooting of minority people by the police, the mass incarceration of people of color, or the recent KKK rallies that have been in the news, it is clear that the scars from the…
Imre Salusinszky, “The Hilton Bombing: Evan Pederick and the Ananda Marga” (Melbourne UP, 2019)
Jun 16 • 73 min
“Every morning of my life in the past few years I would wake with the thought, I’m a murderer. I have no right to enjoy life.” Evan Pederick speaking to psychiatrist William Barclay in prison about what lead him to confess to the Hilton bombing. In 1978,…
A Very Square Peg: A Podcast Series about Polymath Robert Eisler. Episode 2: Value Theory
Jun 16 • 51 min
In this episode (# 2), we discuss Eisler’s early years as a member of the Jewish bourgeoisie in turn-of-the-century Vienna with historian Steven Beller. We also hear from the closest living relative of Robert Eisler, his grand-nephew Richard Regen.…
Aaron Kamugisha, “Beyond Coloniality: Citizenship and Freedom in the Caribbean Intellectual Tradition” (Indiana UP, 2019)
Jun 16 • 61 min
Aaron Kamugisha reads CLR James and Sylvia Wynter to glean from them ways to navigate the “beyond” of coloniality. In his new book Beyond Coloniality: Citizenship and Freedom in the Caribbean Intellectual Tradition (Indiana University Press, 2019),…
Lynn M. Thomas, “Beneath the Surface: A Transnational History of Skin Lighteners” (Duke UP, 2020)
Jun 15 • 57 min
By 2024, global sales of skin lighteners are projected to reach more than $30 billion. Despite the planetary scale of its use, skin lightening remains a controversial cosmetic practice. Lynn M. Thomas’ new book, Beneath the Surface: A Transnational…
Robert C. McGreevey, “Borderline Citizens: The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Jun 15 • 49 min
In Borderline Citizens: The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration (Cornell University Press 2018), Robert C. McGreevey explores the contested meaning and limits of citizenship for Puerto Ricans from the late nineteenth century…
Paige Glotzer, “How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Jun 15 • 56 min
Paige Glotzer is the author of How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960, published by Columbia University Press in 2020. How the Suburbs Were Segregated examines the history surrounding how modern…
Alberto Harambour, “Soberanías fronterizas: Estados y capital en la colonización de Patagonia” (EUAC, 2019)
Jun 15 • 58 min
Alberto Harambour’s new book Soberanías Fronterizas. Estados y capital en la colonización de Patagonia (Argentina y Chile, 1840s-1920s) (Universidad Austral de Chile, 2019) examines the explosion of foreign-owned sheep farming, the fitful expansion of…
Mona L. Siegel, “Peace on Our Terms: The Global Battle for Women’s Rights After the First World” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Jun 15 • 61 min
We are all familiar with the story of how in early 1919 heads of state and diplomats from around the world came to Paris to negotiate a peace settlement with a defeated Germany and its allies. Many of us are aware of how nationalists such as Nguyễn Ái…
Garrett Felber, “Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jun 12 • 57 min
Challenging incarceration and policing was central to the post-war Black Freedom Movement. In his new book Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State (UNC Press, 2020), Garrett Felber centers the…
Elisheva A. Perelman, “American Evangelists and Tuberculosis in Modern Japan” (Hong Kong UP, 2020)
Jun 12 • 92 min
Elisheva A. Perelman’s new book American Evangelists and Tuberculosis in Modern Japan (Hong Kong University Press, 2020) examines the consequences of Japan’s decision not to tackle the tuberculosis epidemic that ravaged the country during the last quarter…
Romeo Guzman et al., “East of East: The Making of Greater El Monte” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Jun 12 • 71 min
Romeo Guzman’s and his colleague’s East of East: The Making of Greater El Monte (Rutgers University Press, 2020) is an edited collection of thirty-one essays that trace the experience of a California community over three centuries, from eighteenth-century…
Nandini Patwardhan, “Radical Spirits: India’s First Woman Doctor and Her American Champions” (Story Artisan Press, 2020)
Jun 12 • 66 min
In 1883, a young woman named Anandi Joshi set out from her native India to the United States to study medicine. To do so, as Nandini Patwardhan describes in her book Radical Spirits: India’s First Woman Doctor and Her American Champions (Story Artisan…
Fadi A. Bardawil, “Revolution and Disenchantment: Arab Marxism and the Binds of Emancipation” (Duke UP, 2020)
Jun 11 • 90 min
In his Theses on Feuerbach, Marx famously claimed that philosophers had previously only attempted to interpret the world; the point, however, was to change it. In the 20th century, no philosopher had as great an effect on the world than Marx, with various…
Howard Philips Smith, “Southern Decadence in New Orleans” (LSU Press, 2018)
Jun 11 • 63 min
Almost a year ago, on my second interview for this podcast, I talked to Howard Philips Smith about Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. I invited him back to tell us about his follow up book: Southern Decadence in New…
Edward Onaci, “Free The Land: The Republic of New Afrika and the Pursuit of a Black Nation-State” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jun 11 • 55 min
On March 31, 1968, over 500 Black nationalists convened in Detroit to begin the process of securing independence from the United States. Many concluded that Black Americans’ best-remaining hope for liberation was the creation of a sovereign nation-state,…
Why Did the Allies Win World War One?
Jun 11 • 37 min
The Great War was perhaps the greatest single upheaval of the 20th century. While World War II saw more lives lost, in terms of the shock to European/Western civilization, the Great War was a more horrendous event. Perhaps nothing was as unexpected in…
Jóhanna Katrín Friðriksdóttir, “Valkyrie: The Women of the Viking World” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Jun 11 • 59 min
Fascination with the Viking Age seems to be at an all-time high, though it has never really gone out of fashion. There is something irresistible about the Vikings, a civilization dedicated to exploring the edges of the known world, forging an empire from…
Jennifer Holland, “Tiny You: A Western History of the Anti-Abortion Movement” (U California Press, 2020)
Jun 10 • 70 min
Although much has been written about the anti-abortion movement in the United States, Jennifer Holland (Assistant Professor of U.S. History, University of Oklahoma) has written the first monograph-length history of the pro-life campaign for American…
Cristina Soriano, “Tides of Revolution: Information, Insurgencies, and the Crisis of Colonial Rule in Venezuela” (UNM Press, 2018)
Jun 10 • 66 min
In Tides of Revolution: Information, Insurgencies, and the Crisis of Colonial Rule in Venezuela (University of New Mexico Press, 2018), Cristina Soriano examines the links between the spread of radical ideas, literacy, and the circulation of information…
Thomas John Lappas, “In League Against King Alcohol” (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)
Jun 10 • 59 min
Many Americans are familiar with the real, but repeatedly stereotyped problem of alcohol abuse in Indian country. Most know about the Prohibition Era and reformers who promoted passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, among them the members of the Woman’s…
Ana María Reyes, “The Politics of Taste: Beatriz González and Cold War Aesthetics” (Duke UP, 2019)
Jun 9 • 56 min
In The Politics of Taste: Beatriz González and Cold War Aesthetics (Duke University Press, 2019), Ana María Reyes examines the ways Colombian artist Beatriz González and Argentine-born art critic Marta Traba railed against international forms of modernism…
Mauro Nobili, “Sultan, Caliph, and the Renewer of the Faith” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jun 9 • 58 min
In the early 19th century, on the floodplain of the Niger river’s inland delta in West Africa (present-day Mali), the Caliphate of Ḥamdallāhi emerged. The new State, locally known as the Maasina Diina, sought to consolidate its dominance over Fulani,…
Tamara Venit-Shelton, “Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jun 8 • 72 min
The modern popularity of acupuncture and herbal medicine belies the long history of Chinese medicine in the U.S. In Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace (Yale University Press, 2019), Tamara Venit-Shelton…
Joshua Bennett, “Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Jun 8 • 58 min
Throughout US history, black people have been configured as sociolegal nonpersons, a subgenre of the human. Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man (Harvard University Press, 2020) delves into the literary imagination and ethical concerns…
H. Moore and J. Tracy, “No Fascist USA!” (City Lights, 2020)
Jun 8 • 69 min
No Fascist USA!: The John Brown Anti-Klan Committee and Lessons for Today’s Social Movements (City Lights Publishing, 2020) by Hilary Moore and James Tracy recounts the stories of fearless organizers and activists who created an anti-racist social…
Jay Timothy Dolmage, “Disabled Upon Arrival: Eugenics, Immigration, and the Construction of Race” (OSU Press, 2018)
Jun 8 • 70 min
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews Jay Timothy Dolmage of the University of Waterloo on the new book Disabled Upon Arrival: Eugenics, Immigration, and the Construction of Race and Disability (Ohio State University Press,…
Alexander Gendler, “Khurbm 1914-1922: Prelude to the Holocaust” (Varda Books, 2019)
Jun 8 • 69 min
The murder of two-thirds of European Jews, referred to by many as the Holocaust, did not begin June 22, 1941, with the German invasion of the Soviet Union, or September 1, 1939, with the beginning of WWII, or with 1938 Kristallnacht, or even with the 1933…
Jon Wilkman, “Screening Reality: How Documentary Filmmakers Reimagined America” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Jun 8 • 71 min
Screening Reality: How Documentary Filmmakers Reimagined America (Bloomsbury, 2020) is a widescreen view of how American “truth” has been discovered, defined, projected, televised, and streamed during more than one hundred years of dramatic change,…
Joyce E. Leader, “From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genocide” (Potomac Books, 2020)
Jun 5 • 79 min
Earlier this year the world marked the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide. An occasion for mourning and reflection also offered a chance to reflect on the state of research about the genocide. Among the many books that were published in the past…
Stanislav Kulchytsky, “The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor” (CIUS Press, 2018)
Jun 5 • 99 min
Stanislav Kulchytsky’s The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor (CIUS Press, 2018) presents a meticulous research that unveils the mechanism of the Holodomor as a man-made famine, which was launched in Ukraine by the Soviets as a…
Kenneth Womack, “Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and The End of The Beatles” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jun 4 • 47 min
To what degree did each of The Beatles exhibit emotional intelligence in the band’s final year? You’ll find out in the discussion I had with Kenneth Womack about his new book Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and The End of The Beatles (Cornell…
James C. Scott, “Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States” (Yale UP, 2017)
Jun 4 • 54 min
We are schooled to believe that states formed more or less synchronously with settlement and agriculture. In Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States (Yale University Press, 2017), James C. Scott asks us to question this belief. The…
Kathryn M. De Luna, “Collecting Food, Collecting People: Subsistence and Society in Central Africa” (Yale UP, 2016)
Jun 4 • 71 min
In Collecting Food, Collecting People: Subsistence and Society in Central Africa (Yale University Press, 2016), Kathryn M. De Luna documents the evolving meanings borne in the collection of wild foods for an agricultural people in south central Africa…
Pablo Meninato, “Unexpected Affinities: The History of Type in Architectural Project from Laugier to Duchamp” (Routledge, 2018)
Jun 3 • 48 min
While the concept of “type” has been present in architectural discourse since its formal introduction at the end of the eighteenth century, its role in the development of architectural projects has not been comprehensively analyzed. This book proposes a…
Breanne Fahs, “Burn It Down: Feminist Manifestos for the Revolution” (Verso, 2020)
Jun 3 • 55 min
Burn It Down: Feminist Manifestos for the Revolution (Verso, 2020), Breanne Fahs has curated a comprehensive collection of feminist manifestos from the nineteenth century to today. Fahs collected over seventy-five manifestos from around the world, calling…
Bharat Malkani, “Slavery and the Death Penalty: A Study in Abolition” (Routledge, 2018)
Jun 3 • 32 min
What is the connection between the movement for death penalty abolition and the anti-slavery movement? In Slavery and the Death Penalty: A Study in Abolition (Routledge, 2018), Bharat Malkani, Senior Lecturer in Law at Cardiff University, explores this…
Tanya Harmer, “Beatriz Allende: A Revolutionary Life in Cold War Latin America” (UNC Press, 2020)
Jun 3 • 56 min
Tanya Harmer’s new biography, Beatriz Allende: A Revolutionary Life in Cold War Latin America (University of North Carolina Press, 2020), explores how a young Chilean woman pursued her political commitments and navigated patriarchal strictures as a…
Javier Semper Vendrell, “The Seduction of Youth: Print Culture and Homosexual Rights in the Weimar Republic” (U Toronto Press, 2020)
Jun 3 • 66 min
The Weimar Republic is well-known for its gay rights movement and recent scholarship has demonstrated some of its contradictory elements. In his recent book entitled The Seduction of Youth: Print Culture and Homosexual Rights in the Weimar Republic…
Brian Greene, “Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter, and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe” (Random House, 2020)
Jun 2 • 120 min
Brian Greene is a Professor of Mathematics and Physics at Columbia University in the City of New York, where he is the Director of the Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics, and co-founder and chair of the World Science Festival. He…
Donald Stevens, “Mexico in the Time of Cholera” (U New Mexico Press, 2019)
Jun 2 • 40 min
Donald F. Stevens offers us a portrait of early republican life in his new book, Mexico in the Time of Cholera, published in 2019 by the University of New Mexico Press. Although Stevens uses the 1833 Cholera epidemic that devastated independent Mexico as…
Deborah Dash Moore, “Jewish New York: The Remarkable Story of a City and a People” (NYU Press, 2017)
Jun 2 • 46 min
Jewish New York: The Remarkable Story of a City and a People (NYU Press, 2017) reveals the multifaceted world of one of the city’s most important ethnic and religious groups. Jewish immigrants changed New York. They built its clothing industry and…
Dale Cockrell, “Everybody’s Doin’ It: Sex, Music, and Dance in New York, 1840-1917” (Norton, 2019)
Jun 2 • 60 min
Most books about American music ask how it sounded, who wrote it, or who performed it. In his new book, Everybody’s Doin’ It: Sex, Music, and Dance in New York, 1840-1917 (Norton, 2019), Dale Cockrell asks a different question: where is American music?…
Nemata Blyden, “African Americans and Africa: a New History” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jun 2 • 57 min
“What is Africa to me?”, African-American writer Countee Cullen asked in Color, his 1925 collection of poems. African Americans and Africa: A New History (Yale University Press, 2019) lays out the long history of African American engagement with the…
Eric Lee, “The Night of the Bayonets: The Texel Uprising and Hitler’s Revenge, April–May 1945” (Greenhill Books, 2020)
Jun 2 • 53 min
Eric Lee’s new book The Night of the Bayonets: The Texel Uprising and Hitler’s Revenge, April–May 1945 (Greenhill Books, 2020) tells the story of the events leading up to the little-known revolt of Georgian Wehrmacht recruits against the Germans on the…
Amy Harris, “Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike” (Manchester UP, 2016)
Jun 2 • 84 min
Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike (Manchester University Press, 2016), by Amy Harris, examines the impact sisters and brothers had on eighteenth-century English families and society. Using evidence from letters,…
Roxann Prazniak, “Sudden Appearances: The Mongol Turn in Commerce, Belief, and Art” (U Hawaii Press 2019)
Jun 2 • 67 min
The “Mongol turn” in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries forged new political, commercial, and religious circumstances in Eurasia. This legacy can be found in the “sudden appearances” of common themes, styles, motifs, and even pigments that circulated…
Anthony Valerio, “Semmelweis: The Women’s Doctor” (Zantedeschi Books, 2019)
Jun 1 • 60 min
Though his advice has saved the lives of millions of people, the name Ignaz Semmelweis is not one commonly known today. In his book Anthony Valerio’s Semmelweis: The Women’s Doctor (Zantedeschi Books, 2019). Valerio details the many struggles Semmelweis…
Monique A. Bedasse, “Jah Kingdom: Rastafarians, Tanzania, and Pan-Africanism in the Age of Decolonization” (UNC Press, 2017)
Jun 1 • 61 min
Jah Kingdom: Rastafarians, Tanzania, and Pan-Africanism in the Age of Decolonization (UNC Press, 2017), examines Rastafarian repatriation to Tanzania in the 1970s and 1980s. In doing so, Monique A. Bedasse situates Rastafarianism’s connection to black…
Andrei Kushnir, “Epic Journey: Life and Times of Wasyl Kushnir” (Academic Studies Press, 2020)
Jun 1 • 51 min
In Epic Journey: Life and Times of Wasyl Kushnir (Academic Studies Press, 2020), Andrei Kushnir documents the story of his father, Wasyl Kushnir, who was born in the western part of Ukraine in 1923. The book is based on Wasyl Kushnir’s memoirs and it…
Pamela S. Nadell, “America’s Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today” (Norton, 2019)
Jun 1 • 54 min
Ronnie Grinberg speaks with Pamela S. Nadell, the Patrick Clendenen Chair in Women’s and Gender History and director of Jewish studies at American University. Her books include America’s Jewish Women, winner of the Everett Family Foundation Book of the…
Chiara Formichi, “Islam and Asia: A History” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
May 30 • 69 min
Challenging the geographical narrative of the history of Islam, Chiara Formichi’s new book Islam and Asia: A History (Cambridge University Press, 2020), helps us to rethink how we tell the story of Islam and the lived expressions of Muslims without…
Michael Braddick, “The Common Freedom of the People: John Lilburne and the English Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2018)
May 29 • 28 min
As historical topics, political revolutions come in and out of fashion. At the moment the American Revolution as an ideological struggle engages the public, but historians are less sure. Books that used to have the Revolution at their centre now approach…
Ben Nobbs-Thiessen, “Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia’s Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present” (UNC Press, 2020)
May 28 • 61 min
Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia’s Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present (UNC Press, 2020), traces the entwined histories of Andean, Mennonite, and Okinawan migrants to Amazonian Bolivia during the twentieth century,…
Viet Thanh Nguyen, “Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War” (Harvard UP, 2016)
May 28 • 70 min
According to Viet Thanh Nguyen, all wars are fought twice: first on the field of battle, and then in the struggles over memory. In Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War (Harvard University Press, 2016) he explores the various ways in which the…
Carl Suddler, “Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York” (NYU Press, 2019)
May 28 • 65 min
A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths…
Alexander Bukh, “These Islands Are Ours” (Stanford UP, 2020)
May 28 • 80 min
Alexander Bukh’s These Islands Are Ours: The Social Construction of Territorial Disputes in Northeast Asia (Stanford University Press 2020) provides critical historical perspective on the social construction of territorial disputes between Japan and its…
Vaneesa Cook, “Spiritual Socialists: Religion and the American Left” (U Penn Press, 2019)
May 27 • 53 min
In this episode of the podcast, Vaneesa Cook discusses her new book Spiritual Socialists: Religion and the American Left (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019). The book shows that there is a deep religious strain within the American Left despite…
Coryne Hall, “Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust” (Amberley, 2020)
May 27 • 41 min
The balance of power in nineteenth-century Europe was anchored on one end by the redoubtable Queen Victoria (1819 -1901), the doyenne of sovereigns, and at the opposite end by the autocratic Romanov dynasty — four successive emperors who ruled Russia…
Manuel Barcia, ”The Yellow Demon of Fever: Fighting Disease in the 19th-Century Transatlantic Slave Trade” (Yale UP, 2020)
May 27 • 47 min
As we now know, epidemics and pandemics are not new phenomena. In her new book The Yellow Demon of Fever: Fighting Disease in the 19th-Century Transatlantic Slave Trade (Yale University Press, 2020), Manuel Barcia offers a striking rendition of the…
Richard Lachmann, “First Class Passengers on a Sinking Ship: Elite Politics and the Decline of Great Powers” (Verso, 2020)
May 27 • 71 min
Richard Lachmann’s First Class Passengers on a Sinking Ship: Elite Politics and the Decline of Great Powers (Verso, 2020) is a two-for-one deal. The first half of the book is a historical analysis of why some empires transform their geopolitical power…
Elissa Bemporad, “Legacy of Blood: Jews, Pogroms, and Ritual Murder in the Lands of the Soviets” (Oxford UP, 2019)
May 26 • 59 min
The history of antisemitism in Europe stretches back as far as Ancient Rome, but persecutions of Jews became widespread during the Crusades, beginning in the early 11th century when the wholesale massacre of entire communities became commonplace. From the…
Björn Krondorfer, “The Holocaust and Masculinities: Critical Inquiries into the Presence and Absence of Men” (SUNY Press, 2020)
May 26 • 52 min
In recent decades, scholarship has turned to the role of gender in the Holocaust, but rarely has it critically investigated the experiences of men as gendered beings. Beyond the clear observation that most perpetrators of murder were male, men were also…
Mary Fraser, “Policing the Home Front, 1914-1918: The Control of the British Population at War” (Routledge, 2018)
May 26 • 47 min
When Britain went to war in 1914, policemen throughout Great Britain found themselves called upon to perform an ever-increasing range of new tasks that reflected the expanded power of the British state in wartime. In Policing the Home Front, 1914-1918:…
Éva Guillorel, “Rhythms of Revolt: European Traditions and Memories of Social Conflict in Oral Culture” (Routledge, 2018)
May 26 • 49 min
The culture of insurgents in early modern Europe was primarily an oral one; memories of social conflicts in the communities affected were passed on through oral forms such as songs and legends. This popular history continued to influence political choices…
Kevin Duong, “The Virtues of Violence: Democracy Against Disintegration in Modern France” (Oxford UP, 2020)
May 26 • 57 min
Kevin Duong, a political theorist in the Politics Department at the University of Virginia, has written a fascinating analysis of the way that violence has been used, in a sense, to create or promote solidarity during the course of the “long nineteenth…
M’hamed Oualdi, “A Slave between Empires: A Transimperial History of North Africa” (Columbia UP, 2020)
May 25 • 41 min
In light of the profound physical and mental traumas of colonization endured by North Africans, historians of recent decades have primarily concentrated their studies of North Africa on colonial violence, domination, and shock. The choice is an…
Stanley D. M. Carpenter, “Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
May 22 • 58 min
Charles Lord Cornwallis’s campaign through the southern American colonies came to an ignominious close on October 19, 1781, on an open field outside Yorktown, Virginia. At approximately noon, Cornwallis’s beleaguered soldiers, exhausted and low on…
Iva Glisic, “The Futurist Files: Avant-Garde, Politics, and Ideology in Russia, 1905–1930” (NIU Press, 2018)
May 21 • 62 min
Futurism was Russia’s first avant-garde movement. Gatecrashing the Russian public sphere in the early twentieth century, the movement called for the destruction of everything old, so that the past could not hinder the creation of a new, modern society.…
Adam M. Sowards, “An Open Pit Visible from the Moon” (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)
May 21 • 33 min
Adam M. Sowards is professor of history at the University of Idaho and a leading environmental historian. His new book, An Open Pit Visible from the Moon: The Wilderness Act and the Fight to Protect Miners Ridge and the Public Interest (University of…
Johan Elverskog, “The Buddha’s Footprint: An Environmental History of Asia” (U Penn Press, 2020)
May 21 • 89 min
Challenging the popular image of Buddhism as a religion intrinsically concerned with the environment, Dr. John Elverskog’s new monograph, The Buddha’s Footprint: An Environmental History of Asia (University of Pennsylvania Press 2020), demonstrates that…
Paul Matzko, “The Radio Right” (Oxford UP, 2020)
May 20 • 53 min
Today’s right wing media has a long history that is largely unknown to its current listeners. In The Radio Right: How a Band of Broadcasters Took on the Federal Government and Built the Modern Conservative Movement (Oxford University Press, 2020), Paul…
Sarah M. A. Gualtieri, “Arab Routes: Pathways to Syrian California” (Stanford UP, 2019)
May 20 • 60 min
In her latest book, Arab Routes: Pathways to Syrian California(Stanford University Press, 2019), Sarah M. A. Gualtieri uncovers the dynamic and complex stories of Arabic-speaking migrant communities who came to call Southern California home. Rather than a…
Julia C. Strauss, “State Formation in China and Taiwan: Bureaucracy, Campaign, and Performance” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
May 20 • 98 min
State Formation in China and Taiwan: Bureaucracy, Campaign, and Performance (Cambridge University Press, 2019) by Julia C. Strauss is a comparative study of regime consolidation in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (Taiwan)…
Toshihiro Higuchi, “Political Fallout: Nuclear Weapons Testing and the Making of a Global Environmental Crisis” (Stanford UP, 2020)
May 20 • 67 min
In Political Fallout: Nuclear Weapons Testing and the Making of a Global Environmental Crisis (Stanford University Press, 2020), Toshihiro Higuchi presents a history of the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, by which the then-nuclear powers, US, USSR, and UK,…
Derek Penslar, “Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader” (Yale UP, 2020)
May 19 • 52 min
The life of Theodor Herzl (1860–1904) was as puzzling as it was brief. How did this cosmopolitan and assimilated European Jew become the leader of the Zionist movement? How could he be both an artist and a statesman, a rationalist and an aesthete, a stern…
Kathleen Gallagher Elkins, “Mary, Mother of Martyrs” (FSR, 2018)
May 19 • 56 min
Throughout Christian history, the Virgin Mary has been idealized as a self-sacrificing mother and a model for all Christian women to emulate. However, she is one of many ancient maternal figures whose narratives pivot on violent loss. In her 2018…
Brandon K. Winford, “John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights” (UP Kentucky, 2019)
May 19 • 79 min
John Hervey Wheeler (1908–1978) was one of the civil rights movement’s most influential leaders. In articulating a bold vision of regional prosperity grounded in full citizenship and economic power for African Americans, this banker, lawyer, and visionary…
Robert A. Karl, “Forgotten Peace: Reform, Violence and the Making of Contemporary Colombia” (U California Press 2017)
May 19 • 66 min
In Forgotten Peace: Reform, Violence and the Making of Contemporary Colombia (University of California Press 2017), Robert Karl explores how Colombians grappled with violence and peace during and after the period known as “La Violencia”—a period that many…
Louis A. Pérez, “Rice in the Time of Sugar: The Political Economy of Food in Cuba” (UNC Press, 2019)
May 19 • 56 min
In his book, Rice in the Time of Sugar: The Political Economy of Food in Cuba (UNC Press, 2019), Louis A. Pérez, Jr. explores how Cuba’s dependency on the sugar economy also made the island’s population dependent on food imports like rice. Despite efforts…
Betsy Gaines Quammen, “American Zion: Cliven Bundy, God and Public Lands in the West” (Torrey House, 2020)
May 18 • 49 min
In 2014, the cattle rancher Cliven Bundy entered the national spotlight after a showdown against federal officials over grazing rights on public lands. Two years later, his sons seized the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon and occupied it for forty days…
Wasana Wongsurawat, “The Crown and the Capitalists: The Ethnic Chinese and the Founding of the Thai Nation” (U Washington Press, 2019)
May 18 • 51 min
One can’t understand modern Thailand without understanding the role of the ethnic Chinese. And one can’t understand the role of the ethnic Chinese without understanding the history of their relationship to the Thai monarchy. This is exactly what Wasana…
Anne Lounsbery, “Life is Elsewhere: Symbolic Geography in the Russian Provinces” (Cornell UP, 2019)
May 18 • 71 min
In her journey through the greatest monuments of 19th- and early 20th-century Russian literature, as well as through lesser-known works from women and regional writers, Anne Lounsbery (Professor and Chair of the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies at…
Kory Olson, “The Cartographic Capital: Mapping Third Republic Paris” (Liverpool UP, 2018)
May 18 • 60 min
When is the last time you looked at/consulted a paper map? Perhaps you have one hanging on a wall at home or work, framed or not. Or maybe you have some old road maps in a stack somewhere, as I do, sitting untouched since various digital forms have made…
Brendan McGeever, “Antisemitism and the Russian Revolution” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
May 15 • 49 min
In Antisemitism and the Russian Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Dr Brendan McGeever, Lecturer in Sociology at Birkbeck, University of London, traces the complex history of the Antisemitism in the Russian Revolution. McGeever examines…
Caleb Simmons, “Devotional Sovereignty: Kingship and Religion in India” (Oxford UP, 2020)
May 15 • 61 min
In his book Devotional Sovereignty: Kingship and Religion in India (Oxford University Press, 2020), Caleb Simmons examines the reigns of Tipu Sultan (r. 1782-1799) and Krishnaraja Wodeyar III (r. 1799-1868) in the South Indian kingdom of Mysore to…
Sarah Schneewind, “Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos” (Harvard Asia Center, 2018)
May 15 • 56 min
What recourse did you have in Ming China if your very excellent local official was leaving your area and moving on to a new jurisdiction? You could try to block his path, you could wail and tear your hair out – or you could house an image of him in a…
Jia Lynn Yang, “One Mighty and Irresistible Tide: The Epic Struggle Over American Immigration, 1924–1965” (Norton, 2020)
May 14 • 67 min
In One Mighty and Irresistible Tide: The Epic Struggle Over American Immigration, 1924–1965 (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020), Jia Lynn Yang recounts the personalities and debates that brought about the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, which forms the…
Natasha J. Lightfoot, “Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation” (Duke UP, 2015)
May 14 • 73 min
In Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation (Duke University Press, 2015), Natasha J. Lightfoot traces the ways Antiguans and Barbudans experienced freedom in the immediate years before and decades after British emancipation in…
Tatiana Linkhoeva, “Revolution Goes East: Imperial Japan and Soviet Communism” (Cornell UP, 2020)
May 14 • 65 min
A century ago it wasn’t a virus whose spread was eliciting reactions around the world, but an idea. As Russia’s 1917 October Revolution distended itself across north Asia and reverberated globally, socialism acted – not unlike today’s pandemic – as a…
Ana Stevenson, “The Woman as Slave in Nineteenth-Century American Social Movements” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
May 13 • 53 min
In The Woman as Slave in Nineteenth-Century American Social Movements (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Ana Stevenson explores the ubiquity of what she terms the “woman-slave analogy” in nineteenth-century US feminist discourse. Using examples from the women’s…
Kenesha N. Grant, “The Great Migration and the Democratic Party” (Temple UP, 2020)
May 12 • 52 min
Kenesha N. Grant, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Howard University, at the beginning of her new book, The Great Migration and the Democratic Party: Black Voters and the Realignment of American Politics in the 20th Century (Temple University…
Melissa R. Klapper, “Ballet Class: An American History” (Oxford UP, 2020)
May 12 • 39 min
For much of the last century, ballet class has been a rite of passage for millions of little girls in the United States. Some of these students have gone on to professional careers as dancers, but many more take class for a few years—or many years—before…
Randy E. Barnett, “An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know” (Wolters Kluwer, 2019)
May 12 • 78 min
What do you think about these days when you hear the words, “Supreme Court?” Salacious news coverage of the confirmation hearings of Brett Kavanaugh? Gushing profiles of feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg? High school and vaguely recalled lectures about…
Richard McBride II, “Doctrine and Practice in Medieval Korean Buddhism: The Collected Works of Ŭich’ŏn” (U Hawaii Press, 2016)
May 12 • 72 min
Today I talked to Richard McBride II about Doctrine and Practice in Medieval Korean Buddhism: The Collected Works of Ŭich’ŏn (University of Hawaii Press, 2016). The book is a comprehensive study of the Koryŏ (918-1392) Buddhist exegete, Ŭichŏn, that…
David Ambaras, “Japan’s Imperial Underworlds: Intimate Encounters at the Borders of Empire” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
May 12 • 61 min
Through a series of provocative case studies on mobility, transgression, and intimacy, David Ambaras’s Japan’s Imperial Underworlds: Intimate Encounters at the Borders of Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2018) interrogates the spatial and ideological…
Lisa Balabanlilar, “The Emperor Jahangir: Power and Kingship in Mughal India” (I. B. Tauris, 2020)
May 8 • 64 min
Despite a reign that lasted for over two decades, the Mughal emperor Jahangir has often been regarded as a weak ruler who was hobbled by his addictions and dominated in his later years by his wife Nur Jahan. As Lisa Balabanlilar reveals in The Emperor…
Alexander Rocklin, “The Regulation of Religion and the Making of Hinduism in Colonial Trinidad” (UNC Press, 2019)
May 8 • 56 min
The history of the Caribbean Island of Trinidad bears witness to an important interplay between the religious practices of peoples of South Asian and those of peoples of African descent, and in particular the manner in which colonial religious categories…
Sheetal Chhabria, “Making the Modern Slum: The Power of Capital in Colonial Bombay” (U Washington Press, 2019)
May 8 • 38 min
In the 1870s, as colonial India witnessed some of the worst famines in its history where 6-10 million perished, observers watched in astonishment as famished people set out for the city of Bombay on foot in human caravans thousands of people long.…
Victor Uribe-Urán, “Fatal Love: Spousal Killers, Law, and Punishment in the Late Colonial Spanish Atlantic” (Stanford UP, 2016)
May 8 • 67 min
In his book Fatal Love: Spousal Killers, Law, and Punishment in the Late Colonial Spanish Atlantic (Stanford University Press 2016), Victor Uribe-Urán compares the cases of Spain, and the late-colonial societies of Mexico and Colombia, in a historical…
Abram Van Engen, “City on a Hill: A History of American Exceptionalism” (Yale UP, 2020)
May 7 • 35 min
Abram Van Engen is an Associate Professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. Van Engen’s research examines early American literature, the history of emotions, Puritanism, collective memory, and American Exceptionalism. His latest book is…
Kwasi Konadu, “In Our Own Way In this Part of the World” (Duke UP, 2019)
May 7 • 62 min
In his new book In Our Own Way In this Part of the World: Biography of an African Community, Culture and Nation (Duke University Press, 2019), Kwasi Konadu tells the story Kofi Donko (1913-1995) and the many communities he served as a blacksmith, healer,…
Alexander Zevin, “Liberalism at Large: The World According to the Economist” (Verso, 2019)
May 6 • 69 min
The Economist is a curious publication. It always takes a point of view (as opposed to the all-the-news-that’s-fit-to-print approach). It maintains a uniform voice (editors and writers are typically handpicked from the same elite British universities, and…
Christian Wright, “Carbon County, USA: Miners for Democracy in Utah and the West” (U Utah Press, 2020)
May 6 • 58 min
During the early 1970s, a movement of rank-and-file coal miners rose up in Appalachia to challenge mine bosses and stodgy union officials. They sought greater control over the workplace and a broadened vision of industrial power. Calling themselves the…
David A. Bateman, “Disenfranchising Democracy: Constructing the Electorate in the US, the UK, and France” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
May 5 • 55 min
David A. Bateman’s fascinating new book opens with a puzzle. In 19th-century America, why was mass democratization – abolishing property and tax qualifications – accompanied by the mass disenfranchisement of black, male citizens? The book highlights the…
Lucia Rubinelli, “Constituent Power: A History” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
May 4 • 50 min
“The intellectual historian has to start with the words.” – Richard Whatmore, What is Intellectual History? When political theorists write about the principle of popular power, that is, who are the people and what kind of power do they have – the language…
Carl Rollyson, “The Life of William Faulkner: The Past Is Never Dead, 1897-1934” (UVA Press, 2020)
May 4 • 57 min
As a novelist, short story author, screenwriter, and Nobel laureate, William Faulkner looms large in modern American literature. Yet the very range of his work and the sources for his rich literary worlds often defy easy assessment. In The Life of William…
Anne Heffernan, “Limpopo’s Legacy, Student Politics and Democracy in South Africa” (James Currey, 2019)
May 4 • 66 min
Anne Heffernan’s new book Limpopo’s Legacy, Student Politics and Democracy in South Africa (James Currey, 2019) is a thoroughly researched account of the Black Consciousness Movement, student activism, and politics in South Africa from the 1960s to the…
Laurence Monnais, “The Colonial Life of Pharmaceuticals: Medicines and Modernity in Vietnam” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
May 4 • 49 min
Situated at the crossroads between the history of colonialism, of modern Southeast Asia, and of medical pluralism, this history of medicine and health traces the life of pharmaceuticals in Vietnam under French rule. In The Colonial Life of…
Julia Stephens, “Governing Islam: Law, Empire, and Secularism in Modern South Asia” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
May 1 • 70 min
As British colonial rulers expanded their control in South Asia legal resolutions were increasingly shaped by the English classification of social life. The definitional divide that structured the role of law in most cases was the line between what was…
María Cristina García, “The Refugee Challenge in Post-Cold War America” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Apr 30 • 65 min
“Never again!” This was the rallying cry, seemingly universal and unanimous, among liberal nation-states as they formed the United Nations (UN) in 1945 and later signed the UN Declaration on Human Rights and the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment…
Lee Vinsel, “Moving Violations: Automobiles, Experts, and Regulations in the United States” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Apr 30 • 47 min
Cars are among our most ubiquitous technologies; one could say that the cultural lore of the postwar United States is written in tire marks. But as much as they have been a vehicle for liberation and expression, historian Lee Vinsel argues that…
Jeremy Black, “A Brief History of Portugal” (Robinson, 2020)
Apr 30 • 33 min
Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter University, has written a vivacious and insightful survey of Portuguese history, designed for travellers to the country. A Brief History of Portugal (Robinson, 2020) does exactly what it says on the tin.…
Paul M. Renfro, “Stranger Danger: Family Values, Childhood, and the American Carceral State” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Apr 30 • 34 min
Beginning with Etan Patz’s disappearance in Manhattan in 1979, a spate of high-profile cases of missing and murdered children stoked anxieties about the threats of child kidnapping and exploitation. Publicized through an emerging twenty-four-hour news…
James Shapiro, “Shakespeare in a Divided America” (Penguin, 2020)
Apr 29 • 70 min
In Shakespeare in a Divided America: What His Plays Tell Us About Our Past and Future (Penguin, 2020) renowned Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro turns his attention to the reception of Shakespeare in the US from the colonial period to the present. Shapiro…
Leslie M. Harris, “Slavery and the University: Histories and Legacies” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Apr 28 • 59 min
Slavery and the University: Histories and Legacies (University of Georgia Press, 2019), edited by Leslie M. Harris, James T. Campbell, and Alfred L. Brophy, is the first edited collection of scholarly essays devoted solely to the histories and legacies of…
Ünver Rüstem, “Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Apr 28 • 71 min
In Istanbul, there is a mosque on every hill. Cruising along the Bosphorus, either for pleasure, or like the majority of Istanbul’s denizens, for transit, you cannot help but notice that the city’s landscape would be dramatically altered without the…
Le’Trice D. Donaldson, “Duty Beyond the Battlefield: African American Soldiers Fight for Racial Uplift, Citizenship, and Manhood, 1870-1920” (SIUP, 2020)
Apr 28 • 74 min
In her new book Duty Beyond the Battlefield: African American Soldiers Fight for Racial Uplift, Citizenship, and Manhood, 1870-1920 (Southern Illinois University Press, 2020), Le’Trice D. Donaldson investigates how African American soldiers used their…
Martha Ackermann, “These Fevered Days: Ten Pivotal Moments in the Making of Emily Dickinson” (Norton, 2020)
Apr 28 • 56 min
After a life lived in obscurity, Emily Dickinson emerged after death as one of the greatest poets of her time. In These Fevered Days: Ten Pivotal Moments in the Making of Emily Dickinson (W. W. Norton, 2020), Martha Ackermann traces her evolution as a…
Chris Courtney, “The Nature of Disaster in China: The 1931 Yangzi River Flood” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Apr 28 • 61 min
For somewhat unfortunate reasons, many more people in the world now know about the existence and location of a city called Wuhan than was the case at the start of 2020. But most of these likely remain unaware of just how pivotal a role Wuhan has played in…
Great Books: Melissa Schwartzberg on Rousseau’s “The Social Contract”
Apr 28 • 60 min
“Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.” The opening sentence of 18th century philosopher Jean-Jacques Roussau’s The Social Contract poses a central question for all of us. Why do we live under conditions of inequality, violence, dependency and…
Danielle Ross, “Tatar Empire: Kazan’s Muslims and the Making of Imperial Russia” (Indiana UP, 2020)
Apr 27 • 71 min
In her new book Tatar Empire: Kazan’s Muslims and the Making of Imperial Russia (Indiana University Press, 2020), Danielle Ross looks at how the Tatars of Kazan participated in the formation of the Russian empire through their various activities in trade,…
Abraham Newman and Henry Farrell, “Of Privacy and Power: The Transatlantic Struggle over Freedom and Security” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Apr 27 • 43 min
We live in an interconnected world. People, goods, and services leap across borders like never before. Terrorist organizations, like al-Qaida, and digital platforms, like Facebook, have gone global. But, if problems straddle different national…
Valerie Hansen, “The Year 1000: When Explorers Connected the World — and Globalization Began” (Scribner, 2020)
Apr 24 • 49 min
Globalization is a modern phenomenon with a longer past than most people realize. As Valerie Hansen explains in her book The Year 1000: When Explorers Connected the World – and Globalization Began (Scribner, 2020), globalization became a reality a…
Peter La Chapelle, “I’d Fight the World: A Political History of Old-Time, Hillbilly, and Country Music” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Apr 24 • 60 min
Historians, musicologists, and sociologists have long studied the relationship between politics and music. Peter La Chapelle’s new book, I’d Fight the World: A Political History of Old-Time, Hillbilly, and Country Music (University of Chicago Press, 2019)…
Jeremy Black, “Military Strategy: A Global History” (Yale UP, 2020)
Apr 24 • 29 min
Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter University, is one of the most insightful historians of military strategy from early modernity to the present day. In his most recent book, Military Strategy: A Global History (Yale University Press, 2020), he…
A. B. Chastain and T. W. Lorek, “Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)
Apr 23 • 48 min
Emerging out of a 2016 conference, Andra Chastain and Timothy Lorek have brought together Environmental History, Latin American Studies, and Science and Technology Studies in a single volume that reshapes scholarly understandings of Latin America’s Long…
Adam H. Domby, “The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory” (U Virginia Press, 2020)
Apr 23 • 55 min
Adam H. Domby, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Charleston, has written a rigorous analysis of American political memory as it connects to the Civil War and long shadow of the Confederacy. The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and…
Eric Dursteler, “In the Sultan’s Realm: Two Venetian Reports on the Early Modern Ottoman Empire” (CRRS, 2018)
Apr 23 • 70 min
In the Sultan’s Realm: Two Venetian Reports on the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2018) is Professor Eric Dursteler’s translation of two final diplomatic reports (relazione) that Venetian ambassadors delivered…
Magda Teter, “Blood Libel: On the Trail of an Antisemitic Myth” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Apr 23 • 66 min
The myth of Jews killing Christian children emerged in 1144 CE, with the death of a boy named William in Norwich, England. Over the course of several centuries, this myth gained traction and became firmly rooted throughout medieval and early modern…
Jacob Blanc, “Before the Flood: The Itaipu Dam and the Visibility of Rural Brazil” (Duke UP, 2019)
Apr 22 • 50 min
Jacob Blanc’s Before the Flood: The Itaipu Dam and the Visibility of Rural Brazil (Duke University Press, 2019) tells the story of the the Itaipu dam, a massive hydroelectric complex built on the Brazil-Paraguay border in the 1970s and 1980s. The book is…
Elizabeth A. Cecil, “Mapping the Pāśupata Landscape” (Brill, 2020)
Apr 22 • 47 min
Elizabeth A. Cecil’s Mapping the Pāśupata Landscape: Narrative, Place, and the Śaiva Imaginary in Early Medieval North India (Brill, 2020) weaves together material from the Sanskrit text Skandapurāṇa, physical landscapes, inscriptions, monuments, and…
Susan Newcombe, “Yoga in Britain: Stretching Spirituality and Educating Yogis” (Equinox, 2019)
Apr 21 • 63 min
Paying special attention to sociocultural threads form the period 1945-1980, Susan Newcombe’s new book Yoga in Britain: Stretching Spirituality and Educating Yogis (Equinox, 2019) charts the trajectory of how yoga in became mainstream in Britain to the…
Christopher Tomlins, “In the Matter of Nat Turner: A Speculative History” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Apr 20 • 68 min
In 1831, Nat Turner led a band of Southampton County slaves in a rebellion that killed fifty-five whites, mostly women and children. After more than two months in hiding, Turner was captured, and quickly convicted and executed. Christopher Tomlins’ new…
Charles J. Holden, “Republican Populist: Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump’s America” (UVA Press, 2019)
Apr 20 • 61 min
Today Spiro Agnew is best known for his resignation from the vice presidency of the United States as part of a plea bargain deal related to a legal case involving bribes he took as a public official. In Republican Populist: Spiro Agnew and the Origins of…
Karl Qualls, “Stalin’s Niños: Educating Spanish Civil War Refugee Children in the Soviet Union, 1937-1951” (U Toronto Press, 2020)
Apr 17 • 60 min
Karl Qualls’ new book Stalin’s Niños: Educating Spanish Civil War Refugee Children in the Soviet Union, 1937-1951 (University of Toronto Press, 2020) examines how the Soviet Union raised and educated nearly 3,000 child refugees of the Spanish Civil War.…
Gregory Scott, “Building the Buddhist Revival: Reconstructing Monasteries in Modern China” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Apr 16 • 49 min
Gregory A. Scott’s Building the Buddhist Revival: Reconstructing Monasteries in Modern China (Oxford University Press, 2020) is the first major work in any language to address the topic of Buddhist monastery reconstructions. This book focuses on…
Cynthia Orozco, “Agent of Change: Adela Sloss-Vento, Mexican American Civil Rights Activist and Texas Feminist” (U Texas Press, 2020)
Apr 16 • 63 min
In Agent of Change: Adela Sloss-Vento, Mexican American Civil Rights Activist and Texas Feminist (University of Texas Press, 2020), Cynthia E. Orozco traces the life of Adela Sloss-Vento, a twentieth-century Mexican American woman civil rights activist in…
David Block, “Pastime Lost: The Humble, Original and Now Completely Forgotten Game of English Baseball” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Apr 15 • 57 min
Today we are joined by David Block, author of Pastime Lost: The Humble, Original and Now Completely Forgotten Game of English Baseball (University of Nebraska Press, 2019). Block is a baseball historian whose research has focused on the origins of the…
Mary Stanton, “Red, Black, White: The Alabama Communist Party, 1930–1950” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Apr 15 • 38 min
Mary Stanton’s Red, Black, White: The Alabama Communist Party, 1930–1950 (University of Georgia Press, 2019) is the first narrative history of the American communist movement in the South since Robin D. G. Kelley’s groundbreaking Hammer and Hoe and the…
Pankaj Jain, “Dharma in America: A Short History of Hindu-Jain Diaspora” (Routledge, 2019)
Apr 15 • 74 min
Pankaj Jain, Dharma in America: A Short History of Hindu-Jain Diaspora (Routledge, 2019) provides a concise history of Hindus and Jains in the Americas over the last two centuries, highlighting contributions to the economic and intellectual growth of the…
Lina Britto, “Marijuana Boom: The Rise and Fall of Colombia’s First Drug Paradise” (U California Press, 2020)
Apr 15 • 68 min
In her recently published book Marijuana Boom: The Rise and Fall of Colombia’s First Drug Paradise (University of California Press 2020), Lina Britto tells the forgotten story of the first boom in illicit drugs in the Greater Magdalena region of Colombia.…
Maddalena Marinari, “Unwanted: Italian and Jewish Mobilization against Restrictive Immigration Laws, 1882–1965” (UNC Press, 2020)
Apr 14 • 37 min
In the late nineteenth century, Italians and Eastern European Jews joined millions of migrants around the globe who left their countries to take advantage of the demand for unskilled labor in rapidly industrializing nations, including the United States.…
A Discussion with Kelly McFall about Using “Reacting to the Past” in College Courses
Apr 13 • 55 min
How best to teach history and, for that matter any social science subject, to college students? The traditional answer has been to lecture them. Given that the typical length of an attentive lecture-listener is about 15 minutes, this might not be the best…
Richard M. Gamble, “A Fiery Gospel: The Battle Hymn of the Republic and the Road to Righteous War” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Apr 13 • 41 min
America’s most famous hymn was created in very unusual circumstances. Julia Ward Howe had travelled close to the front line and had witnessed a skirmish between Union and Confederate troops. Returning to her hotel, she entered a reverie, and, as she later…
Asa McKercher, “Canada and the World since 1867” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Apr 10 • 63 min
If you haven’t been able to tell by the way I pronounce the word “about,” I should probably let you know that I’m from Canada. And I have to make a confession––growing up in Vancouver, I was fed the line that Canadian history was dull, that it lacked…
Gavriel Rosenfeld, “The Fourth Reich: The Specter of Nazism from World War II to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Apr 10 • 53 min
In his new book, The Fourth Reich: The Specter of Nazism from World War II to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Gavriel D. Rosenfeld reveals, for the first time, these postwar nightmares of a future that never happened and explains what they…
Katherine Franke, “Repair: Redeeming the Promise of Abolition” (Haymarket Books, 2020)
Apr 10 • 47 min
Katherine Franke’s ambitious new book challenges Americans to face our collective responsibility for ongoing racial inequality. Rather than fall back on what Franke calls a “palliative history” that emphasizes granting freedom and rights after the Civil…
Cassia Roth, “A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil” (Stanford UP, 2020)
Apr 10 • 72 min
Cassia Roth’s new book A Miscarriage of Justice: Women’s Reproductive Lives and the Law in Early Twentieth-Century Brazil (Stanford University Press, 2020) examines women’s reproductive health in relation to legal and medical policy in Rio de Janeiro,…
David G. Garcia, “Strategies of Segregation: Race, Residence, and the Struggle for Educational Equality” (U California Press, 2018)
Apr 9 • 60 min
Most Americans have a limited understanding of the history of segregation in the United States. While many are taught that segregation was as an institution of social control that dominated Southern society, economics, and politics from the late…
Brian A. Stauffer, “Victory on Earth or in Heaven: Mexico’s Religionero Rebellion” (U New Mexico Press, 2019)
Apr 9 • 61 min
In Victory on Earth or in Heaven: Mexico’s Religionero Rebellion (University of New Mexico Press, 2019), Brian A. Stauffer reconstructs the history of Mexico’s forgotten “Religionero” rebellion of 1873-1877, an armed Catholic challenge to the government…
Christopher Houston, “Istanbul, City of the Fearless: Urban Activism, Coup D’Etat, and Memory in Turkey” (U California Press, 2020)
Apr 9 • 63 min
Based on extensive field research in Turkey, Istanbul, Christopher Houston’s new book Istanbul, City of the Fearless: Urban Activism, Coup D’Etat, and Memory in Turkey (University of California Press, 2020) explores social movements and the broader…
Claudio Saunt, “Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory” (Norton, 2020)
Apr 8 • 46 min
The Trail of Tears, during which the United States violently expelled thousands of Indigenous peoples from their ancestral homelands in the southeast, was anything but inevitable. Nor was it not the only manifestation of the federal government’s hotly…
Knut A. Jacobsen, “Yoga in Modern Hinduism: Hariharānanda Āraṇya and Sāṃkhyayoga” (Routledge, 2017)
Apr 8 • 69 min
In his book Yoga in Modern Hinduism: Hariharānanda Āraṇya and Sāṃkhyayoga (Routledge, 2017), Knut A. Jacobsen examines the Kāpil Maṭh, a Sāṃkhyayoga institution emerging in the late nineteenth century Bengal. This movement (developing contemporaneously…
Tom Chaffin, “Revolutionary Brothers: Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette, and the Friendship that Helped Forge Two Nations” (St. Martins, 2019)
Apr 7 • 42 min
Of the many thousands who participated in the American and French revolutions in the late 18th century, only a handful played roles in both events. Among that select number were Thomas Jefferson and Gilbert du Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette, two men who…
Vincent Brown, “Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Apr 7 • 63 min
In the second half of the eighteenth century, as European imperial conflicts extended the domain of capitalist agriculture, warring African factions fed their captives to the transatlantic slave trade while masters struggled continuously to keep their…
Carole Fink, “West Germany and Israel: Foreign Relations, Domestic Politics and the Cold War” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Apr 7 • 61 min
In her new book, West Germany and Israel: Foreign Relations, Domestic Politics and the Cold War (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Carole Fink examines the relationship between West Germany and Israel. By the late 1960s, West Germany and Israel were…
Peter Fritzsche, “Hitler’s First Hundred Days: When Germans Embraced the Third Reich” (Basic Books, 2020)
Apr 6 • 64 min
We’ve grown to understand in the past few weeks how worlds can change in just a few days. Peter Fritzsche’s new book Hitler’s First Hundred Days: When Germans Embraced the Third Reich (Basic Books, 2020) is an extraordinary examination of how, in just a…
Alexander Watson, “The Fortress: The Siege of Przemysl and the Making of Europe’s Bloodlands” (Basic Books, 2020)
Apr 6 • 53 min
The opposing powers had already suffered casualties on a scale previously unimaginable by October 1914. On both the Western and Eastern fronts elaborate war plans lay in ruins and had been discarded in favour of desperate improvisation. In the West this…
Kate Imy, “Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Apr 3 • 70 min
In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of…
Owen Whooley, “On the Heels of Ignorance: Psychiatry and the Politics of Not Knowing” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Apr 3 • 62 min
Psychiatry has always aimed to peer deep into the human mind, daring to cast light on its darkest corners and untangle its thorniest knots, often invoking the latest medical science in doing so. But, as Owen Whooley’s sweeping new book tells us, peering…
Jon Piccini, “Human Rights in Twentieth-Century Australia” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Apr 3 • 69 min
After the Second World War, an Australian diplomat was one of eight people to draft the U.N. Declaration of Human Rights. And in the years that followed, Australians of many different stripes—including activists fighting for Aboriginal rights and women’s…
Alexander Mikaberidze, “The Napoleonic Wars: A Global History” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Apr 3 • 90 min
Austerlitz, Wagram, Borodino, Trafalgar, Leipzig, Waterloo: these are the battles most closely associated with the Napoleonic Wars. But how did this period of nearly continuous warfare affect the world beyond Europe? The immensity of the fighting waged by…
Arthur Asseraf, “Electric News in Colonial Algeria” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Apr 3 • 62 min
Arthur Asseraf’s Electric News in Colonial Algeria (Oxford University Press, 2019) examines the workings of the “news ecosystem” in Algeria from the 1880s to the beginning of the Second World War. The study of a society divided between a dominant…
Lane Windham, “Knocking on Labor’s Door: Union Organizing in the 1970s and the Roots of a New Economic Divide” (UNC Press, 2017)
Apr 3 • 44 min
Lane Windham, Associate Director of the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University, discusses her book, Knocking on Labor’s Door: Union Organizing in the 1970s and the Roots of a New Economic Divide (University of North…
Jeff Forret, “William’s Gang: A Notorious Slave Trader and his Cargo of Black Convicts” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Apr 2 • 49 min
Jeff Forret is the author of William’s Gang: A Notorious Slave Trader and his Cargo of Black Convicts, published by Cambridge University Press in 2020. William’s Gang explores the career of prominent slave trader William H. Williams, whose operation was…
Sanjib Baruah, “In the Name of the Nation: India and its Northeast” (Stanford UP, 2020)
Apr 2 • 67 min
Sanjib Baruah’s latest book In the Name of the Nation: India and its Northeast (Stanford University Press, 2020) completes a trilogy on India’s northeastern borderland region of which the first two are India Against Itself: Assam and the Politics of…
Margaret Hillenbrand, “Negative Exposures: Knowing What Not to Know in Contemporary China” (Duke UP, 2020)
Apr 2 • 61 min
The fact that secrecy and the concealment of information is important in today’s China is hardly a secret in itself, yet the ways that this secrecy is structured and sustained in such a vast society is not especially well understood. A lot more must be at…
Benjamin E. Park, “Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier” (Norton, 2020)
Apr 2 • 30 min
In Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier (W. W. Norton, 2020), Benjamin E. Park, an assistant professor at Sam Houston State University, examines a neglected part of the Mormon past — the establishment of a…
Paula C. Austin, “Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC: Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life” (NYU Press, 2019)
Apr 1 • 42 min
Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC: Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life (NYU Press, 2019) by Paula C. Austin, an Assistant Professor of history at Boston University, is not only a history of black youth in Washington D.C. in the 1930s but also a history of…
Brian A. Hatcher, “Hinduism Before Reform” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Apr 1 • 60 min
Did modern Hinduism truly emerge due to the “reforms” instigated by “progressive” colonial figures such as Rammohun Roy? Brian A. Hatcher’s new book Hinduism Before Reform (Harvard University Press, 2020) challenges this prevalent notion. Aimed at…
Kevin O’Connor, “The House of Hemp and Butter: A History of Old Riga” (NIUP, 2019)
Apr 1 • 62 min
Latvia’s elegant capital, Riga, is one of Europe’s best-kept secrets. Strategically located on the Eastern Baltic coast at the mouth of the River Daugava, Riga was founded in the early 13th century as a trading hub, a military outpost of the Holy Roman…
Kimberly A. Hamlin, “Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener” (Norton, 2020)
Apr 1 • 57 min
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating…
Gerald R. Gems, “Sport and the Shaping of Civic Identity in Chicago” (Lexington Books, 2020)
Mar 31 • 55 min
The city of Chicago is one of the US’ most diverse cosmopolitan areas. Given the array of people who live in the city, it is reasonable to assume that the goals of the various communities differ in regard to sport and its social functions. Gerald R. Gems’…
C. Wolbrecht and J. K. Corder, “A Century of Votes for Women: American Elections Since Suffrage” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Mar 31 • 47 min
Christina Wolbrecht and J. Kevin Corder have a new book that builds on their previous work exploring women and suffrage in the United States, Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal (Cambridge University Press, 2016). A…
Samuel Gregg, “Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization” (Gateway, 2019)
Mar 31 • 92 min
So what is Western Civilization, anyway? The term itself is under assault from progressives, as if the very notion is somehow passé and is not inclusive enough in a globalized world. But, the fact is, our daily lives in the U.S and throughout much of the…
Michael Fischbach, “The Movement and the Middle East: How the Arab-Israeli Conflict Divided the American Left” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Mar 30 • 47 min
One of the most divisive international issues in American politics today is over Israel and Palestine. The close ties between Israel and the United States are very strong and see considerable cooperation between the two countries. However, that…
G. Clinton Godart, “Darwin, Dharma, and the Divine: Evolutionary Theory and Religion in Modern Japan” (U Hawaii Press, 2017)
Mar 30 • 26 min
In Darwin, Dharma, and the Divine. Evolutionary Theory and Religion in Modern Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2017), G. Clinton Godart (Associate Professor at Tohoku University’s Department of Global Japanese Studies) brings to life more than a century…
Matt Cook, “Sleight of Mind: 75 Ingenious Paradoxes in Mathematics, Physics, and Philosophy” (MIT Press, 2020)
Mar 30 • 54 min
Paradox is a sophisticated kind of magic trick. A magician’s purpose is to create the appearance of impossibility, to pull a rabbit from an empty hat. Yet paradox doesn’t require tangibles, like rabbits or hats. Paradox works in the abstract, with words…
Adrian Currie, “Rock, Bone, and Ruin: An Optimist’s Guide to the Historical Sciences” (MIT Press, 2018)
Mar 27 • 54 min
The “historical sciences”—geology, paleontology, and archaeology—have made extraordinary progress in advancing our understanding of the deep past. How has this been possible, given that the evidence they have to work with offers mere traces of the past?…
David Stahel, “Retreat from Moscow: A New History of Germany’s Winter Campaign, 1941-1942” (FSG, 2019)
Mar 27 • 74 min
Germany’s winter campaign of 1941–1942 is commonly seen as the Wehrmacht’s first defeat. In Retreat from Moscow: A New History of Germany’s Winter Campaign, 1941-1942 (FSG, 2019), David Stahel argues that it was in fact their first strategic success in…
Jessica Wilkerson, “To Live Here, You Have to Fight: How Women Led Appalachian Movements for Social Justice” (U Illinois Press, 2018)
Mar 27 • 38 min
Jessica Wilkerson, Assistant Professor of History and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, discusses her book, To Live Here, You Have to Fight: How Women Led Appalachian Movements for Social Justice (University of Illinois Press, 2018) and…
Maurice Finocchiaro, “On Trial for Reason: Science, Religion, and Culture in the Galileo Affair” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Mar 26 • 64 min
In his new book On Trial for Reason: Science, Religion, and Culture in the Galileo Affair (Oxford University Press, 2019), Maurice Finocchiaro shows that there were (and are) really two Galileo “affairs.” Galileo’s original trial and condemnation forms…
Joseph E. Taylor III, “Persistent Callings: Seasons of Work and Identity on the Oregon Coast” (Oregon State UP, 2019)
Mar 26 • 51 min
George Perkins Marsh Prize winning environmental historian and geographer Joseph E. Taylor III’s new book, Persistent Callings: Seasons of Work and Identity on the Oregon Coast (Oregon State University Press, 2019), takes an innovative approach to the…
Adrian J. Boas, “The Crusader World” (Routledge, 2015)
Mar 25 • 50 min
The Crusader World (Routledge, 2015), edited by Adrian J. Boas, is a multidisciplinary survey of the current state of research in the field of crusader studies, an area of study which has become increasingly popular in recent years. In this volume Adrian…
Ahmet T. Kuru, “Islam, Authoritarianism, and Underdevelopment: A Global and Historical Comparison” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Mar 25 • 61 min
Ahmet T. Kuru’s new book Islam, Authoritarianism and Underdevelopment, A Global and Historical Comparison (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is a ground-breaking history and analysis of the evolution of the state in Muslim countries. Thoroughly researched…
Ezequiel Mercau, “The Falklands War: An Imperial History” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Mar 25 • 60 min
The Falklands War was in many ways the defining event in the premiership of Margaret Thatcher. In many ways it was also the last roar of the British Lion. An event shrouded in both nostalgia and patriotism, at the time and subsequently. In his book, The…
Tevi Troy, “Fight House: Rivalries in the White House from Truman to Trump” (Regnery History, 2020)
Mar 24 • 53 min
Washington Post best-selling presidential historian and former senior White House aide Tevi Troy examines some of the juiciest, nastiest, and most consequential internecine administration struggles in modern American history. In doing so, he not only…
Steven Seegel, “Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Mar 24 • 46 min
Steven Seegel’s Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2018) is an insightful contribution to the history of map making which is written through and by individual…
Norman A. Kutcher, “Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule” (U California Press, 2018)
Mar 23 • 74 min
Eunuchs. Nobody liked them, everybody seems to have hated them, but, even so, they were an essential part of many states – even in the Qing. Norman A. Kutcher’s book Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule (University of California Press, 2018)…
Joseph S. Nye, Jr., “In Do Morals Matter?: Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Mar 23 • 45 min
Americans since the beginning of their history, have constantly made moral judgments about presidents and foreign policy. Unfortunately, many of these assessments are poorly thought through and assessed. An American President is either praised for the…
Shoshana Keller, “Russia and Central Asia: Coexistence, Conquest, Convergence” (U Toronto Press, 2019)
Mar 22 • 67 min
Shoshana Keller’s new book, Russia and Central Asia: Coexistence, Conquest, Convergence (University of Toronto Press, 2019) provides an excellent introduction and overview of the history of Central Asia, from roughly the 14th century to the present.…
Marcus P. Nevius, “City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856” (U Georgia Press, 2020)
Mar 20 • 110 min
In his newly released book City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856 (University of Georgia Press, 2020), Professor Marcus P. Nevius (Assistant Professor of History and Africana Studies at the University of Rhode…
Nicholas R. Jones, “Staging Habla de Negros: Radical Performance of the African Diaspora in Early Modern Spain” (Penn State UP, 2019)
Mar 20 • 78 min
Nicholas R. Jones’s book, Staging Habla de Negros: Radical Performance of the African Diaspora in Early Modern Spain (Penn State University Press, 2019), analyzes white appropriations of black African voices in Spanish theater in the sixteenth through…
John Weber, “From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century” (UNC Press, 2015)
Mar 20 • 40 min
John Weber, Assistant Professor of History at Old Dominion University, discusses his book, From South Texas to the Nation: The Exploitation of Mexican Labor in the Twentieth Century(University of North Carolina Press, 2015), migrant agricultural labor,…
Spencer Dew, “The Aliites: Race and Law in the Religions of Noble Drew Ali” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Mar 20 • 79 min
In his dazzling new book The Aliites: Race and Law in the Religions of Noble Drew Ali (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Spencer Dew treats his readers to a riveting and often counterintuitive account of the interaction of law, race, and citizenship in…
Karima Moyer-Nocchi, “The Eternal Table: A Cultural History of Food in Rome” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
Mar 19 • 56 min
Karima Moyer-Nocchi is a professor of modern languages at the University of Siena and a lecturer for the Master in Culinary Studies program at the University of Rome, Tor Vergata. Her first book, Chewing the Fat – An Oral History of Italian Food from…
Jonathan Scott, “How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution, 1500-1800” (Yale UP, 2019)
Mar 19 • 27 min
Jonathan Scott is one of the most original interpreters of the early modern world. How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution, 1500-1800 (Yale University Press, 2019) is a deft and cogent synthesis in which Scott returns to the turbulent…
Mathias Haeussler, “Helmut Schmidt and British-German Relations: A European Misunderstanding” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Mar 19 • 37 min
The former West German chancellor Helmut Schmidt grew up as a devout Anglophile, yet he clashed heavily and repeatedly with his British counterparts Wilson, Callaghan, and Thatcher during his time in office between 1974 and 1982. Helmut Schmidt and…
Christopher J. Lee, “Unreasonable Histories: Nativism, Multiracial Lives, and the Genealogical Imagination in British Africa” (Duke UP, 2014)
Mar 19 • 84 min
In Unreasonable Histories: Nativism, Multiracial Lives, and the Genealogical Imagination in British Africa (Duke University Press, 2014), Christopher J. Lee recovers the forgotten experiences of multiracial peoples in the British colonies of Nyasaland,…
Jay Weiner, “Professor Berman: The Last Lecture of Minnesota’s Greatest Public Historian” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
Mar 18 • 52 min
In his latest book, journalist Jay Weiner details the extraordinary life of Professor Hy Berman. Written as an autobiography co-authored by Weiner, Professor Berman: The Last Lecture of Minnesota’s Greatest Public Historian (University of Minnesota Press,…
Melissa Kravetz, “Women Doctors in Weimar and Nazi Germany: Maternalism, Eugenics and Professional Identity” (U Toronto Press, 2019)
Mar 17 • 60 min
In her new book, Women Doctors in Weimar and Nazi Germany: Maternalism, Eugenics and Professional Identity (University of Toronto Press, 2019), Melissa Kravetz examines how German women physicians gained a foothold in the medical profession during the…
Nancy Sinkoff, “From Left to Right: Lucy S. Dawidowicz, the New York Intellectuals, and the Politics of Jewish History” (Wayne State UP, 2020)
Mar 17 • 59 min
From Left to Right: Lucy S. Dawidowicz, the New York Intellectuals, and the Politics of Jewish History (Wayne State University Press, 2020) is the first comprehensive biography of Dawidowicz (1915-1990), a pioneer historian in the field that is now called…
Paul Hanebrink, “A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Mar 16 • 37 min
In A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo-Bolshevism (Harvard University Press, 2018), Paul Hanebrink, Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Rutgers University, traces the complex history of the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism. Hanebrink shows how…
Alan Taylor, “Thomas Jefferson’s Education” (W. W. Norton, 2019)
Mar 16 • 35 min
Alan Taylor is the author of Thomas Jefferson’s Education published by W. W. Norton & Company in 2019. Thomas Jefferson’s Education tells the story of how Jefferson’s vision for educating the next generations of American came to be. Taking readers through…
Kirsten L. Ziomek, “Lost Histories: Recovering the Lives of Japan’s Colonial Peoples” (Harvard Asia Center. 2019)
Mar 16 • 70 min
Using diverse sources well beyond the colonial archive such as photographs, postcards, and even headstones, Dr. Kirsten L. Ziomek reveals the stories of colonial subjects in the Japanese empire in Lost Histories: Recovering the Lives of Japan’s Colonial…
Nancy Appelbaum, “Mapping the Country of Regions: The Chorographic Commission of Nineteenth-Century Colombia” (UNC Press, 2016)
Mar 13 • 59 min
In the mid-nineteenth century, the Chorographic Commission of Colombia, an ambitious geographical expedition, set out to define and map a nascent and still unstable republic. The commission’s purpose was to survey the land, its resources and people, and…
Michael O’Sullivan, “Disruptive Power: Catholic Women, Miracles, and Politics in Modern Germany, 1918-1965” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
Mar 13 • 77 min
How did Catholic mysticism shape politics and religion in 20th-century Germany? What do seers, stigmatics, and Marian apparitions reveal about broader cultural trends? Michael O’Sullivan’s award winning new book examines how longing for the divine…
Melissa Walker and Giselle Roberts, “Women’s Diaries and Letters of the South” (U South Carolina Press)
Mar 13 • 42 min
Professors Melissa Walker of Converse College and Giselle Roberts of Australia’s La Trobe University, editors of the Women’s Diaries and Letters of the South series, discuss the field of documentary editing and how the personal writings of southern women…
Paul J. Polgar, “Standard-Bearers of Equality: America’s First Abolition Movement” (UNC Press, 2019)
Mar 12 • 62 min
Paul J. Polgar is the author of Standard-Bearers of Equality: America’s First Abolition Movement, published by University of North Carolina Press in 2019. Standard-Bearers of Equality tells the story of a racially inclusive abolition movement which…
The Origins of World War One
Mar 12 • 67 min
Who or what originated and/or caused the Great War from breaking out in July 1914? Was it Serbia with its expansionist and aggressive designs on Austria-Hungary? Was it Austria-Hungary itself, unnecessarily plunging itself and the rest of Europe in a…
Elizabeth Goldring, “Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist” (Yale UP, 2019)
Mar 12 • 60 min
Limning – the painting of miniature portraits – was an important art form in 16th-century Europe. Among its greatest practitioners was Nicholas Hilliard, who enjoyed an international reputation for his skill in crafting the finely wrought images. In…
Jamie L. H. Goodall, “Pirates of the Chesapeake Bay: From the Colonial Era to the Oyster Wars” (The History Press, 2020)
Mar 11 • 47 min
The story of Chesapeake pirates and patriots begins with a land dispute and ends with the untimely death of an oyster dredger at the hands of the Maryland Oyster Navy. From the golden age of piracy to Confederate privateers and oyster pirates, the…
John Hardman, “Marie-Antoinette: The Making of a French Queen” (Yale UP, 2019)
Mar 11 • 75 min
Who was the real Marie-Antoinette? She was mistrusted and reviled in her own time, and today she is portrayed as a lightweight incapable of understanding the events that engulfed her. In this new account, Marie-Antoinette: The Making of a French Queen…
Steve Vogel, “Betrayal in Berlin: The True Story of the Cold War’s Most Audacious Espionage Operation” (Custom House, 2019)
Mar 11 • 61 min
In his new book Betrayal in Berlin: The True Story of the Cold War’s Most Audacious Espionage Operation (Custom House, 2019), Steve Vogel tells the astonishing true story of the Berlin Tunnel, one of the West’s greatest espionage operations of the Cold…
Cole Roskam, “Improvised City: Architecture and Governance in Shanghai, 1843-1937” (U Washington Press, 2019)
Mar 10 • 62 min
Shanghai’s role in shaping modern China and indeed the very idea of what modernity is in China can hardly be overstated. Much of this long-lasting influence can be seen in how the city itself came into being as a complex product of Chinese and colonial…
Sarah Burns, “The Politics of War Powers: The Theory and History of Presidential Unilateralism” (UP of Kansas, 2020)
Mar 9 • 50 min
Sarah Burns’ new book The Politics of War Powers: The Theory and History of Presidential Unilateralism (University Press of Kansas, 2020) pulls together distinct threads in analyzing the theoretical framing of presidential power in the American…
AfroAm Studies Roundtable: Robert Greene II and Tyler D. Parry on the Becoming Historians
Mar 9 • 69 min
Today, instead of discussing a new book, I am convening a “New Books in African American Studies Roundtable” to talk with two historians early in their careers about their recent transitions from graduate school into the professorate, and some of the…
Walter Nugent, “Color Coded: Party Politics in the American West, 1950–2016” (U Oklahoma Press, 2018)
Mar 9 • 52 min
The political West is far from monochrome, writes Walter Nugent in Color Coded: Party Politics in the American West, 1950–2016 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2018). Over the last half century and more, most of the states in the West have voted both…
Loretta E. Kim, “Ethnic Chrysalis: China’s Orochen People and the Legacy of Qing Borderland Administration” (Harvard Asia Center, 2019)
Mar 9 • 63 min
Ethnic Chrysalis: China’s Orochen People and the Legacy of Qing Borderland Administration (Harvard Asia Center, 2019) is the first monograph published in English on the early modern history of the Orochen, an ethnic group that has inhabited northeast Asia…
Larry Wolff, “Woodrow Wilson and the Reimagining of Eastern Europe” (Stanford UP, 2020)
Mar 6 • 58 min
At the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, where the victorious Allied powers met to reenvision the map of Europe in the aftermath of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson’s influence on the remapping of borders was profound. But it was his impact on the modern…
Adrian Wisnicki, “Fieldwork of Empire, 1840-1900: Intercultural Dynamics in the Production of British Expeditionary Literature” (Routledge, 2019)
Mar 6 • 34 min
Adrian Wisnicki talks about the British expeditionary literature of the late 1800s. Reading between the lines of Victorian travel accounts, Wisnicki sees outlines of a bigger story — local peoples, landscapes, and ways of life. Wisnicki is an Associate…
Steven Ross and Wolf Gruner, “New Perspectives on Krystallnacht” (Purdue UP, 2019)
Mar 5 • 61 min
It’s possible to organize a 20th-century German history course around the date 9 November. In 1918, Phillipp Schedemann proclaimed the creation of a new German Republic. In 1989, 9 November saw the opening of the Berlin Wall. In between, in 1938,…
Aimee Fox, “Learning to Fight: Military Innovation and Change in the British Army, 1914-1918” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Mar 5 • 34 min
Learning, innovation and adaptation are not concepts that we necessarily associate with the British Army of the First World War. Yet the need to learn from mistakes, to exploit new opportunities and to adapt to complex and novel situations are always…
Justin Nystrom, “Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture” (U Georgia Press, 2018)
Mar 5 • 59 min
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Justin Nystrom about his latest book, Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture, published in 2018 by the University of Georgia Press as part of the Southern Foodways…
Rebecca E. Zietlow, “The Forgotten Emancipator: James Mitchell Ashley and the Ideological Origins of Reconstruction” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Mar 5 • 53 min
Though the story of emancipation is well known in American history, the roles of many of the key figures involved in it are often overlooked. Among them is James Mitchell Ashley, the Ohio congressman who shepherded the Thirteenth Amendment through the…
Kathy Peiss, “The Information Hunters” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Mar 4 • 34 min
While armies have seized enemy records and rare texts as booty throughout history, it was only during World War II that an unlikely band of librarians, archivists, and scholars traveled abroad to collect books and documents to aid the military cause.…
Alex Hidalgo, “Trail of Footprints: A History of Indigenous Maps from Viceregal Mexico” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Mar 4 • 49 min
There is far more to a map than meets the eye. Such is the case in historian Alex Hidalgo’s Trail of Footprints: A History of Indigenous Maps from Viceregal Mexico (University of Texas Press, 2019), which focuses on the complex lives of dozens of Oaxacan…
Jeffrey James Byrne, “Mecca of Revolution: Algeria, Decolonization, and the Third World Order” (Oxford UP, 2016)
Mar 4 • 84 min
In his brilliant, category-smashing book, Mecca of Revolution: Algeria, Decolonization, and the Third World Order (Oxford University Press, 2016), Jeffrey James Byrne places Algeria at the center of many of the twentieth-century’s international dynamics:…
David Morton, “Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique” (Ohio UP, 2019)
Mar 3 • 91 min
Who built Africa’s cities? Going beyond the colonial archive and the planner’s gaze, David Morton’s Age of Concrete: Housing and the Shape of Aspiration in the Capital of Mozambique (Ohio University Press, 2019) describes the incremental process through…
Lana Dee Povitz, ​”Stirrings: How Activist New Yorkers Ignited a Movement for Food Justice” ​(UNC Press, 2019)
Mar 3 • 38 min
In the last three decades of the twentieth century, government cutbacks, stagnating wages, AIDS, and gentrification pushed ever more people into poverty, and hunger reached levels unseen since the Depression. In response, New Yorkers set the stage for a…
Diana Lemberg, “Barriers Down: How American Power and Free-Flow Policies Shaped Global Media” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Feb 28 • 49 min
Since the 1940s, America’s relations with the rest of the world have been guided by the idea of promoting the free flow of information. It’s an idea that seems benign, perhaps even difficult to argue against—who could possibly oppose the freedom of…
SherAli Tareen, “Defending Muhammad in Modernity” (U Notre Dame Press, 2020)
Feb 28 • 68 min
In his new book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020), SherAli Tareen, an associate professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College, takes us into the fascinating world of the ‘ulama (theologians) of the…
Ellen Griffith Spears, “Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town” (UNC Press, 2016)
Feb 28 • 32 min
Professor Ellen Griffith Spears of the University of Alabama, author of Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) discusses the decades long struggle for environmental and civil…
Sarah Abrevaya Stein, “A Sephardic Journey Through the Twentieth Century” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019)
Feb 28 • 50 min
In Family Papers: A Sephardic Journey Through the Twentieth Century (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), Sarah Abrevaya Stein weaves a narrative tapestry whose threads are drawn from the archives of one Sephardic family, with roots in the city of Salonica,…
Sher Banu Khan, “Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641-1699” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Feb 28 • 43 min
In her book, Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641-1699 (Cornell University Press, 2018), Sher Banu Khan provides a rare and empirically rich view of queenship in early modern maritime Southeast Asia. Four women ruled the Muslim…
Emily E. LB. Twarog, “Politics of the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in Twentieth-Century America” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Feb 26 • 40 min
The history of women’s political involvement has focused heavily on electoral politics, but throughout the twentieth century women engaged in grassroots activism when they found it increasingly challenging to feed their families and balance their…
Jürgen Melzer, “Wings for the Rising Sun: A Transnational History of Japanese Aviation” (Harvard UP, 2020)
Feb 26 • 45 min
Over the course of three decades Japan built an aircraft industry that by 1941 was qualitatively the equal of any in the world. In Wings for the Rising Sun: A Transnational History of Japanese Aviation (Harvard University Press, 2020), Jürgen Melzer…
Graham R. G. Hodges, “Black New Jersey 1664 to the Present Day” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
Feb 26 • 41 min
Black New Jersey 1664 to the Present Day (Rutgers University Press, 2018) by Graham Russell Gao Hodges, George Langdon, Jr. Professor of History and Africana and Latin American Studies at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, is a survey history of…
Phillipa Chong, “Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Feb 25 • 42 min
How does the world of book reviews work? In Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times (Princeton University Press, 2020), Phillipa Chong, assistant professor in sociology at McMaster University, provides a unique sociological analysis…
Ariella Aisha Azoulay, “Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism” (Verso, 2019)
Feb 24 • 51 min
Ariella Aisha Azoulay argues that the institutions that make our world, from archives and museums to ideas of sovereignty and human rights to history itself, are all dependent on imperial modes of thinking. Imperialism has segmented populations into…
Orly Clergé, “The New Noir: Race, Identity and Diaspora in Black Suburbia” (U California Press, 2019)
Feb 24 • 37 min
How has the expansion of the Black American middle class and the increase in the number of Black immigrants among them since the Civil Rights period transformed the cultural landscape of New York City? In her new book The New Noir: Race, Identity &…
Murad Idris, “War for Peace: Genealogies of a Violent Ideal in Western and Islamic Thought” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Feb 21 • 66 min
Murad Idris, a political theorist in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia, explores the concept of peace, the term itself and the way that it has been considered and analyzed in western and Islamic political thought. War…
Amy Shira Teitel, “Breaking the Chains of Gravity: The Story of Spaceflight Before NASA” (Bloomsbury, 2016)
Feb 21 • 30 min
Amy Shira Teitel talks about Apollo and the community of people who are deeply attached to space history. Teitel is a spaceflight historian and the creator of the YouTube Channel, Vintage Space. She is also the author of Breaking the Chains of Gravity:…
Bryant Simon, “The Hamlet Fire: A Story of Cheap Food, Cheap Government, and Cheap Lives” (The New Press, 2017)
Feb 21 • 36 min
Bryant Simon, Professor of History at Temple University, discusses his new book, The Hamlet Fire: A Story of Cheap Food, Cheap Government, and Cheap Lives (The New Press, 2017), and the tragic consequences of the ethos of “cheap” for workers, communities,…
Sohaira Siddiqui, “Law and Politics Under the Abbasids: An Intellectual Portrait of al-Juwayni” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Feb 21 • 47 min
In her intimidatingly brilliant new book Law and Politics Under the Abbasids: An Intellectual Portrait of al-Juwayni (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Sohaira Siddiqui conducts a masterful analysis of how conditions of political change and fragmentation…
Erika Denise Edwards, “Hiding in Plain Sight: Black Women, the Law, and the Making of a White Argentine Republic” (U Alabama Press, 2020)
Feb 21 • 72 min
Argentina promotes itself as a country of European immigrants. This makes it an exception to other Latin American countries, which embrace a more mixed—African, Indian, European—heritage. Hiding in Plain Sight: Black Women, the Law, and the Making of a…
Steve Suitts, “Overturning Brown: The Segregationist Legacy of the Modern School Choice Movement” (NewSouth Books, 2020)
Feb 21 • 31 min
School choice, widely touted as a system that would ensure underprivileged youth have an equal opportunity in education, has grown in popularity in the past fifteen years. The strategies and rhetoric of school choice, however, resemble those of…
L. Benjamin Rolsky, “The Rise and Fall of the Religious Left” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Feb 21 • 62 min
As someone who grew up watching All in the Family and Sanford and Son, I’ve long been familiar with Norman Lear and his work. What I didn’t know, as a young child sitting cross-legged in front of the TV set in the 1970s, was how prominent a political…
John Tweeddale, “John Calvin: For a New Reformation” (Crossway, 2019)
Feb 20 • 32 min
John Calvin continues to be the focus of a huge amount of scholarly attention. An annual bibliography records the thousands of items that are published every year on this most seminal of early modern religious thinkers. But how should readers navigate…
Sarah Stockwell, “The British End of the British Empire” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Feb 20 • 46 min
How did de-colonialization impact the United Kingdom itself? That is a topic that Professor of Imperial & Commonwealth History at King’s College, London, Sarah Stockwell aims to tackle in her latest book: The British End of the British Empire (Cambridge…
Eddie Michel, “The White House and White Africa” (Routledge, 2018)
Feb 19 • 40 min
The Rhodesian Unilateral Declaration of Independence was one of the last crises of formal imperialism. British settlers in present-day Zimbabwe, then known as Rhodesia, refused to accept demands from London that they accept requirements for majority rule…
Nicholas Blincoe, “More Noble Than War: A Soccer History of Israel-Palestine” (Bold Type Books, 2019)
Feb 19 • 61 min
Nicholas Blincoe’s More Noble Than War: A Soccer History of Israel-Palestine (Bold Type Books, 2019) is a beautifully narrated and written history of a century of conflict between pre-state Jews and Palestinians and Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinians…
Donald L. Miller, “Vicksburg: Grant’s Campaign that Broke the Confederacy” (Simon and Schuster, 2019)
Feb 19 • 88 min
In Vicksburg: Grant’s Campaign that Broke the Confederacy (Simon & Schuster, 2019), Donald L. Miller explains in great detail how Grant ultimately succeeded in taking the city and turning the tide of the war in favor of the Union. Miller begins his tale…
Yaakov Katz, “Shadow Strike: Inside Israel’s Secret Mission to Eliminate Syrian Nuclear Power” (St. Martin’s Press, 2019)
Feb 19 • 58 min
With the world’s attention riveted to the nuclear threat from Iran, Yaakov Katz’s new book could not be more timely. In Shadow Strike: Inside Israel’s Secret Mission to Eliminate Syrian Nuclear Power (St. Martin’s Press, 2019), Jerusalem Post…
Peter Cole, “Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area” (U Illinois Press, 2018)
Feb 19 • 69 min
Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area (University of Illinois Press, 2018) is a fascinating, densely researched account of dockworkers and their organized responses to seismic economic and technological changes in…
Maria Taroutina, “The Icon and the Square: Russian Modernism and the Russo-Byzantine Revival” (Penn State UP, 2018)
Feb 18 • 64 min
In The Icon and the Square: Russian Modernism and the Russo-Byzantine Revival (Penn State University Press, 2018), Maria Taroutina examines how the traditional interests of institutions such as the crown, the church, and the Imperial Academy of Arts…
Eric Lomazoff, “Reconstructing the National Bank Controversy: Politics and Law in the Early American Republic” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Feb 18 • 44 min
Eric Lomazoff has written a kind of detective novel about the national bank controversy during the early years of the new republic. Lomazoff poses, in the introduction, and at the start of each chapter, the general understanding that many scholars and…
Todd Shepard, “Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979” (U Chicago Press, 2017)
Feb 18 • 63 min
Departing from the bold and compelling claim that we cannot fully understand the histories of decolonization and the so-called “sexual revolution” apart from one another, Todd Shepard’s Sex, France, and Arab Men, 1962-1979 (University of Chicago Press,…
James N. Green, “Exile Within Exiles: Herbert Daniel Gay Brazilian Revolutionary” (Duke UP, 2018)
Feb 18 • 62 min
In Exile Within Exiles: Herbert Daniel Gay Brazilian Revolutionary (Duke University Press, 2018), James N. Green tells the story of Herbert Daniel, a significant and complex figure in Brazilian leftist revolutionary politics and social activism from the…
Christopher J. Shepherd, “Haunted Houses and Ghostly Encounters: Ethnography and Animism in East Timor, 1860-1975” (NIAS Press, 2019)
Feb 18 • 40 min
Anyone who tries to understand the history, religion, and especially the “culture” of Southeast Asia, will soon encounter the phenomenon of animism, the belief that landscapes, natural objects, trees and plants, animals, and deceased ancestors, possess…
Pilar M. Herr, “Contested Nation: The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in 19th-Century Chile” (U New Mexico Press, 2019)
Feb 18 • 58 min
Pilar M. Herr’s new book Contested Nation: The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in Nineteenth-Century Chile (University of New Mexico Press, 2019) places the independent Mapuche people and pro-Spanish Pincheira bandits at the heart of Chile’s…
Abigail Shinn, “Conversion Narratives in Early Modern England: Tales of Turning” (Palgrave, 2018)
Feb 17 • 34 min
Why did early modern people change their religious affiliation? And how did they represent that change in writing? In this outstanding new book, Conversion Narratives in Early Modern England: Tales of Turning (Palgrave, 2018), Abigail Shinn, who teaches…
Robin Pickering-Iazzi, “Dead Silent: Life Stories of Girls and Women Killed by the Italian Mafias, 1878-2018” (U Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 2019)
Feb 14 • 55 min
Robin Pickering-Iazzi’s Dead Silent: Life Stories of Girls and Women Killed by the Italian Mafias, 1878-2018 is the first history of its kind in English. An open access ebook, this study literally “unburies” the identities of over two-hundred girls and…
Slavery in World History
Feb 14 • 53 min
Notwithstanding the fact that slavery is almost as old if not older than human civilization itself, involving almost every country and continent on the face of the planet, the vast majority of scholarly attention tends to be focused on the North American…
Alistair Sponsel, “Darwin’s Evolving Identity: Adventure, Ambition, and the Sin of Speculation” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Feb 14 • 35 min
Dr. Alistair Sponsel talks about Darwin’s experiences on HMS Beagle and his early career as a naturalist. His close reading of Darwin’s journals and letters reveals insights about the man that would become known as the father of evolution. Sponsel is the…
Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, “Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy” (The New Press, 2018)
Feb 14 • 41 min
Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, Professors of History at California State University—Fresno, discuss their co-authored book, Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy (The New Press, 2018), competing narratives about…
Carol Zaleski, “The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings” (FSG, 2016)
Feb 13 • 62 min
Starting in the early 1930s, a small group of academics and writers met weekly in a pub in Oxford, England to discuss literature, religion, and ideas. Known as the Inklings, it was in part from their companionship that some of the greatest works of…
Rupert Lewis, “Marcus Garvey” (UP of West Indies, 2018)
Feb 13 • 81 min
Rupert Lewis has written a biography of Marcus Garvey published by the University Press of the West Indies in 2018. His book Marcus Garvey documents the forging of Garvey’s remarkable vision of pan-Africanism and highlights his organizational skills in…
Shai M. Dromi, “Above the Fray: The Red Cross and the Making of the Humanitarian NGO Sector” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Feb 13 • 44 min
How should we understand humanitarian NGOs? In Above the Fray: The Red Cross and the Making of the Humanitarian NGO Sector (University of Chicago Press, 2020), Shai M. Dromi, a lecturer in sociology at Harvard University, uses insights from cultural…
A. K. Sandoval-Strausz, “Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City” (Basic Books, 2019)
Feb 12 • 64 min
In A. K. Sandoval-Strausz’s recent work, Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City (Basic Books, 2019), ties together a magnificent story of Latinos migrating to Chicago and Dallas, and the positive effect immigration and cultural…
Ayelet Hoffman Libson, “Law and Self-Knowledge in the Talmud” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Feb 12 • 50 min
Law and Self-Knowledge in the Talmud (Cambridge UP, 2018) examines the emergence of self-knowledge as a determining legal consideration among the rabbis of Late Antiquity, from the third to the seventh centuries CE. Based on close readings of rabbinic…
Alex J. Kay and David Stahel, “Mass Violence in Nazi-Occupied Europe” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Feb 11 • 42 min
Alex J. Kay (senior lecture of History at Potsdam University in Berlin) and David Stahel (senior lecturer in History at the University of New South Wales in Canberra) have edited a groundbreaking series of articles on German mass killing and violence…
Mario T. García, “Father Luis Olivares, A Biography: Faith Politics and the Origins of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles” (UNC Press, 2018)
Feb 11 • 68 min
As the leader of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles during the 1980s, Father Luis Olivares brazenly defied local Catholic authorities and the federal government by publicly offering sanctuary to Central American migrants fleeing political violence and…
Julie MacArthur, “Dedan Kimathi on Trial: Colonial Justice and Popular Memory in Kenya’s Mau Mau Rebellion” (Ohio UP, 2017)
Feb 11 • 61 min
In 2015, University of Toronto professor Julie MacArthur decided to follow a couple more leads in the search for the long-missing, feared-lost transcript of the trial of legendary Mau Mau leader Dedan KImathi. She found herself amidst the papers of an…
Roger Gilles, “Women on the Move: The Forgotten Era of Women’s Bicycle Racing” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Feb 11 • 61 min
Today we are joined by Roger Gilles, Director of the Honors College and Professor of Writing at Grand Valley State University, and author of Women on the Move: The Forgotten Era of Women’s Bicycle Racing (University of Nebraska Press, 2018). In our…
Peter J. Boettke, “F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
Feb 10 • 49 min
Today I spoke with professor Peter J. Boettke the author of a great new book on Friedrich August von Hayek. Dr. Boettke is University Professor of Economics and Philosophy, Director of the F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics,…
Megan Kate Nelson, “The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West” (Scribner, 2019)
Feb 10 • 72 min
What did the American Civil War look like from Diné Bikéyah and Apacheria? This is just one of the many questions that drives historian Megan Kate Nelson’s The Three-Cornered War: The Union, The Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West…
Alan Gallay, “Walter Ralegh: Architect of Empire” (Basic Books, 2019)
Feb 10 • 87 min
Sir Walter Ralegh was a favorite of Queen Elizabeth. She showered him with estates and political appointments. He envisioned her becoming empress of a universal empire. She gave him the opportunity to lead the way. In Walter Ralegh: Architect of Empire…
Timothy Barnard, “Imperial Creatures: Humans and Other Animals in Colonial Singapore, 1819-1942” (NUS Press, 2019)
Feb 7 • 45 min
In Imperial Creature: Humans and Other Animals in Colonial Singapore, 1819-1942 (National University of Singapore Press, 2019), Timothy Barnard explores the more-than-human entanglements between empires and the creatures they govern. What is the…
Jonathan A. C. Brown, “Slavery and Islam” (Oneworld Academic, 2019)
Feb 7 • 71 min
In his majestic and encyclopedic new book Slavery and Islam (Oneworld Academic, 2019), Jonathan A. C. Brown presents a sweeping analysis of Muslim intellectual, political, and social entanglements with slavery, and some of the thorniest conceptual and…
Howard Jones, “My Lai: Vietnam, 1968, and the Descent into Darkness” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Feb 7 • 78 min
In his book My Lai: Vietnam, 1968, and the Descent into Darkness (Oxford UP, 2017), Dr. Howard Jones describes how on March 16th, 1968, several units of American soldiers descended upon a collection of small villages in Central Vietnam, now collectively…
Blain Roberts, “Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South” (UNC Press, 2016)
Feb 7 • 38 min
Professor Blain Roberts of California State University, Fresno, talks about intersections of race, identity, and memory in the South in a wide-ranging discussion that starts in the segregated beauty parlors of the Jim Crow era and ends with remembrances…
Michael F. Robinson, “The Coldest Crucible: Arctic Exploration and American Culture” (U Chicago Press, 2006)
Feb 7 • 39 min
Radio host Kevin Fox interviews Michael F. Robinson about the history of American Arctic exploration, the subject of his book, The Coldest Crucible: Arctic Exploration and American Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2006). The disappearance of the…
Christian J. Koot, “A Biography of a Map in Motion: Augustine Herrman’s Chesapeake” (NYU Press, 2017)
Feb 6 • 25 min
Labels on a map: Surrey. Lower Norfolk. The Isle of Wight. Northumberland. Middlesex. Not a map England, but of the British colonies of Virginia and Maryland published in 1673. This is a map that proclaims empire: from the prominent royal arms, to the…
Michael Bobelian, “Battle for the Marble Palace: Abe Fortas, Earl Warren, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon and the Forging of the Modern Supreme Court” (Schaffner, 2019)
Feb 5 • 58 min
Michael Bobelian has written a history of the nomination of Abe Fortas to be Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1968. In Battle for the Marble Palace: Abe Fortas, Earl Warren, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon and the Forging of the Modern Supreme…
Matthew Goodman, “The City Game: Triumph, Scandal, and a Legendary Basketball Team” (Ballantine Books, 2019)
Feb 5 • 50 min
The 1949-50 CCNY Beavers basketball team were one of the unlikeliest of champions in sports history. CCNY was a tuition-free in Harlem, New York, intended to give working class students the best education possible. The school was comprised of minorities,…
R. Scott Huffard, Jr., “Redemption: Railroads and the Reconstruction of Capitalism in the New South” (UNC Press, 2019)
Feb 5 • 37 min
R. Scott Huffard Jr. is the author of Engines of Redemption: Railroads and the Reconstruction of Capitalism in the New South, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2019. Engines of Redemption is a fascinating history of capitalism in the…
Christopher Frank, “Workers, Unions and Payments in Kind: The Fight for Real Wages in Britain, 1820-1914” (Routledge, 2020)
Feb 5 • 55 min
The passage of the 1831 Truck Act was intended to end throughout the United Kingdom the practice of paying employees in truck, or goods, rather than in money. As Christopher Frank reveals in Workers, Unions and Payments in Kind: The Fight for Real Wages…
D. J. Taylor, “The Lost Girls: Love and Literature in Wartime London” (Pegasus Books, 2020)
Feb 4 • 23 min
Who were the Lost Girls? All coming from broken or failed Upper-middle Class families; the Lost Girls were all chic, glamorous, and bohemian, as likely to be found living in a rat-haunted maisonette as dining at the Ritz, Lys Lubbock, Sonia Brownell,…
Alex Dika Seggerman, “Modernism on the Nile: Art in Egypt between the Islamic and the Contemporary” (UNC Press, 2019)
Feb 4 • 42 min
With scholarship in the discipline of history witnessing a shift toward global approaches to local historical processes, new questions are being raised about how to identify commensurate theoretical methods and conceptual frameworks for analysis – with…
Penny Sinanoglou, “Partitioning Palestine: British Policymaking at the End of Empire” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Feb 3 • 56 min
Partitioning Palestine: British Policymaking at the End of the Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2019) is the first history of the ideological and political forces that led to the idea of partition—that is, a division of territory and sovereignty—in…
Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, “Racial Migrations: New York City and the Revolutionary Politics of the Spanish Caribbean” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Feb 3 • 64 min
In the late nineteenth century, a small group of Cubans and Puerto Ricans of African descent settled in the segregated tenements of New York City. At an immigrant educational society in Greenwich Village, these early Afro-Latino New Yorkers taught…
Paul Lay, “Providence Lost: The Rise and Fall of Cromwell’s Protectorate” (Head of Zeus, 2020)
Feb 3 • 41 min
In today’s episode, we catch up with Paul Lay, editor of the leading journal History Today, and a senior research fellow in early modern history at the University of Buckingham. Paul is the author of a brilliant new account of the British republic.…
Catherine Newell, “Destined for the Stars: Faith, the Future, and America’s Final Frontier” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2017)
Jan 31 • 38 min
Catherine Newell talks about the religious roots of the final frontier, focusing on the collaboration of artist Chesley Bonestell, science writer Willy Ley, and the NASA rocket engineer Wernher von Braun. Newell is an assistant professor of religion and…
Peter Bergamin, “The Making of the Israeli Far-Right: Abba Ahimeir and Zionist Ideology” (I. B. Tauris, 2019)
Jan 31 • 37 min
Peter Bergamin’s, new book, The Making of the Israeli Far-Right: Abba Ahimeir and Zionist Ideology (I. B. Tauris, 2019), is an intellectual biography of one of the most important propagators of the Maximalist Revisionist stream in Zionism ideology. The…
Jacob Remes, “Disaster Citizenship: Survivors, Solidarity, and Power in the Progressive Era” (U Illinois Press, 2015)
Jan 31 • 41 min
Professor Jacob Remes of SUNY Empire State College discusses his book, Disaster Citizenship: Survivors, Solidarity, and Power in the Progressive Era (University of Illinois Press, 2015), and challenges prevailing assumptions about how ordinary people,…
Eric Setzekor, “The Rise and Fall of an Officer Corps: The Republic of China Military, 1942-1955” (U Oklahoma Press, 2018)
Jan 30 • 59 min
Following the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911, two antipodal ideologies vied for control of China’s military. The first, advanced by Sun Yat-sen, leader of the Kuomintang (KMT), maintained that the military was little more than an organ of the KMT party…
K. Linder et al., “Going Alt-Ac: A Guide to Alternative Academic Careers” (Stylus Publishing, 2020)
Jan 30 • 39 min
If you’re a grad student facing the ugly reality of finding a tenure-track job, you could easily be forgiven for thinking about a career change. However, if you’ve spent the last several years working on a PhD, or if you’re a faculty member whose career…
Catherine A. Stewart, “Long Past Slavery: Representing Race in the Federal Writers’ Project” (UNC Press, 2016)
Jan 30 • 73 min
Catherine A. Stewart is the author of Long Past Slavery: Representing Race in the Federal Writers’ Project, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2016. Long Past Slavery examines the history behind the collection of more than 2,300…
Gregory P. Downs, “The Second American Revolution: The Civil War-Era Struggle over Cuba and the Rebirth of the American Republic” (UNC Press, 2019)
Jan 29 • 72 min
Much of the confusion about a central event in United States history begins with the name the “Civil War.” In reality, the Civil War was not merely civil—meaning national—and not merely a war, but instead an international conflict of ideas as well as…
Salvador Salinas, “Land, Liberty, and Water: Morelos After Zapata, 1920-1940” (U Arizona Press, 2018)
Jan 29 • 43 min
In Land, Liberty, and Water: Morelos After Zapata, 1920-1940 (University of Arizona Press, 2018), Salvador Salinas fills an important gap in the history of the Zapatista Revolution in Morelos - namely, what happened after 1920. In this meticulously…
Mark Gamsa, “Manchuria: A Concise History” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Jan 29 • 51 min
The term ‘Manchuria’ conjures up all manner of evocative associations for people interested in East Asian and world history, from the Manchu founders of China’s last imperial dynasty, to Russian railroads and Japanese empire on the Asian mainland. Up to…
Christopher J. Phillips, “Scouting and Scoring: How We Know What We Know About Baseball” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jan 29 • 45 min
The so-called Sabermetrics revolution in baseball that began in the 1970s, popularized by the book—and later Hollywood film—Moneyball, was supposed to represent a triumph of observation over intuition. Cash-strapped clubs need not compete for hyped-up…
Andrew R. M. Smith, “No Way But To Fight: George Foreman and the Business of Boxing” (U Texas Press, 2020)
Jan 28 • 60 min
Today we are joined by Andrew R. M. Smith, author of No Way But To Fight: George Foreman and the Business of Boxing (University of Texas Press, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed Foreman’s career, the role of race in American sports, and how boxing…
Keri Holt, “Reading These United States: Federal Literacy in the Early Republic, 1776-1830” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Jan 27 • 37 min
Keri Holt is the author of Reading These United States: Federal Literacy in the Early Republic, 1776-1830, published by the University of Georgia Press in 2019. Reading These United States explores how Americans read, saw, and understood the federal…
Scott C. Esplin, “Return to the City of Joseph: Modern Mormonism’s Contest for the Soul of Nauvoo” (U Illinois Press, 2019)
Jan 27 • 62 min
In the mid-twentieth century, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) returned to Nauvoo, Illinois, home to the thriving religious community led by Joseph Smith before his murder in 1844. The quiet farm town became a major Mormon heritage…
Jeremy Black, “Geographies of an Imperial Power: The British World, 1688-1815” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Jan 24 • 29 min
Today we talk to Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter University, UK, about two of his most recent book projects, both of which relate to the ways in which we think about empires, and the British empire in particular. Geographies of an Imperial…
Carol Dyhouse, “Hearthrobs: A History of Women and Desire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Jan 24 • 31 min
What can a cultural history of the heartthrob teach us about women, desire, and social change? From dreams of Prince Charming or dashing military heroes, to the lure of dark strangers and vampire lovers; from rock stars and rebels to soulmates, dependable…
Adrienne Petty, “Standing Their Ground: Small Farmers in North Carolina Since the Civil War” (Oxford UP, 2013)
Jan 24 • 43 min
Professor Adrienne Petty discusses her book, Standing Their Ground: Small Farmers in North Carolina Since the Civil War (Oxford University Press, 2013), the black and white farmers in the South who were part of the “small farming class,” and their…
Ian Wray, “No Little Plans: How Government Built America’s Wealth and Infrastructure” (Routledge, 2019)
Jan 23 • 54 min
Is planning for America anathema to the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness? Is it true, as thinkers such as Friedrich Von Hayek, Milton Friedman, and Ayn Rand have claimed, that planning leads to dictatorship, that the state is economically…
Emily Colbert Cairns, “Esther in Early Modern Iberia and the Sephardic Diaspora: Queen of the Conversas” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
Jan 23 • 54 min
Emily Colbert Cairns’ book, Esther in Early Modern Iberia and the Sephardic Diaspora: Queen of the Conversas (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), traces the biblical figure of Esther, the secret Jewish Queen, as she is reinvented as the patron saint for the early…
Wulf Gruner, “The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia: Czech Initiatives, German Policies, Jewish Responses” (Berghahn Books, 2019)
Jan 23 • 63 min
Holocaust research tends to concentrate on certain geographic regions. We know much about the Holocaust in Poland, Germany and Western Europe. We are learning more and more about the ‘Holocaust by Bullets’ in the territories of the Soviet Union. This is…
James D. Bratt, “A Christian and a Democrat: A Religious Biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt” (Eerdmans, 2019)
Jan 23 • 58 min
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, when asked at a press conference about the roots of his political philosophy, responded simply, “I am a Christian and a Democrat.” This new book is the story of how the first informed the second—how his upbringing in the…
Astrid M. Eckert, “West Germany and the Iron Curtain: Environment, Economy, and Culture in the Borderlands” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jan 22 • 63 min
How did the Iron Curtain shape the Federal Republic of Germany? How did the internal border become a proving ground for rival ideologies? West Germany and the Iron Curtain: Environment, Economy, and Culture in the Borderlands (Oxford University Press…
Lauren Working, “The Making of an Imperial Polity: Civility and America in the Jacobean Metropolis” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Jan 22 • 31 min
In his Relation of the second voyage to Guiana, published in 1596, George Chapman put the imperial ambitions of England into a telling verse couplet. ‘Riches, and Conquest, and Renowne I sing. / Riches with honour, Conquest without bloud’. For the…
James M. Banner, Jr., “Presidential Misconduct: From George Washington to Today” (The New Press, 2019)
Jan 22 • 52 min
What standard should be used to assess presidential misconduct during the Trump presidency? How should the public, press, Congress, and bureaucracy resist and punish executive misconduct? Presidential Misconduct: From George Washington to Today (The New…
Ariel Mae Lambe, “No Barrier Can Contain It: Cuban Antifascism and the Spanish Civil War” (UNC Press, 2019)
Jan 22 • 70 min
Ariel Mae Lambe’s new book No Barrier Can Contain It: Cuban Antifascism and the Spanish Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2019) is a history of transnational Cuban activists who mobilized in the mid-1930s to fight fascism both in Cuba and…
J. L. Anderson, “Capitalist Pigs: Pigs, Pork, and Power in America” (West Virginia UP, 2019)
Jan 21 • 58 min
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with J. L. Anderson about the 2019 book Capitalist Pigs: Pigs, Pork, and Power in America published by West Virginia University Press. Anderson provides a history of pigs in America from the first arrival on…
Rachel Chrastil, “How to Be Childless: A History and Philosophy of Life Without Children” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jan 21 • 36 min
In this episode, Jana Byars talks with Rachel Chrastil, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and member of the history department at Xavier University, about her newest book, How to Be Childless: A History and Philosophy of Life Without Children (Oxford…
Brian Cervantez, “Amon Carter: A Lone Star Life” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
Jan 21 • 56 min
Raised in a one-room log cabin in a small North Texas town, Amon G. Carter (1879–1955) rose to become the founder and publisher of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, a seat of power from which he relentlessly promoted the city of Fort Worth, amassed a fortune,…
Jane H. Hong, “Gates to Asia: A Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion” (UNC Press, 2019)
Jan 17 • 48 min
Over the course of less than a century, the U.S. transformed from a nation that excluded Asians from immigration and citizenship to one that receives more immigrants from Asia than from anywhere else in the world. Yet questions of how that dramatic shift…
Benjamin Dangl, “The Five Hundred Year Rebellion: Indigenous Movements and the Decolonization of History in Bolivia” (AK Press, 2019)
Jan 17 • 53 min
Moments before his death at the hands of Spanish colonial officials on November 15, 1781, Aymaran leader Túpac Katari assured his apostles as well as his adversaries that he would “return as millions.” As promised, Katari’s presence in Bolivia did not end…
Blake Perkins, “Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks” (U Illinois Press, 2017)
Jan 17 • 41 min
Blake Perkins, assistant professor of history at Williams Baptist College, discusses his new book, Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks (University of Illinois Press, 2017), regional relations with the federal…
Daniel Kennefick, “No Shadow of Doubt: The 1919 Eclipse that Confirmed Einstein’s Theory of Relativity” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jan 17 • 39 min
Daniel Kennefick talks about resistance to relativity theory in the early twentieth century and the huge challenges that faced British astronomers who wanted to test the theory during the solar eclipse of 1919. Kennefick is an associate professor of…
Filippo Marsili, “Heaven Is Empty: A Cross-Cultural Approach to ‘Religion’ and Empire in Ancient China” (SUNY Press, 2018)
Jan 17 • 78 min
Heaven Is Empty: A Cross-Cultural Approach to ‘Religion’ and Empire in Ancient China (SUNY Press, 2018) offers a new comparative perspective on the role of the sacred in the formation of China’s early empires (221 BCE–9 CE) and shows how the unification…
Lori Gemeiner-Bihler, “Cities of Refuge: German Jews in London and New York, 1935-1945” (SUNY Press, 2019)
Jan 16 • 66 min
In the years following Hitler’s rise to power, German Jews faced increasingly restrictive antisemitic laws, and many responded by fleeing to more tolerant countries. Cities of Refuge: German Jews in London and New York, 1935-1945 (SUNY Press, 2019),…
Dr. Alice Collett, “Lives of Early Buddhist Nuns: Biographies as History” (Oxford UP, 2016)
Jan 16 • 66 min
Dr. Alice Collett’s monograph Lives of Early Buddhist Nuns: Biographies as History (Oxford University Press, 2016) delves into the lives of six of the best-known nuns from the period of early Buddhism: Dhammadinnā, Khemā, Kisāgotamī, Paṭācārā, Bhaddā…
Jessica Lynne Pearson, “The Colonial Politics of Global Health: France and the United Nations in Postwar Africa” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Jan 15 • 48 min
International organizations throw up several obstacles—their immense scale, their dry bureaucratic language—to the historian trying to piece together their past. In her book, The Colonial Politics of Global Health: France and the United Nations in Postwar…
Jonathan Erickson, “Imagination in the Western Psyche: From Ancient Greece to Modern Neuroscience” (Routledge, 2019)
Jan 15 • 89 min
Imagination is one of the most important elements of being human, but is most often assumed we know what it is, while rarely being analyzed. Here with me today is Jonathan Erickson to discuss his recent book Imagination in the Western Psyche: From Ancient…
Eileen Botting, “The Wollstonecraftian Mind” (Routledge, 2019)
Jan 15 • 68 min
Eileen Hunt Botting is Professor of Political Science at Notre Dame and co-editor with Sandrine Berges and Alan Coffee of the anthology The Wollstonecraftian Mind (Routledge, 2019). The collection presents thirty-nine essays from distinguished scholars in…
Benjamin Balint, “Jerusalem: City of the Book” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jan 15 • 45 min
“The library is a gathering pool of narratives and of the people who come to find them. It is where we can glimpse immortality; in the library, we can live forever.” ― Susan Orlean, The Library Book. Benjamin Balint and Merav Mack’s Jerusalem: City of the…
Kim A. Wagner, “Amritsar 1919: An Empire of Fear and the Making of a Massacre” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jan 15 • 76 min
You’ve probably seen the film Gandhi and you likely think that you know all about the Amritsar Massacre of 1919. After all, Richard Attenborough’s 1982 academy award winning film did an incredible job of recreating every detail of Brigadier-General…
Rachel Louise Moran, “Governing Bodies: American Politics and the Shaping of the Modern Physique” (U Penn Press, 2018)
Jan 14 • 50 min
How did the modern, American body come into being? According to Rachel Louise Moran this is a story to be told through the lens of the advisory state. In her book, Governing Bodies: American Politics and the Shaping of the Modern Physique (University of…
Tobias Boes, “Thomas Mann’s War: Literature, Politics, and the World Republic of Letters” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jan 14 • 89 min
In Thomas Mann’s War: Literature, Politics, and the World Republic of Letters (Cornell University Press, 2019), Tobias Boes traces how the acclaimed and bestselling author became one of America’s most prominent anti-fascists and the spokesperson for a…
Gonzalo Lamana, “How ‘Indians’ Think: Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory” (U Arizona Press, 2019)
Jan 14 • 48 min
In his new book, How “Indians” Think: Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory (University of Arizona Press, 2019), Dr. Gonzalo Lamana carefully investigates the writings of Indigenous intellectuals of the Andean region…
Arbella Bet-Shlimon, “City of Black Gold: Oil, Ethnicity, and the Making of Modern Kirkuk” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jan 14 • 55 min
In her debut book, City of Black Gold: Oil, Ethnicity, and the Making of Modern Kirkuk (Stanford University Press, 2019), Arbella Bet-Shlimon explores the vibrant and often troubled history of one of Iraq’s most diverse and oil-rich cities. Bet-Shlimon…
Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, “Sisters and Rebels: A Struggle for the Soul of America” (W. W. Norton, 2019)
Jan 14 • 40 min
Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in…
Judi Rever, “In Praise of Blood: The Crimes of the Rwandan Patriotic Front” (Random House, 2018)
Jan 14 • 61 min
Judi Rever’s In Praise of Blood: The Crimes of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (Random House, 2018) is investigative journalism at its finest. Through great personal risk to so many of those involved, Rever and her sources tell a story far different from the…
Alyssa M. Park, “Sovereignty Experiments: Korean Migrants and the Building of Borders in Northeast Asia, 1860-1945” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jan 13 • 68 min
Even in states where borders and sovereignty are supposedly well established, large movements of transnational migrants are seen to present problems, as today’s crises show the world over. But as Alyssa Park’s book Sovereignty Experiments: Korean Migrants…
Christopher Cameron, “Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism” (Northwestern UP, 2019)
Jan 13 • 48 min
Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African…
Graham T. Clews, “Churchill’s Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration” (Naval Institute Press, 2019)
Jan 13 • 60 min
Given the overwhelming amount of books printed in the past ten years on various (usually rather obscure) aspects of Sir Winston Churchill’s glorious career, it is of great interest that so little has been written about his activity during the Phoney War…
Nick Yablon, “Remembrance of Things Present: The Invention of the Time Capsule” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jan 13 • 60 min
In Remembrance of Things Present: The Invention of the Time Capsule (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Nick Yablon traces the birth of the time capsule in the United States. Starting with the Gilded Age, Yablon explores the way Americans from diverse…
Jerome Gellman, “The History of Evil from the Mid-Twentieth Century to Today: 1950-2018” (Routledge, 2018)
Jan 10 • 51 min
“The imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth” – Genesis 8:21 “The evil that men do lives after them, the good is oft interred with their bones.” - William Shakespeare We share with other animals the experiences of violence; of pain, fear and…
Ingrid Horrocks, “Women Wanderers and the Writing of Mobility, 1784–1814” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jan 10 • 33 min
Ingrid Horrocks talks about the way women travelers, specifically women wanderers, are represented in late-eighteenth century literature, particularly in the work of women writers. Horrocks in an associate professor in the School of English and Media…
Chad Pearson, “Reform or Repression: Organizing America’s Anti-Union Movement” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2015)
Jan 10 • 36 min
Professor Chad Pearson of Collin College, author of Reform or Repression: Organizing America’s Anti-Union Movement (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) traces the roots of modern anti-unionism in the U.S. to the early 20th century open shop movement…
Lori Cox Han, “Advising Nixon: The White House Memos of Patrick J. Buchanan” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Jan 9 • 36 min
Political Scientist and presidential expert Lori Cox Han has written an absorbing analysis of the many, many memos that Pat Buchanan wrote while working in Richard Nixon’s White House. Buchanan was in the Nixon White House from the very beginning until…
Sarah Wobick-Segev, “Homes Away from Home: Jewish Belonging in 20th-Century Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Jan 9 • 71 min
In pre-emancipation Europe, most Jews followed Jewish law most of the time, but by the turn of the twentieth century, a new secular Jewish identity had begun to take shape. How did Jews go from lives organized by synagogues, shul, and mikvehs to lives…
Brendan Simms, “Hitler: A Global Biography” (Basic Books, 2019)
Jan 8 • 29 min
Every generation returns to the titanic heroes and villains of the 20th century. And every generation produces a new set of biographies—often immense—in an effort to understand the role of that eras main figures. In the past three years, three important…
Lydia Barnett, ”After the Flood: Imagining the Global Environment in Early Modern Europe” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Jan 8 • 44 min
Many centuries before the emergence of the scientific consensus on climate change, people began to imagine the existence of a global environment: a natural system capable of changing humans and of being changed by them. In After the Flood: Imagining the…
Yaacob Dweck, “Dissident Rabbi: The Life of Jacob Sasportas” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jan 8 • 51 min
In 1665, Sabbetai Zevi, a self-proclaimed Messiah with a mass following throughout the Ottoman Empire and Europe, announced that the redemption of the world was at hand. As Jews everywhere rejected the traditional laws of Judaism in favor of new norms…
Leor Halevi, “Modern Things on Trial: Islam’s Global and Material Reformation in the Age of Rida, 1865-1935” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Jan 7 • 52 min
How did Muslims respond to foreign goods in an age characterized by global exchange and European imperial expansion? What sort of legal reasoning did scholars apply in order to appropriate – or reject – items like the synthetic toothbrush, toilet paper,…
Joe Miller, “US of AA: How the Twelve Steps Hijacked the Science of Alcoholism” (Chicago Review Press, 2019)
Jan 7 • 51 min
In the aftermath of Prohibition, America’s top scientists joined forces with members of a new group, called Alcoholics Anonymous, and put their clout behind a campaign to convince the nation that alcoholism was a disease rather than a moral failing. Their…
Raj Patel, “A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things” (U California Press, 2017)
Jan 7 • 47 min
Award winning activist and researcher Raj Patel has teamed up with innovative environmental historian and historical geographer Jason W. Moore to produce an accessible book which provides historical explanations for the world ecological crises and the…
Alys Eve Weinbaum, “The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery: Biocapitalism and Black Feminism’s Philosophy of History” (Duke UP, 2019)
Jan 7 • 56 min
In The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery: Biocapitalism and Black Feminism’s Philosophy of History (Duke University Press, 2019), University of Washington Professor of English Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in…
Matthew D. O’Hara, “The History of the Future in Colonial Mexico” (Yale UP, 2018)
Jan 6 • 35 min
Latin America – especially colonial Latin America – is not particularly known for futurism. For popular audiences, the region’s history likely evokes images of book burning, the Inquisition, and other symbols of orthodoxy and fatalism. Specialists too…
Christopher Lovins, “King Chŏngjo: An Enlightened Despot in Early Modern Korea” (SUNY Press, 2019)
Jan 6 • 71 min
Though traditionally regarded as a monarch who failed to arrest the gradual decline of his kingdom, the Korean king Chŏngjo has benefited in recent decades from a wave of new scholarship which has reassessed both his reign and his role in Korean history.…
Frederick Beiser, “Hermann Cohen: An Intellectual Biography” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jan 6 • 56 min
The eminent scholar of Neo-Kantianism, Frederick Beiser, has struck again, this time bringing his considerable analytical powers and erudition to the task of intellectual biography. For those of you aware of the distinguished philosophical career of…
Barbara Spackman, “Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands” (Liverpool UP, 2017)
Jan 6 • 48 min
Barbara Spackman’s riveting study identifies a strand of what it calls “Accidental Orientalism” in narratives by Italians who found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Relocated, or “de-toured” by historical…
Jorge Canizares-Esguerra, “Nature, Empire, And Nation: Explorations of the History of Science in the Iberian World” (Stanford UP, 2006)
Jan 3 • 37 min
In the late 1500s, the mines of Potosí –a mountain in southern Bolivia — produced 60% of the world’s silver. It was a place of great wealth and terrible suffering. It is also a place, Jorge Canizares-Esguerra argues, that challenges the very idea of the…
Susan Schulten, “A History of American in 100 Maps” (U Chicago Press 2018)
Jan 3 • 86 min
In her new book A History of American in 100 Maps (University of Chicago Press 2018), historian Susan Schulten uses maps to explore five centuries of American history, from the voyages of European discovery to the digital age. Schulten’s “visual tour of…
Keri Leigh Merritt, “Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Jan 3 • 32 min
Keri Leigh Merritt discusses her book, Masterless Men: Poor Whites and Slavery in the Antebellum South (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and intersections of race, class, politics, and slavery in the pre-Civil War South. Analyzing land policy, labor,…
C. J. Alvarez, “Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the US-Mexico Divide” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Jan 3 • 60 min
Recent debates over the building of a border wall on the U.S.-Mexico divide have raised logistical and ethical issues, leaving the historical record of border building uninvoked. A recent book, written by UT Austin professor Dr. C.J. Alvarez, offers an…
Christopher A. Molnar, “Memory, Politics, and Yugoslav Migrations to Postwar Germany” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Jan 3 • 70 min
During Europe’s 2015 refugee crisis, more than a hundred thousand asylum seekers from the western Balkans sought refuge in Germany. This was nothing new, however; immigrants from the Balkans have streamed into West Germany in massive numbers throughout…
Stephanie Malia Hom, “Empire’s Mobius Strip: Historical Echoes in Italy’s Crisis of Migration and Detention” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Dec 31, 2019 • 40 min
Italy’s current crisis of Mediterranean migration and detention has its roots in early twentieth century imperial ambitions. Stephanie Malia Hom’s new book Empire’s Mobius Strip: Historical Echoes in Italy’s Crisis of Migration and Detention (Cornell…
Andrew Israel Ross, “Public City/Public Sex: Homosexuality, Prostitution, and Urban Culture in Nineteenth-Century Paris” (Temple UP, 2019)
Dec 31, 2019 • 39 min
In his provocative new book, Public City/Public Sex: Homosexuality, Prostitution, and Urban Culture in Nineteenth-Century Paris (Temple University Press, 2019), Dr. Andrew Israel Ross maps out the intersection between histories of sexualities and the…
E. Wakild and M. K. Berry, “A Primer for Teaching Environmental History: Ten Design Principles” (Duke UP, 2018)
Dec 31, 2019 • 52 min
Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry have written a practical, informative, and inspiring guide to teaching environmental history. It also happens to be fun. A Primer for Teaching Environmental History: Ten Design Principles (Duke University Press, 2018)…
Gillian Glaes, “African Political Activism in Postcolonial France: State Surveillance and Social Welfare” (Routledge, 2018)
Dec 31, 2019 • 62 min
Gillian Glaes’s African Political Activism in Postcolonial France: State Surveillance and Social Welfare (Routledge, 2018) examines the experiences and agency of African immigrants in France from 1960 through the 1970s. Focused on the Africans who…
Benjamin Francis-Fallon, “The Rise of the Latino Vote: A History” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Dec 31, 2019 • 55 min
While media pundits continually speculate over the future leanings of the so-called “Latino vote,” Benjamin Francis-Fallon historicizes how Latinos were imagined into a national electoral constituency in his new book The Rise of the Latino Vote: A History…
Adele Lindenmeyr, “Citizen Countess: Sofia Panina and the Fate of Revolutionary Russia” (U Wisconsin Press, 2019)
Dec 31, 2019 • 45 min
Once one of the wealthiest members of the Russian aristocracy, Sofia Panina spent her final years living on a pension while in exile from her homeland. Adele Lindenmeyr’s book Citizen Countess: Sofia Panina and the Fate of Revolutionary Russia (University…
Joshua Specht, “Red Meat Republic: A Hoof-to-Table History of How Beef Changed America” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Dec 30, 2019 • 30 min
Why do Americans eat so much beef? In Red Meat Republic: A Hoof-to-Table History of How Beef Changed America (Princeton University Press, 2019), the historian Joshua Specht provides a history that shows how our diets and consumer choices remain rooted in…
Charlotte Brooks, “American Exodus: Second-Generation Chinese Americans in China, 1901–1949” (U California Press, 2019)
Dec 30, 2019 • 67 min
Between 1901 and World War II, up to half of all U.S.-born Chinese Americans relocated to China in search of better lives due to the discrimination they faced in the United States. Charlotte Brooks tells the story of these emigres in American Exodus:…
David Head, “A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution” (Pegasus Books, 2019)
Dec 30, 2019 • 56 min
In March 1783, George Washington confronted a meeting of disgruntled Continental Army officers at their encampment at Newburgh, New York. In his book A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution…
Seán Crosson, “Gaelic Games on Film” (Cork UP, 2019)
Dec 30, 2019 • 67 min
Today we are joined by Seán Crosson, leader of the Sport and Exercise Research Group at NUI Galway, co-director of the MA in Sports Journalism and Communication, and Professor at the Huston School of Film and Digital Media. He is also the author of Gaelic…
Angelina Callahan, “NASA in the World: Fifty Years of International Collaboration in Space” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013)
Dec 27, 2019 • 34 min
Angelina Callahan talks about the Naval Research Laboratory’s Vanguard Project. While the launch of Vanguard 1 in 1958 was part of the Cold War “Space Race,” it also represented something more: a scientific platform for understanding the space environment…
Alex Lichtenstein, “Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid” (Indiana UP, 2016)
Dec 27, 2019 • 38 min
Alex Lichtenstein, Associate Professor of History at Indiana University, discusses his new book with co-author Rick Halpern, Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid (Indiana University Press, 2016) photojournalism, and writing transnational…
The Treaty of Versailles One Hundred Years On
Dec 27, 2019 • 39 min
The Versailles Treaty of 1919, celebrates its one-hundred anniversary this year. And, yet unlike the more recent centenaries, such as that of the outbreak of the Great War or the Russian Revolution, the Versailles Treaty, notwithstanding its importance as…
Benjamin Breen, “The Age of Intoxication: Origins of the Global Drug Trade” (U Penn Press, 2019)
Dec 26, 2019 • 61 min
In Benjamin Breen’s The Age of Intoxication: Origins of the Global Drug Trade (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), we are transported back to a time when there was no such thing as “recreational” and “medicinal” drugs. People ate Egyptian mummies.…
David Pettinicchio, “Politics of Empowerment: Disability Rights and the Cycle of American Policy Reform” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Dec 26, 2019 • 25 min
David Pettinicchio has written Politics of Empowerment: Disability Rights and the Cycle of American Policy Reform (Stanford University Press, 2019). He is assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. In Politics of Empowerment, David…
Evan Friss, “On Bicycles: A 200-Year History of Cycling in New York City” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Dec 26, 2019 • 49 min
Evan Friss, an associate professor of history at James Madison University, historicizes the bicycle’s place in New York City’s social, economic, infrastructural and cultural politics. On Bicycles: A 200-Year History of Cycling in New York City (Columbia…
Reider Payne, “War and Diplomacy in the Napoleonic Era” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Dec 26, 2019 • 68 min
Though Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh remains well known today for his role in shaping the post-Napoleonic peace settlement in Europe, his half-brother Sir Charles Stewart has received far less attention despite his own prominent part in the…
Paul Robinson, “Russian Conservatism” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Dec 24, 2019 • 60 min
Professor Paul Robinson’s new book, Russian Conservatism (Cornell University Press, 2019) is a comprehensive examination of the roots and development of the hardy strain of conservative political thought in Russian history. Robinson begins by tackling the…
Brandon R. Byrd, “The Black Republic: African Americans and the Fate of Haiti” (U Penn Press, 2019)
Dec 24, 2019 • 58 min
Brandon R. Byrd is the author of The Black Republic: African Americans and the Fate of Haiti, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2019. The Black Republic examines the multitude of responses by African American leaders towards Haiti…
Seyed Ali Alavi, “Iran and Palestine: Past, Present, and Future” (Routledge, 2019)
Dec 24, 2019 • 24 min
In Iran and Palestine: Past, Present and Future (Routledge, 2019), Seyed Ali Alavi (SOAS University of London) surveys the history of the relationship between Iran – and especially the Islamic Republic of Iran - with Palestinian organisations and…
James M. Vaughn, “The Politics of Empire at the Accession of George III” (Yale UP, 2019)
Dec 23, 2019 • 42 min
In his notes for a speech to be delivered in the House of Commons in the wake of American Independence, the MP and imperial reformer Edmund Burke observed that ‘Some people are great Lovers of uniformity - They are not satisfied with a rebellion in the…
Jane D. Hatter, “Composing Community in Late Medieval Music: Self-Reference, Pedagogy, and Practice” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Dec 23, 2019 • 56 min
There are a handful of pieces from the Medieval and Renaissance periods that most music students learn about in their introductory history courses; among them are Guillaume Du Fay’s, Ave regina celorum III and Johannes Ockeghem’s Missa Prolationum. Some…
K. B. Berzock, “Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange across Medieval Saharan Africa” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Dec 23, 2019 • 72 min
The companion publication to the 2019-2020 traveling exhibition Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange across Medieval Saharan Africa (Princeton University Press, 2019, published in association with the Mary and Leigh Block Museum…
Beth Fischer, “The Myth of Triumphalism: Rethinking President Reagan’s Cold War Legacy” (UP of Kentucky, 2019)
Dec 23, 2019 • 43 min
Every time that I teach any portion of a course dealing with Ronald Reagan and the end of the Cold War, I gird myself for the inevitable myth-busting that I’m going to do. The idea that Reagan won the Cold War by bankrupting the Soviet Union through heavy…
Matthew Lockwood, “To Begin The World Over Again: How the American Revolution Devastated the Globe” (Yale UP, 2019)
Dec 20, 2019 • 66 min
Growing up as an American, you’re bound to be all-but-suffused with triumphalist histories of the American Revolution. Those histories might have a tough of the Hegelian to them, asserting that the Revolutionary War was part of the inevitable development…
April Eisman, “Bernhard Heisig and the Fight for Modern Art in East Germany” (Camden House, 2018)
Dec 20, 2019 • 57 min
In her book, Bernhard Heisig and the Fight for Modern Art in East Germany (Camden House, 2018), April Eisman examines one of East Germany’s most successful artists as a point of entry into the vibrant art world of the “other” Germany. In the 1980s,…
Talitha LeFlouria, “Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South” (UNC Press, 2016)
Dec 20, 2019 • 37 min
Professor Talitha LeFlouria, a fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia, discusses her book, Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) and the lives,…
David D. Hall, “The Puritans: A Transatlantic History” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Dec 19, 2019 • 76 min
This book is a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding critical new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice…
Darnella Davis, “Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era” (U New Mexico Press, 2018)
Dec 19, 2019 • 58 min
In Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era (U New Mexico Press, 2018), Darnella Davis combines the personal with the national in telling the story of allotment in Indian Territory/Oklahoma. Dr. Davis traces her…
Giuliana Chamedes, “A Twentieth-Century Crusade: The Vatican’s Battle to Remake Christian Europe” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Dec 18, 2019 • 70 min
Giuliana Chamedes’ new book A Twentieth-Century Crusade: The Vatican’s Battle to Remake Christian Europe (Harvard University Press, 2019) explores how World War I galvanized the central government of the Catholic Church to craft its own variety of…
Thomas Kühne, “The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Dec 17, 2019 • 68 min
In The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Professor Thomas Kühne writes an innovative account of how the concept of comradeship shaped the actions,…
Taomo Zhou, “Migration in the Time of Revolution: China, Indonesia and the Cold War” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Dec 17, 2019 • 66 min
If tales of China’s radical ‘opening up’ to the world over the last 30 years imply that the country was somehow ‘closed’ before this, then one need only think of Beijing’s dalliances with various potential socialist allies during the Cold War to dispel…
G. Edward White, “Law in American History, Volume III: 1930-2000” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Dec 17, 2019 • 63 min
For nearly two decades the renowned legal historian G. Edward White has been writing a multi-volume history of law in America. In his third and concluding volume, Law in American History, Volume III: 1930-2000 (Oxford UP, 2019), he surveys the many…
Julia Neuberger, “Antisemitism: What It Is, What It Isn’t, Why It Matters” (Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 2019)
Dec 16, 2019 • 49 min
Anti-Semitic incidents, ranging from vandalism through murder, are on the rise in Great Britain, and across Europe and North America. Julia Neuberger - Senior Rabbi at West London Synagogue, a member of the House of Lords, chair of the Van Leer Jerusalem…
Stephen F. Knott, “The Lost Soul of the American Presidency” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Dec 13, 2019 • 46 min
In this latest book, Stephen F. Knott continues his extensive research of the American presidency, from the Founders’ concept of the office to the current office holder. In The Lost Soul of the American Presidency: The Decline into Demagoguery and the…
Louis Hyman, “Temp: How American Work, American Business, and the American Dream became Temporary” (Viking, 2018)
Dec 13, 2019 • 74 min
It has become a truism that work has become less secure and more precarious for a widening swath of American workers. Why and how this has happened, and what workers can and should do about it, is the subject of a wide-ranging new book, Temp: How American…
Fran Altvater, “Sacramental Theology and the Decoration of Baptismal Fonts” (Cambridge Scholars, 2017)
Dec 13, 2019 • 33 min
Fran Altvater talks about the Medieval Pilgrimage, a practice that became central to Christian Europe in the early Middle Ages and evolved into the military pilgrimages of the Crusades in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries. Altvater is a professor of art…
Katherine Rye Jewell, “Dollars for Dixie: Business and the Transformation of Conservatism in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Dec 13, 2019 • 43 min
Katherine Rye Jewell, Assistant Professor of History at Fitchburg State University, discusses her book, Dollars for Dixie: Business and the Transformation of Conservatism in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and the evolution of…
Lennox Honychurch, “In the Forests of Freedom: The Fighting Maroons of Dominica” (UP Mississippi, 2017)
Dec 12, 2019 • 51 min
Maroons—enslaved Africans who escaped and formed autonomous communities—dominated Dominica’s hilly interior for centuries. Dominica’s unusual history of a relatively brief period of colonization and few sugar plantations shaped a history of Maroon life…
Céline Carayon, “Eloquence Embodied: Nonverbal Communication among French and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas” (UNC Press, 2019)
Dec 12, 2019 • 114 min
Taking a fresh look at the first two centuries of French colonialism in the Americas, Eloquence Embodied: Nonverbal Communication among French and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas (University of North Carolina Press and the Omohundro Institute, 2019),…
Jelena Subotić, “Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Dec 12, 2019 • 49 min
In her new book Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism (Cornell University Press, 2019) Jelena Subotić asks why Holocaust memory continues to be so deeply troubled―ignored, appropriated, and obfuscated―throughout Eastern Europe, even…
Gabe Logan, “The Early Years of Chicago Soccer, 1887-1939” (Lexington Books, 2019)
Dec 12, 2019 • 46 min
The thriving metropolis of Chicago was the land of opportunity for a wide variety of ethnic groups. As individuals from nations where soccer reigned began arriving in the area, they instituted teams and leagues that supported “their” game. Ultimately the…
Amy Aronson, “Chrystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Dec 11, 2019 • 61 min
Amy Aronson is an Associate Professor of Journalism and Media Studies at Fordham University and former editor at Working Woman and Ms. magazines. Her biography Chrystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life (Oxford University Press, 2019) gives us the life of a…
Joshua Simon, “The Ideology of the Creole Revolution” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Dec 11, 2019 • 68 min
Joshua Simon’s The Ideology of the Creole Revolution: Imperialism and Independence in American and Latin American Political Thought published by Cambridge University Press in 2017, compares the political thought of three Creole revolutionary leaders:…
Richard Whatmore, “Terrorists, Anarchists, and Republicans: The Genevans and the Irish in Time of Revolution” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Dec 11, 2019 • 77 min
In 1798, members of the United Irishmen were massacred by the British amid the crumbling walls of a half-built town near Waterford in Ireland. Many of the Irish were republicans inspired by the French Revolution, and the site of their demise was known as…
A. R. Ruis, “Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States” (Rutgers UP, 2017)
Dec 10, 2019 • 71 min
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with A.R. Ruis about the 2017 book Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States – published in 2017 by Rutgers University Press. Ruis narrates the development of school…
Winston Black, “The Middle Ages: Facts and Fictions” (ABC-CLIO, 2019)
Dec 10, 2019 • 69 min
Winston Black’s new book The Middle Ages: Facts and Fictions (ABC-CLIO, 2019) guides readers through 10 pervasive fictions about medieval history, provides them with the sources and analytical tools to critique those fictions, and identifies what really…
E. Jones-Imhotep and T. Adcock, “Made Modern: Science and Technology in Canadian History” (UBC Press, 2018)
Dec 10, 2019 • 61 min
Science and technology have shaped not only economic empires and industrial landscapes, but also the identities, anxieties, and understandings of people living in modern times. The book I’m looking at today, Made Modern: Science and Technology in Canadian…
Luis Martínez-Fernández, “Key to the New World: A History of Early Colonial Cuba” (U Florida Press, 2018)
Dec 10, 2019 • 71 min
From pre-contact, to first-contact, to colonization and beyond, Key to the New World: A History of Early Colonial Cuba (University of Florida Press, 2018) by Luis Martínez-Fernández is an easy-to-read, yet incredibly fascinating and informative book on…
Wilson Jeremiah Moses, “Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Dec 10, 2019 • 66 min
In Greek mythology Prometheus is the trickster Titan who gives fire to humanity. As Wilson Jeremiah Moses explains in his book Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus (Cambridge University Press, 2019) America’s third president demonstrated many of the same…
Afshin Matin-Asgari, “Both Eastern and Western: An Intellectual History of Iranian Modernity” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Dec 9, 2019 • 42 min
Following the Iranian Revolution of 1978—79, public and scholarly interest in Iran have skyrocketed, with a plethora of attempts seeking to understand and explain the events which led up to that moment. However, navigating the terrain of Iran’s modern…
Lyn Julius, “Uprooted: How 3000 Years of Jewish Civilization in the Arab World Vanished Overnight” (Vallentine Mitchell, 2018)
Dec 9, 2019 • 41 min
Who are the Jews from Arab countries? What were relations with Muslims like? What made Jews leave countries where they had been settled for thousands of years? And what lessons can we learn from the mass exodus of minorities from the Middle East? This…
Jason Smith, “To Master the Boundless Sea: The US Navy, the Marine Environment, and the Cartography of Empire” (UNC Press, 2018)
Dec 6, 2019 • 36 min
Jason Smith discusses the US Navy’s role in exploring and charting the ocean world. Smith is an assistant professor of history at Southern Connecticut State University. He’s the author of To Master the Boundless Sea: The US Navy, the Marine Environment,…
Roberto Carmack, “Kazakhstan in World War II: Mobilization and Ethnicity in the Soviet Empire” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Dec 6, 2019 • 57 min
Roberto Carmack’s Kazakhstan in World War II: Mobilization and Ethnicity in the Soviet Empire (University Press of Kansas, 2019) looks at the experience of the Kazakh Republic during the Soviet Union’s Great Patriotic War. Using a variety of archival…
Erin Schoneveld, “Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism: Art Magazines, Artistic Collectives, and the Early Avant-Garde” (Brill, 2018)
Dec 6, 2019 • 71 min
Befitting an art history book, Erin Schoneveld’s Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism: Art Magazines, Artistic Collectives, and the Early Avant-Garde (Brill, 2018) is a beautifully packaged analysis of the early twentieth-century Japanese modern art…
Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt, “Reconsidering Southern Labor History” (UP of Florida, 2018)
Dec 6, 2019 • 25 min
Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt discuss their new edited volume, Reconsidering Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power (University Press of Florida, 2018), the nexus of race, class and power in the history of labor in the South, and how a new…
Chet Van Duzer, “Martin Waldseemüller’s ‘Carta marina’ of 1516: Study and Transcription of the Long Legends” (Springer, 2019)
Dec 6, 2019 • 59 min
Chet Van Duzer’s new book Martin Waldseemüller’s ‘Carta marina’ of 1516: Study and Transcription of the Long Legends (Springer, 2019), presents the first detailed study of one of the most important masterpieces of Renaissance cartography. By transcribing,…
Eleanor Parker, “Dragon Lords: The History and Legends of Viking England” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Dec 5, 2019 • 22 min
For all of their prominence in the popular imagination today, the historical record of the Viking presence in England is limited, with much of what we know about them dependent upon the literary accounts attached to it. In Dragon Lords: The History and…
Sarah Handley-Cousins, “Bodies in Blue: Disability in the Civil War North” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Dec 5, 2019 • 48 min
All wars, in a practical sense, center on the destruction of the human body, and in Bodies in Blue: Disability in the Civil War North (University of Georgia Press, 2019), Sarah Handley-Cousins, a clinical assistant professor at the University at Buffalo,…
Lundy Braun, “Breathing Race into the Machine” (U Minnesota Press, 2014)
Dec 4, 2019 • 45 min
“We cannot get answers to questions that cannot be asked.” Lundy Braun’s influential book, Breathing Race into the Machine: The Surprising Career of the Spirometer from Plantation to Genetics (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) documents the history and…
Donna Guy, “Creating Charismatic Bonds in Argentina: Letters to Juan and Eva Perón” (U New Mexico Press, 2016)
Dec 4, 2019 • 56 min
Donna Guy’s 2016 book Creating Charismatic Bonds in Argentina: Letters to Juan and Eva Perón (University of New Mexico Press) is a history of Peronist populism that puts everyday people at the center of her exploration. Using letters written by Argentine…
Asher Price, “Earl Campbell: Yards After Contact” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Dec 4, 2019 • 44 min
Earl Campbell was a force in American football, winning a state championship in high school, rushing his way to a Heisman trophy for the University of Texas, and earning MVP as he took the Houston Oilers to the brink of the Super Bowl. Asher Price’s…
Lesley Chamberlain, “Ministry of Darkness: How Sergei Uvarov Created Conservative Modern Russia” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Dec 3, 2019 • 48 min
Count Sergey Semyonovich Uvarov, once proclaimed by Aleksandr Herzen as a ‘Prometheus of our day’, has in the past 160 years become something of an also-ran in Russian History. Notwithstanding his manifold contributions to the Russian education system as…
John L. Brooke, “‘There Is a North’: Fugitive Slaves, Political Crisis, and Cultural Transformation in the Coming of the Civil War” (U Mass Press, 2019)
Dec 3, 2019 • 67 min
How does political change take hold? In the 1850s, politicians and abolitionists despaired, complaining that the “North, the poor timid, mercenary, driveling North” offered no forceful opposition to the power of the slaveholding South. And yet, as John L.…
Sally Holloway, “The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Dec 3, 2019 • 40 min
What was the role of love and courtship in eighteenth-century English culture? In her new book, The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture (Oxford University Press, 2019), Sally Holloway uses innovative methods to…
Alberto Cairo, “How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information” (Norton, 2019)
Dec 3, 2019 • 57 min
We’ve all heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, but what if we don’t understand what we’re looking at? Social media has made charts, infographics, and diagrams ubiquitous―and easier to share than ever. We associate charts with science and…
Lior Sternfeld, “Between Iran and Zion: Jewish Histories of Twentieth-Century Iran” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Dec 3, 2019 • 48 min
Between Iran and Zion: Jewish Histories of Twentieth-Century Iran (Stanford University Press, 2019) by Lior Sternfeld presents the first systematic study of the rich and variegated history of Jews in twentieth-century Iran. Lior begins his intervention by…
Stephen Le, “100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today” (Picador, 2016)
Dec 3, 2019 • 65 min
There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat…
Emanuela Grama, “Socialist Heritage: The Politics of Past and Place in Romania” (Indiana UP, 2019)
Dec 2, 2019 • 57 min
Focusing on Romania from 1945 to 2016, Emanuela Grama’s new book Socialist Heritage: The Politics of Past and Place in Romania (Indiana University Press, 2019) explores the socialist state’s attempt to create its own heritage, as well as the legacy of…
Philipp Stelzel, “History after Hitler: A Transatlantic Enterprise” (U Penn Press, 2018)
Dec 2, 2019 • 60 min
The decades following the end of World War II witnessed the establishment of a large and diverse German-American scholarly community studying modern German history. As West Germany’s formerly deeply nationalist academic establishment began to reconcile…
Claudia Moscovici, “Holocaust Memories: A Survey of Holocaust Memoirs, Histories, Novels, and Films” (Hamilton, 2019)
Dec 2, 2019 • 30 min
Claudia Moscovici’s recent book, Holocaust Memories: A Survey of Holocaust Memoirs, Histories, Novels, and Films (Hamilton Books, 2019), is intended for educators and politicians to draw attention to and educate people about the Never Again Education Act.…
Kathryn Holliday, “The Open-Ended City: David Dillon on Texas Architecture” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Dec 2, 2019 • 39 min
It may only be a slight exaggeration to say that one of David Dillon’s career accomplishments was to put the words “Dallas” and “architecture” in the same sentence again. After a screed in 1980 entitled “Why Is Dallas Architecture So Bad?” launched his…
Kerry Driscoll, “Mark Twain among the Indians and Other Indigenous Peoples” (U California Press, 2018)
Dec 2, 2019 • 97 min
Mark Twain among the Indians and Other Indigenous Peoples (University of California Press, 2018; paperback edition, 2019) is the first book-length study of the writer’s evolving views regarding the aboriginal inhabitants of North America and the Southern…
Cindy Hahamovitch, “The Fruits of Their Labor: Atlantic Coast Farmworkers and the Making of Migrant Poverty, 1870-1945” (UNC Press, 2010)
Nov 29, 2019 • 42 min
Today Professor Cindy Hahamovitch of the University of Georgia discusses her research connecting the global histories of 19th-century indentured servants and today’s guestworkers. In 1933 Congress granted American laborers the right of collective…
Kathleen Sheppard, “The Life of Margaret Alice Murray: A Woman’s Work in Archaeology” (Lexington, 2017)
Nov 29, 2019 • 33 min
After Napoleon occupied Egypt, Europeans became obsessed with the ancient cultures of the Nile. In Britain, the center of Egyptology research was University College London (UCL). At the heart of the UCL program was the Egyptologist, Margaret Alice Murray.…
John P. Davis, “Russia in the Time of Cholera” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018)
Nov 29, 2019 • 57 min
The idea of “backwardness” often plagues historical writing on Russia. In Russia in the Time of Cholera: Disease under Romanovs and Soviets (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018), Dr. John P. Davis counteracts this “backwardness” paradigm, arguing that from the…
Christine D. Baker, “Medieval Islamic Sectarianism” (Amsterdam UP, 2019)
Nov 29, 2019 • 54 min
How do contemporary events shape the ways in which we read, understand, and interpret historical processes of identity formation? How can we resist framing conflicts of the past through frameworks of the present? What role does historical memory play in…
Stephen R. Taaffe, “Washington’s Revolutionary War Generals” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
Nov 27, 2019 • 44 min
When George Washington led the United States to victory in the American Revolution, he did so in collaboration with seventy-three other men who served as major and brigadier generals in the Continental Army over the course of the war. In Washington’s…
C. Browning, P. Hayes, R. Hilberg, “German Railroads, Jewish Souls” (Berghahn Books, 2019)
Nov 27, 2019 • 52 min
Raul Hilberg was a giant in the field of Genocide and Holocaust Studies. Frequently cited as the founder of the field in the United States, Hilberg wrote, taught, and mentored for decades. In a series of influential books, he scouted out the terrain,…
Andrew Roberts, “Leadership in War: Lessons From Those Who Made History” (Allen Lane, 2019)
Nov 27, 2019 • 33 min
Andrew Roberts is one of our most distinguished biographers and historians, and the author of the magisterial work, Churchill: Walking with Destiny (2018). Today we talk to Andrew about his most recent work, Leadership in War: Lessons From Those Who Made…
Sebastian Prange, “Monsoon Islam: Trade and Faith on the Medieval Malabar Coast” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Nov 27, 2019 • 56 min
Monsoon Islam: Trade and Faith on the Medieval Malabar Coast (Cambridge University Press, 2019) by Sebastian Prange provides a fascinating window into the Muslim world of the medieval (12-16th century) Malabar Coast and the development of Islam that was…
Caroline Weber, “Proust’s Duchess” (Knopf, 2019)
Nov 27, 2019 • 72 min
“My greatest adventure was undoubtedly Proust. What is there left to write after that?” This is what Virginia Woolf said, full of admiration — and envy, too. Delve into Marcel Proust in this conversation with Caroline Weber, author of Proust’s Duchess:…
Michael G. Vann, “The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empire, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Nov 26, 2019 • 57 min
A funny thing happened to historian Michael Vann* on the way to his PhD thesis. While he was doing his research on French colonialism and the urbanist project in Hanoi, he came across an intriguing dossier: “Destruction of animals in the city”. The…
Roland Elliot Brown, “Godless Utopia: Soviet Anti-Religious Propaganda” (FUEL, 2019)
Nov 26, 2019 • 46 min
In the arc of Soviet history, few government programs were as tenacious as the anti-religious campaign, which systematically set out to debunk organized religion as “the opium of the people.” This political storm of heaven lasted from the earliest days of…
Peter Kerasotis, “Alou: My Baseball Journey” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Nov 26, 2019 • 57 min
All aficionados of baseball are familiar with the pathbreaking role of Jackie Robinson in reintegrating the game back in 1947. What many fans are less familiar with are the issues that Latinos of color endured both in the minor leagues and the Majors…
What Should We Think of the British Empire?
Nov 26, 2019 • 49 min
The British Empire at its greatest extent covered approximately twenty-five percent of the surface of the globe with the same percentage of the world so population under its rule, directly or indirectly. And, yet a little over one-hundred years after its…
Simon Wolfgang Fuchs, “In a Pure Muslim Land: Shi’ism between Pakistan and the Middle East” (UNC Press, 2019)
Nov 26, 2019 • 49 min
Scholarly and public discourse on Islamic intellectual thought in the modern period tend to frame it narrowly through the concept of “influence” as it emanates from the Middle Eastern “center” to the non-Middle Eastern “peripheries” without paying…
Rebecca Scofield, “Outriders: Rodeo at the Fringes of the American West” (U Washington, 2019)
Nov 25, 2019 • 69 min
Rodeo is one of the indelible images of culture in the American West. The John Wayne-like cowboy tenaciously hanging on to the bucking bronc is a classic vision of what it means to be in the West. In Outriders: Rodeo at the Fringes of the American West…
Brianna Theobald, “Reproduction on the Reservation: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Colonialism in the Long Twentieth Century” (UNC Press, 2019)
Nov 25, 2019 • 44 min
In Reproduction on the Reservation: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Colonialism in the Long Twentieth Century (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), historian Brianna Theobald delivers a long-overdue, comprehensive history of Native women’s reproductive…
Jeremy Yellen, “The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere: When Total Empire Met Total War” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Nov 25, 2019 • 77 min
Jeremy Yellen’s The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere: When Total Empire Met Total War (Cornell University Press, 2019) is a challenging transnational exploration of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Japan’s ambitious, confused, and much…
James Gordon Finlayson, “The Habermas-Rawls Debate” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Nov 22, 2019 • 124 min
Jürgen Habermas and John Rawls are perhaps the two most renowned and influential figures in social and political philosophy of the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1990s, they had a famous exchange in the Journal of Philosophy. Quarreling over…
Pekka Hämäläinen, “Lakota America: A New History of Indigenous Power” (Yale UP, 2019)
Nov 22, 2019 • 38 min
The names of Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, and Crazy Horse are often readily recognized among many Americans. Yet the longer, dynamic history of the Lakota - a history from which these three famous figures were created - remains largely untold. In Lakota…
David Brandenberger, “Stalin’s Master Narrative” (Yale UP, 2019)
Nov 22, 2019 • 63 min
In this interview, David Brandenberger discusses his new edited volume (created in concert with RGASPI archivist and Russian historian Mikhail Zelenov) Stalin’s Master Narrative: A Critical Edition of ‘The History of the Communist Party of the Soviet…
Amy Offner, “Sorting Out the Mixed Economy: The Rise and Fall of Welfare and Developmental States in the Americas” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Nov 22, 2019 • 61 min
The neoliberal 1980s of austerity and privatization may appear as a break with the past—perhaps a model of government drawn up by libertarian economists. Not so, says Amy Offner in her spectacular new book, Sorting Out the Mixed Economy: The Rise and Fall…
Michelle Haberland, “Striking Beauties: Women Apparel Workers in the U.S. South, 1930-2000” (U Georgia Press, 2015)
Nov 22, 2019 • 46 min
Professor Michelle Haberland of Georgia Southern University, author of Striking Beauties: Women Apparel Workers in the U.S. South (University of Georgia Press, 2015), discusses the dynamics of gender, class, race and globalization in the southern apparel…
Lian Xi, “Blood Letters: The Untold Story of Lin Zhao, a Martyr in Mao’s China” (Basic Books, 2018)
Nov 21, 2019 • 78 min
In 1960, a poet and journalist named Lin Zhao was arrested by the Communist Party of China and sent to prison for re-education. Years before, she had –at approximately the same time– converted to both Christianity and to Maoism. In prison she lost the…
Roland De Wolk, “American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford” (U California Press, 2019)
Nov 21, 2019 • 71 min
With a name associated with the famous university in Palo Alto, Leland Stanford is among the best-known of the famous “robber barons” of the 19th century. Yet as Roland De Wolk explains in American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford…
Charles Halperin, “Ivan the Terrible: Free to Reward and Free to Punish” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
Nov 21, 2019 • 62 min
In Ivan the Terrible: Free to Reward and Free to Punish (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019, Dr. Charles Halperin provides a new analysis of Ivan’s reign, as well as valuable syntheses of previous scholarship on one of Russian’s most infamous rulers.…
Serhii Plokhy, “Forgotten Bastards of the Eastern Front” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Nov 20, 2019 • 58 min
What happened when Americans and Soviets fought alongside one another against Hitler? How did relations at Poltava airbase reveal cracks in the Grand Alliance? Serhii Plokhy tells the story of personal relationships and high geopolitics in his new book…
Mike Duncan, “The Storm Before the Storm: The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic” (PublicAffairs, 2017)
Nov 19, 2019 • 83 min
The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic…
Daniel Schwartz, “Ghetto: The History of a Word” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Nov 19, 2019 • 54 min
The word “ghetto” has taken on different meanings since its coinage in the 16th century. The uses of this term have varied considerably, from its original understanding as a compulsory Jewish quarter in Venice to its appropriation by black Americans to…
David Wheat, “Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640” (UNC Press, 2016)
Nov 18, 2019 • 61 min
David Wheat’s fantastic book Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) argues that the extensive participation of Luso-Africans, Latinized Africans, and free people of color made possible Spain’s…
Appeasement Eighty Years On
Nov 18, 2019 • 53 min
According to one dictionary definition, the term means: “to yield or concede to the belligerent demands of (a nation, group, person, etc.) in a conciliatory effort, sometimes at the expense of justice or other principles”. Of course when one employs this…
Michael Khodarkovsky, “Russia’s 20th Century: A Journey in 100 Histories” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Nov 18, 2019 • 71 min
Dissecting and digesting the history of the Soviet “experiment” can be a frustrating exercise for academics and a Sisphyan task for laymen; the endeavor demands scrutiny of the facts — and they are legion — but we must also grapple with the dystopian…
Pierre Asselin, “Vietnam’s American War: A History” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Nov 18, 2019 • 72 min
Do we need another book on the Vietnam War? Pierre Asselin, Dwight E. Stanford Chair in the History of US Foreign Relations at San Diego State University, thinks that we do. While he has already published A Bitter Peace: Washington, Hanoi, and the Making…
Wendy Gonaver, “The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840–1880” (UNC Press, 2019)
Nov 15, 2019 • 56 min
Dr. Wendy Gonaver discusses her book, The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840-1880 (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in Virginia, and the roles that race, the institution of slavery, and…
Helen Rozwadowski, “Vast Expanses: A History of the Oceans” (Reaktion Books, 2018)
Nov 15, 2019 • 32 min
Helen Rozwadowski talks about the history of the oceans and how these oceans have shaped human history in profound ways. Rozwadowski is a professor of history at the University of Connecticut, Avery Point. She is the author of many books including Vast…
What are Empires and Why do they Matter?
Nov 14, 2019 • 62 min
You hear a lot about “empires,” but what are they? Do they still exist? And why does it matter? Today I talked to Jeremy Black about empires, historical and present. Jeremy has thought deeply about empires, and written a lot about them. We discussed them…
Jonathan Rees, “Before the Refrigerator: How We Used to Get Ice” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Nov 14, 2019 • 54 min
Frederic Tudor was the “Ice King” of early nineteenth-century America. It was Tudor who realized that ice, harvested from New England ponds and rivers could be shipped to the Caribbean. Shipping was cheap, because ships often went empty to pick up cargo;…
J. Yates and C. N. Murphy, “Engineering Rules: Global Standard Setting since 1880” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Nov 14, 2019 • 52 min
Standards are crucial to the way we live—just look around you. A no. 2 pencil, perhaps? That arrived in an 8x8.5x20 shipping container? Standards allow your computer and smart phone to connect seamlessly with others. While it is clear that standards shape…
David Hayton, “Conservative Revolutionary: The Lives of Lewis Namier” (Manchester UP, 2019)
Nov 14, 2019 • 77 min
Acclaimed after the Second World War as England’s greatest historian, Sir Lewis Namier was an eastern European immigrant who came to idealise the English gentleman and enjoyed close friendship with leading figures of his day, including Winston Churchill.…
Charles B. Jones, “Chinese Pure Land Buddhism: Understanding a Tradition of Practice” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
Nov 14, 2019 • 74 min
Today’s guest is Charles B. Jones, Associate Professor and Director of the Religion and Culture graduate program in the School of Theology and Religious Studies at the Catholic University of America. He will be speaking with us about his new book Chinese…
Margaret E. Schotte, “Sailing School: Navigating Science and Skill, 1550-1800” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Nov 14, 2019 • 56 min
Throughout the Age of Exploration, European maritime communities bent on colonial and commercial expansion embraced the complex mechanics of celestial navigation. They developed schools, textbooks, and instruments to teach the new mathematical techniques…
Dave Tell, “Remembering Emmett Till” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Nov 14, 2019 • 55 min
On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they)—Asst. Prof. of Rhetoric and Communication at the State University of New York at Geneseo—interviews Dr. Dave Tell (he/him/his)—Professor of Communication at The University of Kansas—on…
Claire Edington, “Beyond the Asylum: Mental Illness in French Colonial Vietnam” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Nov 13, 2019 • 72 min
Both colonies and insane asylums are well known institutions of power. But what of asylums in Europe’s early 20th-century colonial empires? How did they operate? Who was confined in them? Who worked there? What was daily life like in such an institution?…
Wendy Wickwire, “At The Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging” (UBC Press, 2019)
Nov 13, 2019 • 63 min
The history of anthropology remembers James Teit as a field assistant and man-on-the spot for Franz Boas. But in At The Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging (University of British Columbia Press, 2019). Wendy Wickwire turns this picture…
William P. Hustwit, “Integration Now: Alexander v. Holmes and the End of Jim Crow Education” (UNC Press, 2019)
Nov 12, 2019 • 45 min
In this episode of Talking Legal History, Siobhan talks with William P. Hustwit about his book Integration Now: Alexander v. Holmes and the End of Jim Crow Education (UNC Press, 2019). Hustwit is the Associate Professor of History and Chair of the History…
Douglas R. Egerton, “Heirs of an Honored Name: The Decline of the Adams Family and the Rise of Modern America” (Basic Books, 2019)
Nov 12, 2019 • 102 min
John and Abigail Adams founded a famous political family, but they would not witness its calamitous fall from grace. When John Quincy Adams died in 1848, so began the slow decline of the family’s political legacy. In Heirs of an Honored Name: The Decline…
Robert Mann, “Becoming Ronald Reagan: The Rise of a Conservative Icon” (Potomac Book, 2019)
Nov 12, 2019 • 52 min
Throughout much of his career as an actor in Hollywood, Ronald Reagan identified as a passionate New Deal Democrat, yet by the time he turned to a career in politics in the 1960s he was a conservative Republican. In Becoming Ronald Reagan: The Rise of a…
S. Deborah Kang, “The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Nov 11, 2019 • 49 min
Today I talked to S. Deborah Kang about her book The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954, published by Oxford University Press in 2017. The INS on the Line explores the history behind Immigration and Naturalization…
John Launer, “Sex Versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein” (Henry N. Abrams, 2017)
Nov 11, 2019 • 59 min
John Launer’s Sex Versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein (Henry N. Abrams, 2017) manages to supplant (and given the power of the visual image, this is no mean feat) the picture you may have in your mind of Keira Knightley and Michael…
Han F. Vermeulen, “Before Boas: The Genesis of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment” (U Nebraska Press, 2015)
Nov 11, 2019 • 103 min
The history of anthropology has been written from multiple viewpoints, often from perspectives of gender, nationality, theory, or politics. Winner of the 2017 International Convention of Asia Scholars Book Prize, Before Boas: The Genesis of Ethnography…
Noelle Giuffrida, “Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee and Chinese Art Collecting in Postwar America” (U California Press, 2018)
Nov 9, 2019 • 84 min
Noelle Giuffrida’s book, Separating Sheep from Goats: Sherman E. Lee and Chinese Art Collecting in Postwar America (University of California Press, 2018), tells the history of collecting and exhibiting Chinese art through the story of renowned curator and…
Paula McQuade, “Catechisms and Women’s Writing in Seventeenth-Century England” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Nov 8, 2019 • 35 min
Paula McQuade, professor of English literature at DePaul University, is the author of a brilliant new account of Catechisms and Women’s Writing in Seventeenth-Century England (Cambridge University Press, 2017). This book opens up an entirely new field for…
Kenneth Fones-Wolf, “Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie” (U Illinois Press, 2015)
Nov 8, 2019 • 33 min
Professor Kenneth Fones-Wolf of West Virginia University discusses his book, co-authored with Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie (University of Illinois Press, 2015), the…
Iain MacGregor, “Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and the Most Dangerous Place On Earth” (Scribner, 2019)
Nov 8, 2019 • 71 min
There is perhaps no more iconic symbol of the Cold War than the Berlin Wall, the 96-mile-long barrier erected around West Berlin in 1961 to stem the flow of refugees from Eastern Europe. In Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and the Most…
Karen Routledge, “Do You See Ice?: Inuit and Americans at Home and Away” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Nov 8, 2019 • 32 min
In the 1800s, explorers and whalers returning home from the Arctic described a cold, desolate world, one that could swallow up expeditions without leaving a trace. But this did not describe the Arctic of the Inuit, who called this world their home. Karen…
Derrick E. White, “Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football” (UNC, 2019)
Nov 8, 2019 • 69 min
Dr. Derrick E. White’s new book Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football (University of North Carolina Press, 2019) chronicles the development of black college football in the twentieth century, and is…
AfroAm Studies Roundtable: Ashley Farmer on “Archiving While Black”
Nov 8, 2019 • 34 min
For histories to be written, historians must engage archival material. What happens, though, when particular groups of historians do not feel like they have full access to archival material(s), simply because of their race? Before the 1960s and 1970s,…
John Shelton Reed, “Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s” (LSU Press, 2012)
Nov 7, 2019 • 50 min
John Shelton Reed, William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of sociology (emeritus) at the University of North Carolina, has been observing the South for decades. This week he and Al Zambone talk about New Orleans in the 1920s, the subject of his book Dixie…
Sara Lorenzini, “Global Development: A Cold War History” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Nov 7, 2019 • 51 min
As Dr. Sara Lorenzini points out in her new book Global Development: A Cold War History (Princeton UP, 2019), the idea of economic development was a relatively novel one even as late as the 1940s. Much of the language of development was still being…
Trevor Thompson, “Playing for Australia: The First Socceroos, Asia, and World Football” (Fair Play, 2018)
Nov 7, 2019 • 59 min
Today we are joined by Trevor Thompson, a journalist who has reported on association football in Australia and around the world since the 1980s. He is also the author of Playing for Australia: The First Socceroos, Asia, and World Football (Fair Play…
Carlton F. W. Larson, “The Trials of Allegiance: Treason, Juries, and the American Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Nov 6, 2019 • 41 min
Carlton F. W. Larson is the author of The Trials of Allegiance: Treason, Juries, and the American Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2019). The Trials of Allegiance looks at the law of treason during the American Revolution, showing just how central…
Susan Neiman, “Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil” (FSG, 2019)
Nov 6, 2019 • 85 min
When Tennessee’s Governor recently ordered a holiday to celebrate the memory of confederate general Nathan Bedford Forest, a convicted war criminal who helped found the Ku Klax Klan, the New York Times columnist Paul Krugman commented: “The world would be…
Najam Haider, “The Rebel and the Imam in Early Islam” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Nov 6, 2019 • 46 min
In the absence of any real certainty about the nature and intention of the early sources that tell us the story of the early Islamic period, how can we use them? What sort of methodological approaches may we deploy to elucidate the meanings of texts,…
Lewis H. Siegelbaum, “Stuck on Communism: Memoir of a Russian Historian” (Northern Illinois UP, 2019)
Nov 6, 2019 • 61 min
This memoir by one of the foremost scholars of the Soviet period spans three continents and more than half a century―from the 1950s when Lewis Siegelbaum’s father was a victim of McCarthyism up through the implosion of the Soviet Union and beyond.…
Donald Ostrowski, “Europe, Byzantium, and the ‘Intellectual Silence’ of Rus’ Culture” (Arc Humanities Press, 2018)
Nov 6, 2019 • 79 min
In Europe, Byzantium, and the “Intellectual Silence” of Rus’ Culture (Arc Humanities Press, 2018), Dr. Donald Ostrowski pens a fresh look at an old question: Why did intellectual path of Medieval Russian culture differ so much from its counterparts in…
Stuart Schrader, “​Badges Without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing​” (U California Press, 2019)
Nov 5, 2019 • 74 min
Following World War II, in the midst of global decolonization and intensifying freedom struggles within its borders, the United States developed a worldwide police assistance program that aimed to crush left radicalism and extend its racial imperium.…
Emily Wilson, trans., “The Odyssey” (Norton, 2017)
Nov 5, 2019 • 68 min
The first great adventure story in the Western canon, The Odyssey is a poem about violence and the aftermath of war; about wealth, poverty, and power; about marriage and family; about travelers, hospitality, and the yearning for home. In this fresh,…
Erica Armstrong Dunbar, “She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman” (37 Ink, 2019)
Nov 5, 2019 • 38 min
Harriet Tubman is best known as one of the most famous conductors on the Underground Railroad. As a leading abolitionist, her bravery and selflessness has inspired generations in the continuing struggle for civil rights. Now, National Book Award nominee…
Alexander L. Hinton, “Man or Monster?: The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer” (Duke UP, 2016)
Nov 4, 2019 • 77 min
Can justice heal? Must there be justice in order to heal? Is there such a thing as justice, something to be striven for regardless of context? Alexander L. Hinton thinks through these questions in a pair of new books. The two are companion pieces, each…
Aurélie Basha i Novosejt, “I Made Mistakes: Robert McNamara’s Vietnam War Policy, 1960-1968 (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Nov 4, 2019 • 55 min
Speaking to an advisor in 1966 about America’s escalation of forces in Vietnam, American Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara confessed: ‘We’ve made mistakes in Vietnam … I’ve made mistakes. But the mistakes I made are not the ones they say I made’. In…
Cara New Daggett, “Birth of Energy: Fossil Fuels, Thermodynamics, and the Politics of Work” (Duke UP, 2019)
Nov 4, 2019 • 43 min
In Birth of Energy: Fossil Fuels, Thermodynamics, and the Politics of Work (Duke UP, 2019), Cara New Daggett suggests that reassessing our relationships with fossil fuels in the face of climate change also requires that we rethink the concept of energy…
Kathryn Conrad on University Press Publishing
Nov 3, 2019 • 40 min
As you may know, university presses publish a lot of good books. In fact, they publish thousands of them every year. They are different from most trade books in that most of them are what you might called “fundamental research.” Their authors—dedicated…
Wang Gungwu, “Home is Not Here” (NUS Press, 2018)
Nov 1, 2019 • 38 min
Wang Gungwu has long been recognized as a world authority on the history of China and the overseas Chinese. His work has been inspired by his own experience growing up Chinese in Southeast Asia, but with strong family, educational, and indeed emotional…
Bruce Riedel, “Beirut 1958: How America’s Wars in the Middle East Began” (Brookings, 2019)
Nov 1, 2019 • 36 min
In July 1958, U.S. Marines stormed the beach in Beirut, Lebanon, ready for combat. Farcically. they were greeted by vendors and sunbathers. Fortunately, the rest of their mission—helping to end Lebanon’s first civil war—went nearly as smoothly and…
Eileen Boris, “Making the Woman Worker: Precarious Labor and the Fight for Global Standards, 1919-2019” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Nov 1, 2019 • 44 min
Founded in 1919 along with the League of Nations, the International Labour Organization (ILO) establishes labor standards and produces knowledge about the world of work, serving as a forum for nations, unions, and employer associations. Before WWII, it…
Julia Nicholls, “Revolutionary Thought after the Paris Commune, 1871-1885” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Nov 1, 2019 • 59 min
Revolutionary Thought after the Paris Commune, 1871-1885 (Cambridge University Press, 2019), is the first comprehensive account of French revolutionary thought in the years between the crushing of France’s last nineteenth-century revolution and the…
Joseph F. O’Callaghan, “Alfonso X, the Justinian of His Age” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Nov 1, 2019 • 58 min
While monarchs throughout history used their power to make laws as a tool for governing their realms, rarely did they undertake the long and detailed work of drawing up an entire legal code. One of the few who did so was the Castilian king Alfonso X, and…
Russell Potter, “Finding Franklin: The Untold Story of a 165-year Search” (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2016)
Nov 1, 2019 • 44 min
In 1845, two British naval ships left England with 129 men in search of the Northwest Passage. They were never heard from again. The disappearance of the Franklin Expedition shocked the world. Dozens of expeditions set sail into the Arctic looking for the…
Jay Driskell, “Schooling Jim Crow: The Fight for Atlanta’s Booker T. Washington High School” (UVA Press, 2014)
Nov 1, 2019 • 46 min
Professor Jay Driskell of Hood College, author of Schooling Jim Crow: The Fight for Atlanta’s Booker T. Washington High School and the Roots of Black Protest Politics (University of Virginia Press, 2014), traces the roots of black protest politics to…
Oleg Benesch and Ran Zwigenberg, “Japan’s Castles: Citadels of Modernity in War and Peace” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 31, 2019 • 101 min
Oleg Benesch and Ran Zwigenberg’s coauthored Japan’s Castles: Citadels of Modernity in War and Peace (Cambridge University Press, 2019) uses the fate of castles after the Meiji coup of 1868 as a case study to explore aspects of Japan’s modern history…
David Biggs, “Footprints of War: Militarized Landscapes in Vietnam” (U Washington Press, 2018)
Oct 31, 2019 • 72 min
By now we all know that Vietnam is a country, not a war. But how have decades, and even centuries, of war impacted the land of this southeast Asian nation? Professor David Biggs of the University of California, Riverside, specializes in Vietnamese…
Perla Guerrero, “Nuevo South: Asians, Latinas/os, and the Remaking of Place” (U Texas Press, 2017)
Oct 31, 2019 • 54 min
Perla Guerrero is the author of Nuevo South: Asians, Latinas/os, and the Remaking of Place (University of Texas Press, 2017). Nuevo South explores the history of an ever diversifying U.S. South by examining the mixed reactions refugees, immigrants, and…
Timothy Lehman, “Up the Trail: How Texas Cowboys Herded Longhorns and Became an American Icon” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Oct 31, 2019 • 63 min
In 1866, a sixteen year old cowboy—the name was literal in his case—named J.M. Daugherty bought 1,000 cattle, hired five cowboys, and headed north for Missouri. In Indian Territory, he took the long way around Cherokee land, to avoid paying them for…
Kathleen M. McIntyre, “Protestantism and State Formation in Postrevolutionary Oaxaca” (U New Mexico Press, 2019)
Oct 30, 2019 • 55 min
Dr. Kathleen M. McIntyre’s Protestantism and State Formation in Postrevolutionary Oaxaca (University of New Mexico Press, 2019) explores the impact of Protestantism on Catholic indigenous communities in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca in the period…
W. Caleb McDaniel, “Sweet Taste of Liberty: A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Oct 30, 2019 • 44 min
Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood’s employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout the…
Jamie L. Pietruska, “Looking Forward: Prediction and Uncertainty in Modern America” (U Chicago Press, 2017)
Oct 30, 2019 • 38 min
A fortune teller, cotton prophet, and a weather forecaster walk into a bar—probably a more common occurrence than you might think in the Gilded Age United States! Jamie Pietruska’s Looking Forward: Prediction and Uncertainty in Modern America (University…
Nicholas Buccola, “The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Oct 30, 2019 • 64 min
Nicholas Buccola’s new book, The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America (Princeton University Press, 2019), uses the iconic debate between Baldwin and Buckley which took place at the Cambridge Union in…
Jeremy Black, “Maps of War: Mapping Conflict through the Centuries” (Conway, 2016)
Oct 29, 2019 • 63 min
There is little documented mapping of conflict prior to the Renaissance period, but, from the 17th century onward, military commanders and strategists began to document the wars in which they were involved and, later, to use mapping to actually plan the…
Dan Jones, “Crusaders: The Epic History of the Wars for the Holy Lands” (Viking, 2019)
Oct 29, 2019 • 40 min
Much has been written about the Crusades, the religiously-inspired wars that pockmarked the later centuries of the Middle Ages. Yet for all of the many books on the subject there has been surprisingly little focus on the men and the women who were…
Elisabeth Köll, “Railroads and the Transformation of China” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Oct 28, 2019 • 68 min
Railroads and the Transformation of China (Harvard University Press, 2019) looks at the development of railroads in China from the late 19th century to the post-Mao reform period. Treating railroads as institutions, Elisabeth Köll charts how railroads and…
Christina Jiménez, “Making an Urban Public: Popular Claims to the City in Mexico, 1879-1932” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
Oct 28, 2019 • 50 min
Making an Urban Public: Popular Claims to the City in Mexico, 1879-1932 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019) by Christina Jiménez is a social history of the city of Morelia, located in Western Mexico in the state of Michoacán. Set in an era of political…
David J. Silverman, “This Land Is Their Land” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Oct 28, 2019 • 46 min
What really happened at “the first Thanksgiving”? In This Land is Their Land: The Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the Troubled History of Thanksgiving (Bloomsbury, 2019), historian David J. Silverman reveals the complex history surrounding the…
Andrea Pitzer, “One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps” (Little, Brown and Company, 2017)
Oct 25, 2019 • 38 min
Andrea Pitzer talks about her book One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps (Little, Brown and Company, 2017), one of Smithsonian Magazine’s Ten Best History Books for 2017. While concentration camps may not seem to have much to do with…
Andreas Bernard, “Theory of the Hashtag” (Polity, 2019)
Oct 25, 2019 • 41 min
In his short book, Theory of the Hashtag (Polity, 2019), Andreas Bernard traces the origins and career of the hashtag. Following the history of the # sign through its origins in the Middle Ages and how it became a common symbol through its placement on…
Marc Dollinger, “Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s” (Brandeis UP, 2018)
Oct 25, 2019 • 29 min
In Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s (Brandeis University Press, 2018), Professor Marc Dollinger who holds the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in Jewish Studies and Social Responsibility at San Francisco State University,…
Jared Hardesty, “Black Lives, Native Lands, White Worlds: A History of Slavery in New England” (Bright Leaf, 2019)
Oct 25, 2019 • 72 min
Shortly after the first Europeans arrived in seventeenth-century New England, they began to import Africans and capture the area’s indigenous peoples as slaves. By the eve of the American Revolution, enslaved people comprised only about 4 percent of the…
Greta de Jong, “You Can’t Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice after the Civil Rights Movement” (UNC Press, 2016)
Oct 25, 2019 • 34 min
Professor Greta de Jong of the University of Nevada, Reno, discusses her book, You Can’t Eat Freedom: Southerners and Social Justice after the Civil Rights Movement (University of North Carolina Press, 2016), rural organizing, social justice movements,…
Amy Carney, “Marriage and Fatherhood in the Nazi SS” (Toronto UP, 2018)
Oct 25, 2019 • 41 min
From 1931 to 1945, leaders of the SS sought to transform their organization into a racially-elite family community that would serve as the Third Reich’s new aristocracy. They utilized the science of eugenics to convince SS men to marry suitable wives and…
Ann Elias, “Coral Empire: Underwater Oceans, Colonial Tropics, Visual Modernity” (Duke UP, 2019)
Oct 24, 2019 • 45 min
With the threats of sea water warming and ocean acidification, coral reefs have become both a fire alarm and a barometer for the dangers of human induced climate change. We now face the possibility of a world without coral. In this cogent and timely work,…
Michael Mandelbaum, “The Rise and Fall of Peace on Earth” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Oct 24, 2019 • 55 min
In the twenty-five years after 1989, the world enjoyed the deepest peace in history. In The Rise and Fall of Peace on Earth (Oxford Univiersity Press, 2019), the eminent foreign policy scholar Michael Mandelbaum examines that remarkable quarter century,…
Rachel Laudan, “Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History” (U California Press, 2015)
Oct 24, 2019 • 44 min
With Al Zambone this week is Rachel Laudan, author of the fascinating Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History (University of California Press, 2015). Once a historian of science and technology, living and teaching in Hawaii made her a historian of…
J. Neuhaus, “Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers” (West Virginia UP, 2019)
Oct 24, 2019 • 32 min
The things that make people academics — as deep fascination with some arcane subject, often bordering on obsession, and a comfort with the solitude that developing expertise requires — do not necessarily make us good teachers. Jessamyn Neuhaus’s Geeky…
Jessica Hinchy, “Governing Gender and Sexuality in Colonial India: The Hijra, c.1850-1900” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 24, 2019 • 63 min
Until Jessica Hinchy’s latest book, Governing Gender and Sexuality in Colonial India: The Hijra, c.1850-1900 (Cambridge University Press, 2019), there was no single monograph dedicated to the history of the Hijra community. Perhaps this silence can bear…
Andrew Hobbs, “A Fleet Street In Every Town: The Provincial Press in England, 1855-1900” (Open Book, 2018)
Oct 24, 2019 • 46 min
The dominance of the London press in the British national media has long overshadowed the presence of local newspapers in Great Britain and the roles they played in their communities. As Andrew Hobbs demonstrates in his book A Fleet Street In Every Town:…
Brenna Wynn Greer, “Represented: The Black Imagemakers Who Reimagined American Citizenship” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
Oct 23, 2019 • 67 min
Brenna Wynn Greer’s new study Represented: The Black Imagemakers Who Reimagined American Citizenship (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), provides a fascinating look at a trio of black imagemakers – publisher John H. Johnson, PR executive Moss…
Julia Young, “Mexican Exodus: Emigrants, Exiles, and Refugees of the Cristero War” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Oct 23, 2019 • 52 min
In Mexican Exodus: Emigrants, Exiles, and Refugees of the Cristero War (Oxford UP, 2019), Julia G. Young reframes the Cristero war as a transnational conflict, using previously unexamined archival materials from both Mexico and the United States to…
Saul Cornell, “The Partisan Republic: Democracy, Exclusion, and the Fall of the Founders’ Constitution, 1780s-1830s” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 23, 2019 • 52 min
The Partisan Republic: Democracy, Exclusion, and the Fall of the Founders’ Constitution, 1780s-1830s (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is the first book to unite a top down and bottom up account of constitutional change in the Founding era. Gerald…
Binyamin Appelbaum, “The Economists’ Hour: False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society” (Little Brown, 2019)
Oct 22, 2019 • 40 min
Think economics is the “dismal science” with abstract formulas that have no impact on life as it is actually lived? Think again. In The Economists’ Hour: False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society (Little Brown, 2019), Binyamin…
Lorena Oropeza, “The King of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina, Lost Prophet of the Chicano Movement” (UNC Press, 2019)
Oct 22, 2019 • 69 min
Lorena Oropeza, Professor of History at the University of California at Davis, sheds new light on one of Chicano history’s most notorious figures in her new book, The King of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina, Lost Prophet of the Chicano Movement(University of…
Ricky W. Law, “Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German Japanese Relations, 1919-1936” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 22, 2019 • 75 min
In his new book, Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German Japanese Relations, 1919-1936 (Cambridge University Press, 2019), associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University Ricky W. Law examines the cultural context of Tokyo and…
Henning Melber, “Dag Hammarskjöld, the United Nations, and the Decolonisation of Africa” (Hurst, 2019)
Oct 21, 2019 • 74 min
Dag Hammarskjold was such a dynamic secretary-general that for years, the motto about him was simply “Leave it to Dag.” Only the second person to hold that post when he was elected, Hammarskjold did a great deal to shape perceptions of the UN.…
Andrew C. Baker, “Bulldozer Revolutions: A Rural History of the Metropolitan South” (U Georgia Press, 2018)
Oct 18, 2019 • 56 min
The history of metropolitan expansion and suburbanization is often written from the perspective of the city. In Bulldozer Revolutions: A Rural History of the Metropolitan South (University of Georgia Press, 2018), by contrast, Andrew C. Baker focuses his…
Karen Cox, “Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South” (UNC Press, 2017)
Oct 18, 2019 • 35 min
Karen Cox, Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, discusses her new book, Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), and what one murder case in 1930s…
Catherine Clark, “Paris and the Cliché of History: The City in Photographs, 1860-1970” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Oct 18, 2019 • 62 min
What’s the first image that comes to mind when you hear the words “Paris” and “photography”? Is it a famous photo, perhaps an Atget, Brassai, or Doisneau? In her new book, Paris and the Cliché of History: The City in Photographs, 1860-1970 (Oxford UP,…
Nianshen Song, “Making Borders in Modern East Asia: The Tumen River Demarcation, 1881-1919” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Oct 17, 2019 • 63 min
Land borders in East Asia have played just as big a role in the region’s social transformations as their more recently debated maritime counterparts, and the boundary between China and Korea offers particularly telling insight into how society, identity…
Jolyon Baraka Thomas, “Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Oct 17, 2019 • 84 min
Jolyon Baraka Thomas’s Faking Liberties: Religious Freedom in American-Occupied Japan (University of Chicago Press, 2019) challenges the commonsensical notion that the Japanese empire granted its subjects no religious freedom—that, despite the legal…
David Lindsay Roberts, “Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans through History” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Oct 17, 2019 • 73 min
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George’s…
Matthew A. Sutton, “Double Crossed: The Missionaries Who Spied for the United States During the Second World War” (Basic Books, 2019)
Oct 17, 2019 • 28 min
What makes a good missionary makes a good spy. Or so thought “Wild” Bill Donovan when he secretly recruited a team of religious activists for the Office of Strategic Services. They entered into a world of lies, deception, and murder, confident that their…
Jon K. Lauck, “The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History” (U Iowa Press, 2013)
Oct 17, 2019 • 45 min
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest…
David Farber, “Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 16, 2019 • 23 min
A shattering account of the crack cocaine years from award-winning American historian David Farber, Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed (Cambridge University Press, 2019) tells the story of the young men who bet their lives on…
Richard Bell, “Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home” (Simon and Schuster, 2019)
Oct 16, 2019 • 48 min
Richard Bell is the author of Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home, published by Simon & Schuster in 2019. Stolen tells the true story of how five young Black boys were kidnapped from Philadelphia in 1825. Dr.…
Elena Albarrán, “Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism” (U Nebraska Press, 2014)
Oct 16, 2019 • 50 min
Elena Jackson Albarrán’s book Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) explores the changing politics of childhood during the period 1920-1940, in the wake of the Mexican Revolution.…
Lara Saguisag, “Incorrigibles and Innocents: Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics” (Rutgers UP, 2018)
Oct 16, 2019 • 106 min
Histories and criticism of comics note that comic strips published in the Progressive Era were dynamic spaces in which anxieties about race, ethnicity, class, and gender were expressed, perpetuated, and alleviated. The proliferation of comic strip…
David D. Vail, “Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945” (U Alabama Press, 2019)
Oct 15, 2019 • 38 min
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North…
Eric D. Weitz, “A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Oct 15, 2019 • 48 min
Who has the right to have rights? Motivated by Hannah Arendt’s famous reflections on the question of statelessness the book tells a non-linear global story of the emergence and transformations of human rights in the age of nation-states. In his new book A…
T. L. Bunyasi and C. W. Smith, “Stay Woke: A People’s Guide to Making All Black Lives Matter” (NYU Press, 2019)
Oct 14, 2019 • 61 min
Tehama Lopez Bunyasi and Candis Watts Smith have written an accessible and important book about the #BlackLivesMatter social movement and broader considerations of, essentially, how we got to where we are, in the United States, in regard to race and…
Jeremy Black, “A Brief History of Spain” (Robinson, 2019)
Oct 14, 2019 • 52 min
Wonderfully concise and very readable, A Brief History of Spain (Robinson, 2019), is perfect for travelers as well as the discerning reader. Professor of History at Exeter University Jeremy Black’s book is a ‘must read’. This is an extraordinary tale of…
Thomas Hager, “Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine” (Abrams Press, 2019)
Oct 14, 2019 • 62 min
Behind every landmark drug is a story. It could be a researcher’s genius insight, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, a new breakthrough technology, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. In his new book, Ten…
Lucas Richert, “Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs” (McGill-Queens UP, 2018)
Oct 11, 2019 • 51 min
Strange Trips isn’t only the title of Dr. Lucas Richert’s new book; it’s also a good description of the journey substances take from the black market to the doctor’s black bag—and, sometimes, back to the black market again. In Strange Trips: Science,…
Michitake Aso, “Rubber and the Making of Vietnam: An Ecological History, 1897-1975” (UNC Press, 2018)
Oct 11, 2019 • 83 min
How can the history of rubber be used as a way to understand the history of 20th-century Vietnam? In this episode of New Books in History, Michael G. Vann talks about Rubber and the Making of Vietnam: An Ecological History, 1897-1975 (University of North…
Maria Nugent, “Captain Cook Was Here” (Cambridge UP, 2009)
Oct 11, 2019 • 36 min
Maria Nugent talks about Aboriginal Australians first encounter with Captain Cook at Botany Bay, a violent meeting has come to represent the origin story of Australia’s colonization by Europeans. The encounter itself has been symbolized by a bark shield –…
Rafia Zafar, “Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Oct 11, 2019 • 63 min
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Rafia Zafar about her 2019 book Recipes for Respect: African American Meals and Meaning, from the University of Georgia Press. It’s part of the Southern Foodways Alliance Studies in Culture, People and…
Jennifer L. Derr, “The Lived Nile: Environment, Disease, and Material Colonial Economy in Egypt” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Oct 10, 2019 • 53 min
In October 1902, the reservoir of the first Aswan Dam filled, and Egypt’s relationship with the Nile River forever changed. Flooding villages of historical northern Nubia and filling the irrigation canals that flowed from the river, the perennial Nile not…
Nicole C. Kirk, “Wanamaker’s Temple: The Business of Religion in an Iconic Department Store” (NYU Press, 2018)
Oct 10, 2019 • 85 min
“On Christmas Eve, 1911, John Wanamaker stood in the middle of his elaborately decorated department store building in Philadelphia as shoppers milled around him picking up last minute Christmas presents. On that night, as for years to come, the store was…
Ussama Makdisi, “Age of Coexistence: The Ecumenical Frame and the Making of the Modern Arab World” (U California Press, 2019)
Oct 9, 2019 • 51 min
Building on nearly two decades of scholarship about sectarianism and communal relations in the Modern Middle East, Ussama Makdisi’s latest book, Age of Coexistence: The Ecumenical Frame and the Making of the Modern Arab World(University of California…
Gregory P. Downs, “After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War” (Harvard UP, 2015)
Oct 9, 2019 • 82 min
On April 8, 1865, after four years of civil war, General Robert E. Lee wrote to General Ulysses S. Grant asking for peace. Peace was beyond his authority to negotiate, Grant replied, but surrender terms he would discuss. As Gregory P. Downs, Professor of…
Is Military History Worth Studying?
Oct 9, 2019 • 57 min
Military history is thought by some to be a valuable field of study to both professional soldiers and civilians. It is indeed one of the most popular fields in the genre of history. And yet many academics tend to look down upon the field as fundamentally…
Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres, “Black British Migrants in Cuba” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Oct 9, 2019 • 52 min
Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres’ new book Black British Migrants in Cuba: Race, Labor, and Empire in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean, 1898–1948 (Cambridge University Press, 2018) invites readers to enter the world of empire and labor migration in all its…
Mark McClish, “The History of the Arthaśāstra: Sovereignty and Sacred Law in Ancient India” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 9, 2019 • 43 min
Was ancient India ruled by politics or religion? In The History of the Arthaśāstra: Sovereignty and Sacred Law in Ancient India (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Mark McClish explores the Arthaśāstra (ancient India’s foundational treatise on statecraft…
Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi, “Revolution and Its Discontents: Political Thought and Reform in Iran” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 8, 2019 • 60 min
In this new book, Revolution and its Discontents, Political Thought and Reform in Iran (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi’s (of Goldsmiths University of London) studies the rise and evolution of reformist political thought in…
Paul Musselwhite, “Urban Dreams, Rural Commonwealth: The Rise of Plantation Society in the Chesapeake” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Oct 8, 2019 • 33 min
Early American colonialism is often distinguished by an urban and rural divide. Urban development was a sign of imperial progress. British writers frequently boasted about the size of early Boston and Philadelphia while mocking the scattered settlements…
Cécile Vidal, “Caribbean New Orleans: Empire, Race, and the Making of a Slave Society” (UNC Press, 2019)
Oct 8, 2019 • 58 min
Combining Atlantic and imperial perspectives,Caribbean New Orleans: Empire, Race, and the Making of a Slave Society (University of North Carolina Press and the Omohundro Institute, 2019), offers a lively portrait of the city and a probing investigation of…
Kim A. Wagner, “The Skull of Alum Bheg: The Life and Death of a Rebel of 1857” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Oct 7, 2019 • 61 min
How did a Danish historian wind up with a human skull from colonial India in his University of London office? Kim A. Wagner’s The Skull of Alum Bheg: The Life and Death of a Rebel of 1857(Oxford University Press, 2018) tells two stories. The first…
Perin Gürel, “The Limits of Westernization: A Cultural History of America in Turkey” (Columbia UP, 2017)
Oct 6, 2019 • 37 min
In today’s podcast, host Robert Elliott speaks with Dr. Perin Gürel about her new book The Limits of Westernization: A Cultural History of America in Turkey(Columbia University Press, 2017), which examines how Turkish perceptions of the United States…
Evan Bennett, “When Tobacco Was King: Families, Farm Labor, and Federal Policy in the Piedmont” (UP Florida, 2014)
Oct 4, 2019 • 45 min
Professor Evan Bennett of Florida Atlantic University, author of When Tobacco Was King: Families, Farm Labor, and Federal Policy in the Piedmont (University Press of Florida, 2015) discusses the development and demise of family tobacco farms, tobacco…
Erika Milam, “Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Oct 4, 2019 • 41 min
Erika Milam talks about the scientific search for human nature, a project that captured the attention of paleontologists, anthropologists, and primatologists in the years after World War II. Milam is a professor of history at Princeton University. She is…
Susan Goodier, “Women Will Vote: Winning Suffrage in New York State” (Cornell UP, 2017)
Oct 3, 2019 • 70 min
In their co-authored book, Women Will Vote: Winning Suffrage in New York State(Cornell University Press, 2017), Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello examine the many distinct, yet interconnected, groups that fought for women’s suffrage in New York State…
Grégoire Mallard, “Gift Exchange: The Transnational History of a Political Idea” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Oct 3, 2019 • 89 min
Since Marcel Mauss published his foundational essay “The Gift” in 1925, many anthropologists and specialists of international relations have seen in the exchange of gifts, debts, loans, concessions or reparations the sources of international solidarity…
Leah Price, “What We Talk About When We Talk About Books: The History and Future of Reading” (Basic Books, 2019)
Oct 3, 2019 • 42 min
Let’s talk about books! How, when, and what do you like to read? Have you ever thought about the history of books and reading? How about shape, size, or texture of your book? Where do books go after they’ve been digitized? Harvard University professor…
Nancy Langston, “Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing World” (Yale UP, 2017)
Oct 1, 2019 • 59 min
When people today visit or imagine Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake in the world, they often perceive a cold, remote, and pristine body of water, relatively untouched by industrialization. Yet, Lake Superior has experienced substantial…
Jeremy Black, “England in the Age of Shakespeare” (Indiana UP, 2019)
Sep 30, 2019 • 37 min
Jeremy Black’s impressive new book offers an enormously wide-ranging account of the social, political and religious cultures in which England’s greatest dramatist was formed and found success. England in the Age of Shakespeare (Indiana University Press,…
Evan N. Dawley, “Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s-1950s” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Sep 30, 2019 • 67 min
How was the Taiwanese identity constructed? Dr. Evan N. Dawley, an associate professor of history at Goucher College, explores this question in his new book Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s-1950s(Harvard University Press, 2019).…
Brittany Lehman, “Teaching Migrant Children in West Germany and Europe, 1945-1992” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
Sep 30, 2019 • 68 min
In her new book, Teaching Migrant Children in West Germany and Europe, 1945-1992 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), Brittany Lehman examines the right to education for migrant children in Europe between 1949 and 1992. Using West Germany as a case study to…
Timothy LeCain, “The Matter of History: How Things Create the Past” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Sep 30, 2019 • 66 min
Timothy LeCain is an award-winning environmental historian whose past work has focused on the connections between open-pit copper mines, technology, and the natural world. LeCain’s newest book The Matter of History: How Things Create the Past (Cambridge…
Nicholas Walton, ”Singapore Singapura: From Miracle to Complacency” (Hurst, 2019)
Sep 27, 2019 • 63 min
Nicholas Walton’s Singapore Singapura: From Miracle to Complacency (Hurst, 2019) is far more than a portrait of the rise of a resource-poor nation that has become a model of economic development, governance and management of inter-communal relations. Part…
Yan Li, “China’s Soviet Dream: Propaganda, Culture, and Popular Imagination” (Routledge, 2018)
Sep 27, 2019 • 66 min
The warmth of China and Russia’s present-day relationship is sometimes said to reprise 1950s ties between Mao’s PRC and the Soviet Union, even if that remains a poorly understood period in both countries. Still less understood, moreover, is the deep…
Geoffrey Parker, “Emperor: A New Life of Charles V” (Yale UP, 2019)
Sep 27, 2019 • 54 min
The Emperor Charles V (1500–1558), ruler of Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, the Netherlands, and much of Italy and Central and South America, has long intrigued many scholars of early modern Europe. But the elusive nature of the man (despite an abundance of…
Tyson Reeder, “Smugglers, Pirates, and Patriots: Free Trade in the Age of Revolution” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
Sep 26, 2019 • 77 min
After emerging victorious from their revolution against the British Empire, many North Americans associated commercial freedom with independence and republicanism. Optimistic about the liberation movements sweeping Latin America, they were particularly…
Nora Jaffary, “Reproduction and its Discontents in Mexico: Childbirth and Contraception from 1750 to 1905” (UNC Press, 2016)
Sep 26, 2019 • 70 min
Nora Jaffary’s Reproduction and its Discontents in Mexico: Childbirth and Contraception from 1750 to 1905 (University of North Carolina Press. 2016), tracks how medical ideas, practices, and policies surrounding reproduction changed between the late…
Jonathan Sarna, “American Judaism: A History” (Yale UP, 2019)
Sep 25, 2019 • 56 min
American Judaism: A History (Yale University Press; second edition, 2019) chronicles the 350-year history of the Jewish religion in America. Tracing American Judaism from its origins in the colonial era through the present day, Jonathan Sarna explores the…
Christopher E. Mauriello, “Forced Confrontations: The Politics of Dead Bodies in Germany at the End of World War II” (Lexington Books, 2017)
Sep 25, 2019 • 40 min
Christopher Mauriello’s groundbreaking book Forced Confrontations: The Politics of Dead Bodies in Germany at the End of World War II(Lexington Books, 2017) focuses on American soldiers reactions to the victims of the Holocaust. Using photographs, memoirs,…
Humphrey Davies and Lesley Lababid, “A Field Guide to the Street Names of Central Cairo” (AU in Cairo Press, 2018)
Sep 25, 2019 • 58 min
Guides have been written to the city of Cairo for generations. Whether they’re for foreigners who’ve come to the city or its residents. However, it might be safe to say thatA Field Guide to the Street Names of Central Cairo (American University of Cairo…
Benjamin Kahan, “The Book of Minor Perverts: Sexology, Etiology, and the Emergences of Sexuality” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Sep 24, 2019 • 44 min
In this installment of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Benjamin Kahan, Associate Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies at LSU, about his newest work, The Book of Minor Perverts: Sexology, Etiology, and the Emergences of Sexuality…
Elizabeth Herbin-Triant, “Race, Class, and Campaigns to Legislate Jim Crow Neighborhoods” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Sep 24, 2019 • 38 min
Elizabeth Herbin-Triant is the author of Threatening Property: Race, Class, and Campaigns to Legislate Jim Crow Neighborhoods, published by Columbia University Press in 2019. Threatening Property examines the campaigns for residential segregation in…
David A. F. Sweet, “Three Seconds in Munich: The Controversial 1972 Olympic Basketball Final” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Sep 24, 2019 • 39 min
One. Two. Three. That’s as long as it took to sear the souls of a dozen young American men, thanks to the craziest, most controversial finish in the history of the Olympics—the 1972 gold-medal basketball contest between the United States of America and…
Matthew Hughes, “Britain’s Pacification of Palestine” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Sep 24, 2019 • 54 min
In his splendid military history of Britain’s pacification of the Arab revolt in Palestine, Britain’s Pacification of Palestine: The British Army, the Colonial State, and the Arab Revolt, 1936-1939 (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Professor Matthew…
Jeremy Black, “A Brief History of Italy” (Robinson, 2019)
Sep 24, 2019 • 58 min
Despite the Roman Empire’s 500-year reign over Europe, parts of Africa and the Middle East, Italy does not have the same long national history as states such as France or England. Divided for much of its history, Italy’s regions have been, at various…
Alexander Rocklin, “The Regulation of Religion and the Making of Hinduism in Colonial Trinidad” (UNC Press, 2019)
Sep 23, 2019 • 45 min
Beginning in the mid 19th century, thousands of indentured laborers traveled from India to the Caribbean, and many settled in Trinidad. In The Regulation of Religion and the Making of Hinduism in Colonial Trinidad (University of North Carolina Press,…
Claudia Leal, “Landscapes of Freedom: Building a Postemancipation Society in the Rainforests of Western Colombia” (U Arizona Press, 2018)
Sep 23, 2019 • 66 min
Claudia Leal’s Landscapes of Freedom: Building a Postemancipation Society in the Rainforests of Western Colombia (University of Arizona Press, 2018), narrates the unknown history of the transition from slavery to freedom in the Pacific lowlands of…
Emily Skidmore, “True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the 20th Century” (NYU Press, 2017)
Sep 23, 2019 • 63 min
In True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the 20th Century (New York University Press, 2017), Emily Skidmore weaves in a vibrant discussion on how trans men created community and crafted their lives in rural America at the turn of the twentieth…
Mark Roseman, “Lives Reclaimed: A Story of Rescue and Resistance in Nazi Germany” (Metropolitan Books, 2019)
Sep 20, 2019 • 65 min
What makes some people aid the persecuted while others just stand by? Questions about rescue and resistance have been fundamental to the field of genocide studies since its inception. Mark Roseman offers a sophisticated and deeply human exploration of…
Melissa E. Sanchez, “Queer Faith: Reading Promiscuity and Race in the Secular Love Tradition” (NYU Press, 2019)
Sep 19, 2019 • 66 min
Putting premodern theology and poetry in dialogue with contemporary theory and politics, Queer Faith: Reading Promiscuity and Race in the Secular Love Tradition (NYU Press, 2019) reassess the commonplace view that a modern veneration of sexual monogamy…
Jasper Heinzen, “Making Prussians, Raising Germans: A Cultural History of Prussian State-Building after Civil War, 1866-1935” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Sep 19, 2019 • 80 min
How does civil war shape state building and national identity over the long term? What do the underlying conflicts between Hanoverians and the Prussian state reveal about the course of German history from 1866 up to the rise of Hitler? In his new book…
Scott Heerman, “The Alchemy of Slavery: Human Bondage and Emancipation in the Illinois Country” (U Pennsylvania, 2018)
Sep 19, 2019 • 54 min
Scott Heerman is the author of The Alchemy of Slavery: Human Bondage and Emancipation in the Illinois Country, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2018. The Alchemy of Slavery examines how slavery and emancipation developed in the…
Milton Gaither, “Homeschool: An American History” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
Sep 18, 2019 • 30 min
With around two million children currently enrolled in home schools in the USA, no-one can doubt that the subject of Milton Gaither’s new book is timely. Gaither, a professor of education at Messiah College, PA, first published this study in 2008, but has…
Sara Georgini, “Household Gods: The Religious Lives of the Adams Family” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 18, 2019 • 54 min
Sara Georgini is a historian and series editor for The Papers of John Adams at the Massachusetts Historical Society. Household Gods: The Religious Lives of the Adams Family (Oxford University Press, 2019) is a family biography that explores the Christian…
Charlie Laderman, “Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention, and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 18, 2019 • 72 min
In Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention, and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order (Oxford University Press, 2019), Charlie Laderman exposes the way that imperial ambitions suffused the ideas and practices of…
Jennifer Jensen Wallach, “What We Need Ourselves: How Food has Shaped African American Life” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
Sep 18, 2019 • 56 min
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Jennifer Jensen Wallach about the her book Getting What We Need Ourselves: How Food has Shaped African American Life (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019). The book covers a wide chronology and geography from…
Gregg L. Frazer, “God against the Revolution: The Loyalist Clergy’s Case Against the American Revolution” (UP of Kansas, 2018)
Sep 18, 2019 • 36 min
Not everyone was convinced by the arguments of patriots during the American revolution. Among those who retained some degree of loyalty to the British crown were the majority of the clergy of the Episcopalian Church, as well as a smaller number of clergy…
Mark Burford, “Mahalia Jackson and the Black Gospel Field” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 17, 2019 • 60 min
Mahalia Jackson, the great mid-twentieth century gospel singer, thought of herself as an embodiment of the history of African Americans in the United States. She understood that her family’s background, as they moved from enslavement in Louisiana to…
Michael F. Conlin, “The Constitutional Origins of the American Civil War” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Sep 17, 2019 • 72 min
In an incisive analysis of over two dozen clauses as well as several ‘unwritten’ rules and practices, The Constitutional Origins of the American Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2019) shows how the Constitution aggravated the sectional conflict over…
Larry E. Morris, “A Documentary History of the Book of Mormon” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 17, 2019 • 51 min
The story of the creation of the Book of Mormon has been told many times, and often ridiculed. A Documentary History of the Book of Mormon (Oxford University Press, 2019), by Larry E. Morris, presents and examines the primary sources surrounding the…
Miroslava Chávez-García, “Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands” (UNC Press, 2018)
Sep 17, 2019 • 56 min
Miroslava Chávez-García is the author of Migrant Longing: Letter Writing across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2018. Migrant Longing is a history of migration, courtship, and identity across the…
Alex J. Kay, “The Making of an SS Killer: the Life of Colonel Alfred Filbert, 1905-1990” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Sep 16, 2019 • 47 min
Alex Kay’s The Making of an SS Killer: the Life of Colonel Alfred Filbert, 1905-1990 (Cambridge University Press, 2016) is a must read for those interested in the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and World War II. Focusing on the actions and consequences of a…
Evdoxios Doxiadis, “State, Nationalism, and the Jewish Communities of Modern Greece” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018)
Sep 16, 2019 • 50 min
How did minorities fit into the new Greek state during the country’s transition from imperial rule to national sovereignty? How did the relationship between Greece and its Jewish minorities, in particular, shift as definitions of national belonging…
Joy McCann, “Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean” (U New South Wales Press, 2018)
Sep 13, 2019 • 35 min
Joy McCann discusses the great circumpolar ocean that surrounds Antarctica. McCann is the author of Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean (University of New South Wales Press, 2018). She is a historian at the Centre for Environmental History at…
Lawrence Glickman, “Free Enterprise: An American History” (Yale UP, 2019)
Sep 13, 2019 • 60 min
“Free enterprise” is an everyday phrase that connotes an American common sense. It appears everywhere from political speeches to pop culture. And it is so central to the idea of the United States that some even labeled Christopher Columbus and the…
Elizabeth D. Carney, “Eurydice and the Birth of Macedonian Power” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 12, 2019 • 56 min
As the wife of a Macedonian king and the mother of three sons who would succeed him, Eurydice played an important role in Macedonia at an important moment in the kingdom’s history. In Eurydice and the Birth of Macedonian Power(Oxford University Press,…
Alexandra Minna Stern, “White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination” (Beacon Press, 2019)
Sep 11, 2019 • 66 min
In this episode, Dr. Alexandra Minna Stern and I discuss her latest book, Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination (Beacon Press, 2019). Our conversation examines the intersections of gender and sexuality,…
Aaron Hale-Dorrell, “Corn Crusade: Khrushchev’s Farming Revolution in the Post-Stalin Soviet Union” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Sep 11, 2019 • 77 min
In Corn Crusade: Khrushchev’s Farming Revolution in the Post-Stalin Soviet Union (Oxford University Press, 2018), Aaron Hale-Dorrell re-evaluates Khrushchev’s corn campaign as the cornerstone of his reformation programs. Corn was key to Khrushchev’s…
Jeffrey Ostler, “Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas” (Yale UP, 2019)
Sep 11, 2019 • 53 min
Jeffrey Ostler’s Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas (Yale University Press, 2019) is the first of what will be a two-volume set that comprehensively chronicles the devastating effects…
Bathsheba Demuth, “Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait” (W. W. Norton, 2019)
Sep 10, 2019 • 54 min
Whales and walruses, caribou and fox, gold and oil: through the stories of these animals and resources, Bathsheba Demuth reveals how people have turned ecological wealth in a remote region into economic growth and state power for more than 150 years. The…
William Sturkey, “Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Sep 10, 2019 • 27 min
If you really want to understand Jim Crow—what it was and how African Americans rose up to defeat it—you should start by visiting Mobile Street in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, the heart of the historic black downtown. There you can see remnants of the shops…
Kate Kirkpatrick, “Becoming Beauvoir: A Life” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Sep 10, 2019 • 55 min
Kate Kirkpatrick a lecturer in Religion, Philosophy and Culture at King’s College London and author of Becoming Beauvoir: A Life (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). Kirkpatrick has given us a biography that addresses the puzzle and contradictions of the life of…
Chiara Russo Krauss, “Wundt, Avenarius and Scientific Psychology: A Debate at the Turn of the Twentieth Century” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019)
Sep 10, 2019 • 66 min
At the start of the 19th century, the field we now call psychology was still the branch of philosophy that studied the soul. How did psychology come to define itself as a separate area of inquiry, and how did it come to be a science? In Wundt, Avenarius…
Amanda L. Tyler, “Habeas Corpus in Wartime: From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Sep 9, 2019 • 65 min
Amanda L. Tyler is the author of Habeas Corpus in Wartime: From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay, published by Oxford University Press in 2017. Habeas Corpus in Wartime is a comprehensive history of the writ of habeas corpus in Anglo-America. From…
Christine M. DeLucia, “Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast” (Yale UP, 2018)
Sep 9, 2019 • 55 min
Christine M. DeLucia is the author of Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast, published by Yale University Press in 2018. Memory Lands provides a much needed new account of King Philip’s War which centers the Natives of…
Rico Issacs, “Film and Identity in Kazakhstan: Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture in Central Asia” (I.B. Tauris, 2018)
Sep 9, 2019 • 58 min
In Film and Identity in Kazakhstan: Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture in Central Asia (I.B. Tauris, 2018), Rico Issacs uses cinema as an analytical tool to demonstrate the constructed and contested nature of Kazakh national identity. By first tracing the…
Shayne Legassie, “The Medieval Invention of Travel” (U Chicago Press, 2017)
Sep 6, 2019 • 40 min
Shayne Legassie talks about medieval travel, especially long distance travel, and the way it was feared, praised, and sometimes treated with suspicion. He also talks about the role the Middle Ages played in creating modern conceptions of travel and travel…
Lawrence B. A. Hatter, “Citizens of Convenience: The Imperial Origins of American Nationhood” (U Virginia Press, 2016)
Sep 6, 2019 • 70 min
Today I talked to Lawrence B. A. Hatter about his book, Citizens of Convenience: The Imperial Origins of American Nationhood (University of Virginia Press, 2016). Citizens of Convenience documents how traders in the northern borderlands of the early…
Matthew Crow, “Thomas Jefferson, Legal History, and the Art of Recollection” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Sep 5, 2019 • 63 min
Today I talked to Matthew Crow about his book Thomas Jefferson, Legal History, and the Art of Recollection, published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. Crow studies how Jefferson’s association with legal history was born out of America’s long history…
Hendrik Hartog, “The Trouble with Minna: A Case of Slavery and Emancipation in the Antebellum North” (UNC Press, 2018)
Sep 5, 2019 • 26 min
In this episode of the American Society for Legal History’s podcast Talking Legal History Siobhan talks with Hendrik Hartog about his book The Trouble with Minna: A Case of Slavery and Emancipation in the Antebellum North (UNC Press, 2018). The Trouble…
Anne M. Kornhauser, “Debating the American State: Liberal Anxieties and the New Leviathan, 1930-1970” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2015)
Sep 5, 2019 • 50 min
The New Deal left a host of political, institutional, and economic legacies. Among them was the restructuring of the government into an administrative state with a powerful executive leader and a large class of unelected officials. This “leviathan” state…
Patrick Andelic, “Donkey Work: Congressional Democrats in Conservative America, 1974-1994” (UP of Kansas, 2019)
Sep 5, 2019 • 39 min
What happened to the Democratic Party after the 1960s? In many political histories, the McGovern defeat of 1972 announced the party’s decline—and the conservative movement’s ascent. What the conventional narrative neglects, Patrick Andelic submits, is the…
Elizabeth S. Kassab, “Enlightenment on the Eve of Revolution: The Egyptian and Syrian Debates” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Sep 4, 2019 • 59 min
The “Arab Spring” shook the world in 2011, revealing profound dissatisfaction throughout the Middle East and North Africa, as people throughout the region took to the streets demanding dramatic political change. The uprisings have been analyzed by…
Kevin M. Levin, “Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth” (UNC Press, 2019)
Sep 4, 2019 • 43 min
Kevin M. Levin is the author of Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2019. Searching for Black Confederates investigates the claims that numerous African Americans…
Vincent DiGirolamo, “Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 4, 2019 • 29 min
Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys (Oxford University Press, 2019) looks at the legion of children and teenagers who sold newspapers on city streets, moving trains, and even Civil War battlefields in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Author…
Charles King, “Gods of the Upper Air: How A Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century” (Doubleday, 2019)
Sep 4, 2019 • 62 min
American anthropologists consider Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead to be foundational figures, but outside the academy few people know the details of their ideas. In this new volume, Charles King provides a carefully-researched and…
Katie Jarvis, “Politics in the Marketplace: Work, Gender, and Citizenship in Revolutionary France” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Sep 4, 2019 • 50 min
The king’s guards became increasingly nervous as they watched nearly 7,000 individuals march on Versailles on October 5, 1789. The crowd approaching the king’s chateau was overwhelmingly composed of women who were determined to make their grievances…
Bianca Premo, “The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Sep 2, 2019 • 71 min
Bianca Premo’s award-winning book The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire, published by Oxford University Press in 2017, makes a powerful yet seemingly simple claim: during the eighteenth century, illiterate…
Alma Jeftić, “Social Aspects of Memory: Stories of Victims and Perpetrators from Bosnia-Herzegovina” (Routledge, 2019)
Sep 2, 2019 • 57 min
In her new book, Social Aspects of Memory: Stories of Victims and Perpetrators from Bosnia-Herzegovina (Routledge, 2019). Alma Jeftić presents the compelling results of an empirical psychological study on how ordinary people remember war, drawing on…
Jay Sexton, “A Nation Forged by Crisis: A New American History” (Basic Books, 2018)
Sep 2, 2019 • 57 min
A popular myth in the American nationalist imaginary is that the country has been on a continued path of progress. Another is that the country’s history has been the self-realization of the principles laid out in the Declaration of Independence. Jay…
David Doddington, “Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Sep 2, 2019 • 39 min
Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South (Cambridge University Press, 2018) demonstrates the significance of internal divisions, comparison, and conflict in shaping gender and status in slave communities of the American South. David Doddington…
Emily Dufton, “Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America” (Basic Books, 2017)
Aug 30, 2019 • 36 min
Marijuana. Weed. Cannabis. Pot. Whatever term you use, this intoxicant and medical product leads to long discussions. Emily Dufton visits the podcast to talk about the ups and downs and highs and lows of cannabis in the United States, all detailed in her…
Erik Loomis, ”Empire of Timber: Labor Unions and the Pacific Northwest Forests” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Aug 30, 2019 • 41 min
In Empire of Timber: Labor Unions and the Pacific Northwest Forests (Cambridge University Press, 2015), the historian Erik Loomis examines the relationship between workers and their environments in this century-long history of timber workers in the…
Jenny Huangfu Day, “Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Aug 29, 2019 • 54 min
Historians in the English-speaking world have long studied how European and American travelers and diplomats conceptualized China, but, especially in recent years, few scholars have attempted to thoroughly understand the reverse—how Qing envoys…
Andrew Newman, “Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities” (UNC Press, 2019)
Aug 29, 2019 • 97 min
In Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities (University of North Carolina Press—Chapel Hill & The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2019), Andrew Newman, Professor of English at Stony Brook University,…
Jennifer C. Lena, “Entitled: Discriminating Tastes and the Expansion of the Arts” ( Princeton UP, 2019)
Aug 29, 2019 • 36 min
How did American elites change the meaning of Art? In Entitled: Discriminating Tastes and the Expansion of the Arts (Princeton University Press, 2019), Jennifer C. Lena, associate professor of arts administration at Colombia University, charts the history…
Arik Moran, “Kingship and Polity on the Himalayan Borderland” (Amsterdam UP, 2019)
Aug 28, 2019 • 54 min
What role did women play in securing power in colonial Himalayan kingdoms? Kingship and Polity on the Himalayan Borderland (Amsterdam UP, 2019) specifically documents the key roles played by women - especially queen regents - in the modern transformation…
Niambi Michele Carter, “American While Black: African Americans, Immigration, and the Limits of Citizenship” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Aug 28, 2019 • 33 min
Just in time for the APSA annual meeting, Niambi Michele Carter has written an incredibly timely book on a central issue to American politics, American While Black: African Americans, Immigration, and the Limits of Citizenship (Oxford University Press,…
Jesse Cromwell, “The Smugglers’ World: Illicit Trade and Atlantic Communities in Eighteenth-Century Venezuela” (UNC Press, 2018)
Aug 28, 2019 • 52 min
Chocolate – nothing is more irresistible for a decadent treat or a rich drink to warm you on a cold winter’s evening. In eighteenth-century Venezuela, cacao became a life source for the colony. Neglected by the Spanish fleet system, Venezuelan colonists…
Frank Dikötter, “Mao’s Great Famine” (Bloomsbury, 2011)
Aug 27, 2019 • 62 min
In the years he ruled the People’s Republic of China, Mao Zedong presided over the greatest mass murder in human history, both in his elimination of millions of perceived political enemies and also in the starving of tens of millions in callously…
Brett Krutzsch, “Dying to Be Normal: Gay Martyrs and the Transformation of American Sexual Politics” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Aug 27, 2019 • 45 min
On October 14, 1998, five thousand people gathered on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to mourn the death of Matthew Shepard, a gay college student who had been murdered in Wyoming eight days earlier. Politicians and celebrities addressed the crowd and the…
Mark Braude, “The Invisible Emperor: Napoleon on Elba from Empire to Exile” (Penguin Press, 2018)
Aug 27, 2019 • 61 min
I must’ve been a kid when I first heard the palindrome “Able I was ere I saw Elba”. Napoleon didn’t mean a lot to me at the time. “Elba” meant even less. Decades later, I had learned a little more about Napoleon and his time there, but not that all that…
Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, “Racial Migrations: New York City and the Revolutionary Politics of the Spanish Caribbean” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Aug 27, 2019 • 89 min
In his new book, Racial Migrations: New York City and the Revolutionary Politics of the Spanish Caribbean (Princeton University Press, 2019), historian Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof seamlessly ties together various scholarly subfields into a truly transnational…
Graham Thompson, “Herman Melville: Among the Magazines” (U Massachusetts Press 2018)
Aug 26, 2019 • 53 min
“What I feel most moved to write, that is banned―it will not pay. Yet, altogether, write the otherway I cannot.” Herman Melville wrote these words as he struggled to survive as a failing novelist. Between 1853 and 1856, he did write “the other way,”…
Kevin Dawson, “Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Culture in the African Diaspora” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)
Aug 26, 2019 • 53 min
Long before the rise of New World slavery, West Africans were adept swimmers, divers, canoe makers, and canoeists. They lived along riverbanks, near lakes, or close to the ocean. In those waterways, they became proficient in diverse maritime skills, while…
Kevin Dawson, “Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Culture in the African Diaspora” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)
Aug 26, 2019 • 53 min
Long before the rise of New World slavery, West Africans were adept swimmers, divers, canoe makers, and canoeists. They lived along riverbanks, near lakes, or close to the ocean. In those waterways, they became proficient in diverse maritime skills, while…
Levi McLaughlin, “Soka Gakkai’s Human Revolution: The Rise of A Mimetic Nation in Modern Japan” (U Hawaii Press, 2018)
Aug 26, 2019 • 48 min
Being Japan’s largest and most influential new religious organization, Soka Gakkai (Society for the Creation of Value) and Soka Gakkai International (SGI) claims to have 12 million members in 192 countries around the world. Founded in the 1930s by a group…
William M. Gorvine, “Envisioning A Tibetan Luminary: The Life of a Modern Bonpo Saint” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Aug 26, 2019 • 66 min
In his new book, Envisioning A Tibetan Luminary: The Life of a Modern Bonpo Saint (Oxford University Press, 2018), William M. Gorvine provides a multifaceted analysis of Shardza Tashi Gyaltsen (1859-1934), one of the most prominent modern representatives…
Joseph M. Adelman, “Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
Aug 23, 2019 • 59 min
During the American Revolution, printed material, including newspapers, pamphlets, almanacs, and broadsides, played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. In Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789 (Johns…
David M. Wrobel, “America’s West: A History, 1890-1950” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Aug 23, 2019 • 79 min
In America’s West: A History, 1890-1950 (Cambridge University Press, 2017), David M. Wrobel describes a sixty year period of remarkable change for the vast region. By focusing on politics, demography, race, and cultural change, Wrobel argues that while…
Evgeny Finkel, “Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival during the Holocaust” (Princeton UP, 2017)
Aug 22, 2019 • 60 min
Can there be a political science of the Holocaust? Evgeny Finkel, in his new book Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival during the Holocaust(Princeton University Press, 2017), answers Charles King’s question with a resounding yes. Finkel is interested in a…
Simon Balto, “Occupied Territory: Policing Black Chicago From Red Summer to Black Power” (UNC Press, 2019)
Aug 22, 2019 • 75 min
Recent scholarship locates the origins of mass incarceration in national anticrime policy from 1960 to 1990, and has drastically reframed the “punitive turn” in American politics as bipartisan. But how then, do we reckon with the fact that most police…
Susan Jaques, “The Caesar of Paris: Napoleon Bonaparte, Rome, and the Artistic Obsession That Shaped An Empire” (Pegasus Books, 2018)
Aug 22, 2019 • 44 min
In her book, The Caesar of Paris: Napoleon Bonaparte, Rome, and the Artistic Obsession That Shaped An Empire (Pegasus Books, 2018), Susan Jaques offers up a richly detailed and researched account of Napoleon’s fascination with ancient Rome, and how this…
Max Ward, “Thought Crime: Ideology and State Power in Interwar Japan” (Duke UP, 2019)
Aug 22, 2019 • 70 min
Max Ward’s Thought Crime: Ideology and State Power in Interwar Japan (Duke University Press, 2019) analyzes the trajectory and transformations of the implementation of Japan’s 1925 Peace Preservation Law from its conception until the early years of the…
Danny Orbach, “Plots Against Hitler” (Eamon Dolan/HMH, 2016)
Aug 21, 2019 • 63 min
In his new book, Plots Against Hitler (Eamon Dolan/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016), Danny Orbach, Senior Lecturer at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem offers a profound and complete examination of the plots to assassinate Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. A…
Berthe Jansen, “The Monastery Rules: Buddhist Monastic Organization in Pre-Modern Tibet” (U California Press, 2018)
Aug 21, 2019 • 61 min
The Monastery Rules: Buddhist Monastic Organization in Pre-Modern Tibet (University of California Press, 2018) discusses the position of the monasteries in pre-1950s Tibetan Buddhist societies and how that position was informed by the far-reaching…
Douglas Irwin, “Clashing over Commerce: A History of US Trade Policy” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Aug 20, 2019 • 57 min
Scholars of US history have treated trade policy in less than enthusiastic ways. One economic historian described tariffs as “extraordinarily uninteresting things unless related to the political events which give them meaning.” While another historian…
M. David Litwa, “How the Gospels Became History: Jesus and Mediterranean Myths” (Yale UP, 2019)
Aug 19, 2019 • 61 min
Did the early Christians believe their myths? Like most ancient—and modern—people, early Christians made efforts to present their myths in the most believable ways. In How the Gospels Became History: Jesus and Mediterranean Myths (Yale University Press,…
Joshua D. Farrington, “Black Republicans and the Transformation of the GOP” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2016)
Aug 19, 2019 • 77 min
Reflecting on his fifty-year effort to steer the Grand Old Party toward black voters, Memphis power broker George W. Lee declared, “Somebody had to stay in the Republican Party and fight.” As Joshua D. Farrington, Instructor in African & African-American…
Max Oidtmann, “Forging the Golden Urn: The Qing Empire and the Politics of Reincarnation in Tibet” (Columbia UP, 2018)
Aug 19, 2019 • 75 min
In 1995, the People’s Republic of China resurrected the technology of the “Golden Urn,” a Qing-era tool which involves the identification of the reincarnations of prominent Tibetan Buddhist monks by drawing lots from a golden vessel. Why would the Chinese…
Dean Itsuji Saranillio, “Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood” (Duke UP, 2018)
Aug 19, 2019 • 73 min
In Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood (Duke University Press, 2018), Dean Itsuji Saranillio offers a bold challenge to conventional understandings of Hawai‘i’s admission as a U.S. state. Hawai‘i statehood is popularly…
Kent Gramm, “Gettysburg: The Living and the Dead” (Southern Illinois UP, 2019)
Aug 16, 2019 • 55 min
Using a mixture of genres, Kent Gramm captures the voices of those past and present in his book, Gettysburg: The Living and the Dead(Southern Illinois University Press, 2019) Alongside stunning photographs by Chris Heisey, Gramm shares the experiences of…
Matthew James, “Collecting Evolution: The Galapagos Expedition that Vindicated Darwin” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Aug 16, 2019 • 33 min
Matthew James talks about the 1905 Galapagos Expedition organized by the California Academy of Sciences. James is a professor of geology at Sonoma State University. He is the author of Collecting Evolution: The Galapagos Expedition that Vindicated Darwin…
Douglas K. Miller, “Indians on the Move: Native American Mobility and Urbanization in the Twentieth Century” (UNC Press, 2019)
Aug 16, 2019 • 101 min
In 1972, the Bureau of Indian Affairs terminated its twenty-year-old Voluntary Relocation Program, which encouraged the mass migration of roughly 100,000 Native American people from rural to urban areas. At the time the program ended, many groups—from…
Martin T. Fromm, “Borderland Memories: Searching for Historical Identity in Post-Mao China” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Aug 16, 2019 • 70 min
With China’s northwestern and southern edges justifiably being sources of global attention at present, Martin Fromm’s Borderland Memories: Searching for Historical Identity in Post-Mao China (Cambridge University Press, 2019) has much light to shed on how…
Shelby Wynn Schwartz, ”The Bodies of Others: Drag Dances and Their Afterlives” (U Michigan Press, 2019)
Aug 16, 2019 • 55 min
Selby Wynn Schwartz writes about gender, performance, and the politics of embodiment. Her articles have been published in Women & Performance, PAJ, Dance Research Journal, TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Critical Correspondence, Ballet-Dance Magazine,…
Mary-Elizabeth Murphy, “Jim Crow Capital: Women and Black Freedom Struggles in Washington, DC, 1920-1945” (UNC Press, 2018)
Aug 16, 2019 • 53 min
Though women’s roles in the black freedom struggle remain under-acknowledged, scholars continue to make their importance clear. In her new book, Jim Crow Capital: Women and Black Freedom Struggles in Washington, DC, 1920-1945 (University of North Carolina…
Emma Kuby, “Political Survivors: The Resistance, the Cold War, and the Fight against Concentration Camps After 1945” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Aug 16, 2019 • 61 min
Emma Kuby’s new book, Political Survivors: The Resistance, the Cold War, and the Fight against Concentration Camps After 1945 (Cornell UP, 2019) traces the fascinating history of the International Commission Against the Concentration Camp Regime (CICRC)…
Daniel Veidlinger, “From Indra’s Net to Internet: Communication, Technology, and the Evolution of Buddhist Ideas” (U Hawaii Press, 2018)
Aug 15, 2019 • 57 min
In this episode of New Books in Buddhist Studies, I am joined by Daniel Veidlinger to discuss his exciting new book From Indra’s Net to Internet: Communication, Technology, and the Evolution of Buddhist Ideas (University of Hawaii Press, 2018), which…
Lisa Greenwald, “Daughters of 1968: Redefining French Feminism and the Women’s Liberation Movement” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Aug 15, 2019 • 53 min
May ’68 marked a watershed moment in French society, culture, and political life. The feminist movement was no exception. Women took to the streets and meeting halls around the country, challenging outdated sexual standards, fighting for reproductive…
Stephen Alan Bourque, “Beyond the Beach: The Allied War Against France” (Naval Institute Press, 2018)
Aug 14, 2019 • 66 min
Did the Allied bombing plan for the liberation of France follow a carefully orchestrated plan, or was it executed on an ad-hoc basis with little concern or regard for collateral damage? How did the bombing of French cities and railheads follow – or…
Sabine Frühstück, “Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan” (U California Press, 2017)
Aug 14, 2019 • 45 min
In Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan (University of California Press, 2017), Sabine Frühstück shows how children and childhood have been used in twentieth century Japan as technologies to moralize war, and later, in the…
J. C. D. Clark, “Thomas Paine: Britain, America, and France in the Age of Enlightenment and Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Aug 14, 2019 • 31 min
There are few better guides to the “long eighteenth century” that J. C. D. Clark, emeritus professor of history at the University of Kansas, whose sequence of ground-breaking books have contested prevailing assumptions about religion, politics and early…
Kevin M. Baron, “Presidential Privilege and the Freedom of Information Act” (Edinburgh UP, 2019)
Aug 14, 2019 • 56 min
Kevin Baron’s new book, Presidential Privilege and the Freedom of Information Act (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), is a fascinating analysis of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and how this act, passed in the 1960s and signed by President Lyndon…
Meredith Oda, “The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Aug 14, 2019 • 90 min
In The Gateway to the Pacific: Japanese Americans and the Remaking of San Francisco (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Meredith Oda shows how city leaders and local residents in San Francisco fashioned a postwar municipal identity through their…
Carol J. Adams, “Burger” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
Aug 13, 2019 • 66 min
In this this interview, Dr. Carrie Tippen talks with Carol J. Adams about two new books: Burger, from the Object Lessons series by Bloomsbury (2018), and Protest Kitchen, a cookbook with over 50 vegan recipes and practical daily actions from Conari press.…
Margaret O’Mara, “The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America” (Penguin Press, 2019)
Aug 13, 2019 • 62 min
Seventy years ago, there was no Apple Campus or Googleplex. Silicon Valley itself didn’t even exist! The region was filled with sleepy towns, prune trees, and orange groves. Since then, the cluster of computer-related companies based in Silicon Valley has…
David Gaunt, “Let Them Not Return” (Berghahn Books, 2017)
Aug 13, 2019 • 52 min
Sometimes it seems that there’s nothing left to say about mass violence in the 20th century. But the new edited volume Let Them Not Return: Sayfo – The Genocide Against the Assyrian, Syriac, and Chaldean Christians in the Ottoman Empire (Berghahn Books,…
Joseph U. Lenti, “Redeeming the Revolution: The State and Organized Labor in Post-Tlatelolco Mexico” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
Aug 13, 2019 • 52 min
Dr. Joseph U. Lenti’s Redeeming the Revolution: The State and Organized Labor in Post-Tlatelolco Mexico (University of Nebraska Press, 2017) focuses on state-labor relations in the decade directly following the massacre of peacefully protesting students…
David Philip Miller, “The Life and Legend of James Watt” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
Aug 13, 2019 • 71 min
For all of his fame as one of the seminal figures of the Industrial Revolution, James Watt is a person around whom many misconceptions congregate. In The Life and Legend of James Watt: Collaboration, Natural Philosophy, and the Improvement of the Steam…
Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan, “Vagrants and Vagabonds: Poverty and Mobility in the Early American Republic” (NYU Press, 2019)
Aug 12, 2019 • 48 min
Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan is the author of Vagrants and Vagabonds: Poverty and Mobility in the Early American Republic, published by New York University Press in 2019. Vagrants and Vagabonds focuses on the control over poor migrants’ mobility and how…
Michael Lower, “The Tunis Crusade of 1270: A Mediterranean History” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Aug 12, 2019 • 65 min
Why was a Crusade that was initially meant for Syria end up in Tunis? How did the aspirations of the King of France and the Mamluk Sultan, the King of Sicily and the Hafsid Emir of Tunis, get entangled in the years following the Mongol invasion of the…
Andrew Wright Hurley, “Ludwig Leichhardt’s Ghosts: The Strange Career of a Traveling Myth” (Camden House, 2018)
Aug 9, 2019 • 35 min
Andrew Wright Hurley talks about the life and afterlife of the Prussian explorer Ludwig Leichhardt, a man whose reputation has shifted to reflect the changing cultures of Australia and Germany over the past 160 years. Hurley is an associate professor in…
Is the Idea of “The Enlightenment” Still Useful?
Aug 9, 2019 • 48 min
In a new podcast of the series ‘Arguing History’, Professor Jeremy Black, the most prolific historian writing in the Anglophone world, if not on the entire planet, and renowned Ecclesiastical Historian Professor William Gibson discuss the question: ‘is…
Michael Zakim, “Accounting for Capitalism: The World the Clerk Made” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Aug 8, 2019 • 77 min
The clerk attended his desk and counter at the intersection of two great themes of modern historical experience: the development of a market economy and of a society governed from below. Who better illustrates the daily practice and production of this…
Lynn Kaye, “Time In The Babylonian Talmud: Natural and Imagined Times in Jewish Law and Narrative” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Aug 8, 2019 • 51 min
The great writer Jorge Luis Borges said, “Time is the substance I am made of. Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire.” Time is the…
Robert Haug, “The Eastern Frontier: Limits of Empire in Late Antique and Early Medieval Central Asia” (I. B. Tauris, 2019)
Aug 8, 2019 • 63 min
Robert Haug’s new book, The Eastern Frontier: Limits of Empire in Late Antique and Early Medieval Central Asia (I. B. Tauris, 2019) is an in-depth look at the frontier zone of the Sassanian, Umayyad, and Abbasid Empires. Employing an impressive array of…
Lenora Warren, “Fire on the Water: Sailors, Slaves, and Insurrection in Early American Literature, 1789-1886” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
Aug 8, 2019 • 49 min
Lenora Warren about her book, Fire on the Water: Sailors, Slaves, and Insurrection in Early American Literature, 1789-1886, published by Rutgers University Press in 2019. Fire on the Water looks at the history of abolition and slave violence by looking at…
Erin-Marie Legacey, “Making Space for the Dead: Catacombs, Cemeteries, and the Reimagining of Paris, 1780-1830” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Aug 7, 2019 • 52 min
In Making Space for the Dead: Catacombs, Cemeteries, and the Reimagining of Paris, 1780-1830 (Cornell University Press, 2019), Dr. Erin-Marie Legacey, Assistant Professor of History at Texas Tech University, explores the transformation of burial practices…
Tsega Etefa, “The Origins of Ethnic Conflict in Africa: Politics and Violence in Darfur, Oromia, and the Tana Delta” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019)
Aug 7, 2019 • 52 min
Are ethnic conflicts in Africa the product of age-old ancient hatreds? Tsega Etefa’s new book, The Origins of Ethnic Conflict in Africa: Politics and Violence in Darfur, Oromia, and the Tana Delta (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019), provides an answer, arguing…
Mike Jay, “Mescaline: A Global History of the First Psychedelic” (Yale UP, 2019)
Aug 7, 2019 • 29 min
Psychedelics are not terribly new. And the drug mescaline is certainly not new. Mike Jay’s new book, Mescaline: A Global History of the First Psychedelic (Yale University Press, 2019), tells two trippy stories: one that is about Indigenous use and another…
Michael Beckley, “Unrivaled: Why America Will Remain the World’s Sole Superpower” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Aug 7, 2019 • 48 min
The United States has been the world’s dominant power for more than a century. Now many analysts and commentators believe that other countries such as China are rising and the United States is in decline. Is the era of American hegemony over? Is America…
Grégory Pierrot, “The Black Avenger in Atlantic Culture” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Aug 7, 2019 • 60 min
With the Ta-Nehisi Coates–authored Black Panther comic book series (2016), recent films Django Unchained (2012), The Birth of a Nation (2016), Nate Parker’s cinematic imagining of the Nat Turner rebellion, and screen adaptations of Marvel’s Luke Cage…
Julilly Kohler-Hausmann, “Getting Tough: Welfare and Imprisonment in 1970s America” (Princeton UP, 2017)
Aug 7, 2019 • 81 min
In 1970s America, politicians began “getting tough” on drugs, crime, and welfare. These campaigns helped expand the nation’s penal system, discredit welfare programs, and cast blame for the era’s social upheaval on racialized deviants that the state was…
Robert Crowcroft, “The End is Nigh: British Politics, Power, and the Road to the Second World War” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Aug 6, 2019 • 75 min
Few decades have given rise to such potent mythologies as the 1930s. Popular impressions of those years prior to the Second World War were shaped by the single outstanding personality of that conflict, Winston Spencer Churchill. Churchill depicted himself…
Elizabeth Otto, “Haunted Bauhaus: Occult Spirituality, Gender Fluidity, Queer Identities, and Radical Politics” (MIT Press, 2019)
Aug 6, 2019 • 74 min
In this segment of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Elizabeth “Libby” Otto, Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Studies and Executive Director of the Humanities Institute at the University of Buffalo about her forthcoming work,…
Sarah L. Quinn, “American Bonds: How Credit Markets Shaped a Nation” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Aug 6, 2019 • 25 min
Federal housing finance policy and mortgage-backed securities have gained widespread attention in recent years because of the 2008 financial crisis, but government credit has been part of American life since the nation’s founding. Sarah L. Quinn’s new…
Jessica Vantine Birkenholtz, “Reciting the Goddess: Narratives of Place and the Making of Hinduism in Nepal” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Aug 6, 2019 • 61 min
Jessica Vantine Birkenholtz’s Reciting the Goddess: Narratives of Place and the Making of Hinduism in Nepal (Oxford University, 2018) represents the very first study of a fascinating Hindu phenomenon: the Svasthanivratakatha (SVK), a sixteenth-century…
Matt Oram, “The Trials of Psychedelic Therapy: LSD Psychotherapy in America” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Aug 5, 2019 • 53 min
Are we in the midst of a psychedelic renaissance? If so, what can we learn about the present moment through the history of psychedelic experiments in the past? Matt Oram discusses contemporary debates about LSD and MDMA and brings much-needed context with…
Larry Holmes, “War, Evacuation, and the Exercise of Power: The Center, Periphery, and Kirov’s Pedagogical Institute, 1941–1952” (Lexington Books, 2012)
Aug 5, 2019 • 52 min
Larry Holmes’ book, which first appeared in English in 2012, was released in Russian this year. In War, Evacuation, and the Exercise of Power: The Center, Periphery, and Kirov’s Pedagogical Institute, 1941–1952 (Lexington Books, 2012), Holmes uses the…
Carl Hoffman, “The Last Wild Men of Borneo: A True Story of Death and Treasure” (William Morrow, 2019)
Aug 2, 2019 • 33 min
Journalist Carl Hoffman talks about Bruno Manser and Michael Palmieri, two men who arrived in Borneo with very different dreams and aspirations. Hoffman served as a contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler and Wired Magazine. He is the author…
Sharra L. Vostral, “Toxic Shock: A Social History” (NYU Press, 2018)
Aug 2, 2019 • 23 min
In 1978, doctors in Denver, Colorado observed several healthy children who suddenly and mysteriously developed a serious, life-threatening illness with no visible source. Their condition, which doctors dubbed ‘toxic shock syndrome’ (TSS) was rare, but…
Lukas Rieppel, “Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Aug 2, 2019 • 56 min
After the discoveries of dinosaur fossils in the American West in the late nineteenth century, the United States became world renown for vertebrate paleontology. In his new book Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a…
A. Lakhtikova, A. Brintlinger, and I. Glushchenko, “Seasoned Socialism: Gender and Food in Late Soviet Everyday Life” (Indiana UP, 2019)
Aug 1, 2019 • 62 min
In their introduction to Seasoned Socialism: Gender & Food in Late Soviet Everyday Life (Indiana University Press, 2019), Anastasia Lakhtikova, Angela Brintlinger, and Irina Glushchenko invite the reader to “imagine a society where food is managed by…
Andrius Gališanka, “John Rawls: The Path to a Theory of Justice” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Aug 1, 2019 • 73 min
It is hard to overestimate the influence of John Rawls on political philosophy and theory over the last half-century. His books have sold millions of copies worldwide, and he is one of the few philosophers whose work is known in the corridors of power as…
A. Ricardo López-Pedreros, “Makers of Democracy: A Transnational History of the Middle Classes in Colombia” (Duke UP, 2019)
Aug 1, 2019 • 39 min
This tightly argued social and intellectual history of the middle classes in Colombia makes a compelling case for the importance of both transnationalism and gender in the mid-century idea of middle-class-ness. A. Ricardo López-Pedreros’ Makers of…
Sarah Seo, “Policing the Open Road: How Cars Transformed American Freedom” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Aug 1, 2019 • 35 min
How the rise of the car, the symbol of American personal freedom, inadvertently led to ever more intrusive policing-with disastrous consequences for racial equality in our criminal justice system. When Americans think of freedom, they often picture the…
Ryan A. Quintana, “Making a Slave State: Political Development in Early South Carolina” (UNC Press, 2018)
Aug 1, 2019 • 51 min
Ryan A. Quintana is the author of Making a Slave State: Political Development in Early South Carolina, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2018. Making a Slave State examined how enslaved African Americans built the state of South…
Jeff Sahadeo, “Voices from the Soviet Edge: Southern Migrants in Leningrad and Moscow” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jul 31, 2019 • 54 min
In his new book, Voices from the Soviet Edge: Southern Migrants in Leningrad and Moscow (Cornell University Press, 2019), Jeff Sahadeo looks at the migrant experiences of peoples from the Caucuses and Central Asia in the late Soviet and early Post-Soviet…
Violet Moller, “The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found” (Doubleday, 2019)
Jul 31, 2019 • 64 min
Violet Moller has written a narrative history of the transmission of books from the ancient world to the modern. In The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found (Doubleday, 2019), Moller traces the histories of…
Amy Collier Artman, “The Miracle Lady: Kathryn Kuhlman and the Transformation of Charismatic Christianity” (Eerdmans, 2019)
Jul 31, 2019 • 60 min
On October 15, 1974, Johnny Carson welcomed his next guest on The Tonight Show with these words: “I imagine there are very few people who are not aware of Kathryn Kuhlman. She probably, along with Billy Graham, is one of the best-known ministers or…
Peter Jan Margry, “The Miracle of Amsterdam: Biography of a Contested Devotion” (U Notre Dame, 2019)
Jul 31, 2019 • 66 min
harles Caspers and Peter Jan Margry’s The Miracle of Amsterdam: Biography of a Contested Devotion (University of Notre Dame, 2019) presents a “cultural biography” of a Dutch devotional manifestation. According to tradition, on the night of March 15, 1345,…
Katharina Karcher, “Sisters in Arms: Militant Feminisms in the Federal Republic of Germany since 1968” (Berghahn, 2017)
Jul 31, 2019 • 55 min
In her new book, Sisters in Arms: Militant Feminisms in the Federal Republic of Germany since 1968 (Berghahn, 2017), Katharina Karcher Lecturer in German at the University of Birmingham, examines a critical time in the history and development of the…
Cynthia Nicoletti, “Trial: The Treason Prosecution of Jefferson Davis” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Jul 31, 2019 • 54 min
Cynthia Nicoletti is the author of Secession on Trial: The Treason Prosecution of Jefferson Davis, published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. Secession on Trial examines the post-Civil War United States as its people attempted to navigate a world…
Howard Philips Smith, “Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans” (UP of Mississippi, 2017)
Jul 30, 2019 • 63 min
Howard Philips Smith has been investigating and writing about the gay history of New Orleans for over two decades. Raised on a small farm in rural Southern Mississippi, he studied French literature and taught English in a French lycée in Bordeaux thanks…
Okezi Otovo, “Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Public Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945” (U Texas Press, 2016)
Jul 30, 2019 • 73 min
Okezi Otovo’s Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Public Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945 (U Texas Press, 2016) explores the intersecting histories of race, gender, and class in modern Brazil. Between 1850 and 1945, the period covered in…
Jessica Lowe, “Murder in the Shenandoah: Making Law Sovereign in Revolutionary Virginia” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 29, 2019 • 51 min
Jessica Lowe is the author of Murder in the Shenandoah: Making Law Sovereign in Revolutionary Virginia published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. Murder in the Shenandoah follows the criminal case against John Crane, a member of a prominent…
David Stenner, “Globalizing Morocco: Transnational Activism and the Postcolonial State” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jul 29, 2019 • 54 min
The story of Morocco’s independence struggle against France and Spain is a complicated one. Because it occurred around the same time of the long-running war for independence in Algeria, it has received greater scholarly attention. Moreover, Morocco’s…
Monica Muñoz Martinez, “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Jul 29, 2019 • 70 min
On January 28, 1918, just outside of town of Porvenir, Texas, US Army servicemen, Texas Rangers, and civilians murdered 15 unarmed Mexican men and boys. This massacre was not an aberration, writes Monica Muñoz Martinez, the Stanley J. Bernstein Assistant…
Roy Hay, “Aboriginal People and Australian Football in the 19th Century” (Cambridge Scholars, 2019)
Jul 29, 2019 • 67 min
Today we are joined by Roy Hay, Honorary Fellow at Deakin University, and the author of Aboriginal People and Australian Football in the 19th Century: They Did Not Come From Nowhere (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2019). In our conversation, we discussed…
Gabriela González, “Redeeming La Raza: Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability and Rights” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jul 29, 2019 • 66 min
Tiffany Jasmin González speaks with Dr. Gabriela González about her award-winning book, Redeeming La Raza: Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability and Rights (Oxford University Press, 2018) to talk about the strategies transborder activists used to…
Elizabeth R. Baer, “The Genocidal Gaze: From German Southwest Africa to the Third Reich” (Wayne State UP, 2017)
Jul 26, 2019 • 81 min
In her new book, The Genocidal Gaze: From German Southwest Africa to the Third Reich (Wayne State University Press, 2017), Elizabeth R. Baer, professor of English at Gustavus Adolphus College examines the threads of shared ideology in the Herero and Nama…
Vanessa Heggie, “Higher and Colder: A History of Extreme Physiology and Exploration” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jul 26, 2019 • 37 min
Vanessa Heggie talks about the history of biomedical research in extreme environments. Heggie is a Fellow of the Institute for Global Innovation at the University of Birmingham. She is the author of Higher and Colder: A History of Extreme Physiology and…
Emrah Şahin, “Faithful Encounters: Authorities and American Missionaries in the Ottoman Empire” (McGill-Queens UP, 2018)
Jul 25, 2019 • 70 min
The past decade has seen a tremendous production of scholarship on American missionary endeavors in the Middle East. In Faithful Encounters: Authorities and American Missionaries in the Ottoman Empire (McGill-Queens University Press, 2018), Emrah Şahin…
Christina Thompson, “Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia” (Harper, 2019)
Jul 25, 2019 • 57 min
It’s rare for a book of non-fiction to catch the interest of the reading public in the United States, much less a book on the history of science in the Pacific. But Christina Thompson’s Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia(Harper, 2019) has managed to do…
Ashley Robertson, “Mary McLeod Bethune in Florida: Bringing Social Justice to the Sunshine State” (The History Press, 2015)
Jul 25, 2019 • 40 min
Mary McLeod Bethune was often called the “First Lady of Negro America,” but she made significant contributions to the political climate of Florida as well. From the founding of the Daytona Literary and Industrial School for Training Negro Girls in 1904,…
Christy Clark-Pujara, “Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island” (NYU Press, 2016)
Jul 25, 2019 • 47 min
In Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island(NYU Press, 2016; paperback, 2018), Christy Clark-Pujara, Associate Professor of History in the Department of Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, tells the story of one state…
Sam Erman, “Almost Citizens: Puerto Rico, the U.S. Constitution, and Empire” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Jul 25, 2019 • 56 min
Sam Erman is the author of Almost Citizens: Puerto Rico, the U.S. Constitution, and Empire, published by Cambridge University Press in 2018. Almost Citizens recounts the story of how Puerto Rico came to be part of the United States empire at the turn of…
Casey Lurtz, “From the Grounds Up: Building an Export Economy in Southern Mexico” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jul 25, 2019 • 60 min
In From the Grounds Up: Building an Export Economy in Southern Mexico (Stanford University Press, 2019), Casey Lurtz explains how the fertile yet isolated region of the Soconusco became integrated into global markets in the late nineteenth- and early…
Vicki Howard, “From Main Street to Mall: The Rise and Fall of the American Department Store” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2015)
Jul 24, 2019 • 44 min
This week we take a break from fun and games to talk about business and consumerism–which, to be sure, is for some people also fun and games. As Vicki Howard reminds us in her new book, From Main Street to Mall: The Rise and Fall of the American…
Andrew Torget, “Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850” (UNC Press, 2015)
Jul 24, 2019 • 53 min
The secession of Texas from Mexico was a dry run for the slaveholder’s republic of the Confederate States of America, argues Andrew Torget in Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850(University of North…
Reinhart Kössler, “Namibia and Germany: Negotiating the Past” (U Namibia Press, 2015)
Jul 24, 2019 • 60 min
Today’s Namibia was once the German colony of South West Africa, for a 30-year period spanning of 1884 to 1915. From 1904-1908, German colonial troops committed the first genocide of the 20th century against the Herero and Nama people, many of whom…
Courtney Pace, “Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Jul 24, 2019 • 56 min
Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall (University of Georgia Press, 2019) is the first full-length critical study of Rev. Dr. Prathia Laura Ann Hall (1940–2002), an undersung leader in both the civil rights movement and African American…
William F. Trimble, “John S. McCain and the Triumph of Naval Air Power” (Naval Institute Press, 2019)
Jul 24, 2019 • 76 min
The carrier task force—the symbolic and physical manifestation of the United States’ ability to project naval and air power across the globe—came of age during the Second World War. Fighting the Imperial Japanese Navy, and closely supporting General…
Jamie Aroosi, “The Dialectical Self: Kierkegaard, Marx, and the Making of the Modern Subject” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
Jul 24, 2019 • 41 min
Jamie Aroosi has written an important book that brings together the theoretical work of Karl Marx and Soren Kierkegaard in a kind of intellectual encounter. Noting the common historical context for both authors, and how they both came to their…
David Slucki, “My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons” (Wayne State UP, 2019)
Jul 23, 2019 • 37 min
In Sing This at My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons (Wayne State University Press, 2019), David Slucki, Assistant Professor in the Yaschik/Arnold Jewish Studies Program at the College of Charleston, gives us a very different type of history book.…
Ricardo Cubas Ramacciotti, “The Politics of Religion and the Rise of Social Catholicism in Peru (1884-1935)” (Brill, 2018)
Jul 23, 2019 • 58 min
In The Politics of Religion and the Rise of Social Catholicism in Peru (1884-1935): Faith, Workers, and Race Before Liberation Theology (Brill, 2018), Ricardo Cubas Ramacciotti, Associate Professor of Latin American History at the Universidad de los Andes…
Anne Twitty, “Before Dred Scott: Slavery and Legal Culture in the American Confluence, 1787-1857” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Jul 23, 2019 • 59 min
Anne Twitty is the author of Before Dred Scott: Slavery and Legal Culture in the American Confluence, 1787-1857, published by Cambridge University Press in 2016. Before Dred Scott looks at numerous freedom suits filed in the St. Louis circuit court in…
Tyrell Haberkorn, “In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand” (U Wisconsin Press, 2018)
Jul 23, 2019 • 44 min
In the preface to In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand (University of Wisconsin Press, 2018) Tyrell Haberkorn asks, echoing Pakavadi Veerapaspong, if and when it might one day be possible to write a book on “memories of dictatorship” in…
Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, “Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 22, 2019 • 44 min
How are markets made? In Automating Finance: Infrastructures, Engineers, and the Making of Electronic Markets (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, an assistant professor in sociology at the University of California, San Diego,…
Rachel B. Herrmann, “No Useless Mouth: Waging War and Fighting Hunger in the American Revolution” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jul 22, 2019 • 43 min
When the British explored the Atlantic coast of America in the 1580s, their relations with indigenous peoples were structured by food. The newcomers, unable to sustain themselves through agriculture, relied on the local Algonquian people for resources.…
Tricia Starks, “Smoking Under the Tsars: A History of Tobacco in Imperial Russia” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Jul 22, 2019 • 59 min
How and when did Russia become a country of smokers? Why did makhorka and papirosy become ubiquitous products of tobacco consumption? Tricia Starks explores these themes as well as the connections between tobacco, gender, and empire in her latest…
Tita Chico, “The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Jul 22, 2019 • 68 min
Can science be seductive? According to Tita Chico, the answer is a resounding yes. In her new book, The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment(Stanford University Press, 2018), Dr. Chico’s new book upends the…
James W. Pardew, “Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans” (U Kentucky Press, 2017)
Jul 19, 2019 • 44 min
In his book Peacemakers: American Leadership and the End of Genocide in the Balkans (University of Kentucky Press, 2017), Ambassador James W. Pardew describes the role of the U.S. involvement in ending the wars and genocide in the Balkans. As a…
Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi, “This Is Really War: The Incredible True Story of a Navy Nurse POW in the Occupied Philippines” (Chicago Review Press, 2019)
Jul 19, 2019 • 65 min
In her new book, This Is Really War: The Incredible True Story of a Navy Nurse POW in the Occupied Philippines (Chicago Review Press, 2019), Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi presents the largely unknown story of the US Navy nurses captured by the Japanese in the…
Thomas A. Foster, “Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men” (U Georgia Press, 2019)
Jul 19, 2019 • 42 min
Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men (University of Georgia Press, 2019) is the first book-length study of sexual violence against enslaved men. Scholars have extensively documented the widespread sexual exploitation and abuse suffered by…
John D. Hawks, “Almost Human: The Astonishing Tale of Homo naledi and the Discovery That Changed Our Human Story” (National Geographic, 2017)
Jul 19, 2019 • 33 min
John D. Hawks talks about new developments in paleoanthropology – the discovery of a new hominid species Homo Naledi in South Africa, the Neanderthal ancestry of many human populations, and the challenge of rethinking anthropological science’s…
E. Danto and A. Steiner-Strauss, “Freud/Tiffany: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham and the Best Possible School” (Routledge, 2018)
Jul 19, 2019 • 61 min
Elizabeth Danto and Alexandra Steiner-Strauss’ edited book, Freud/Tiffany: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham and The Best Possible School (Routledge, 2018), stands to alter what has become practically an idee fixe about Anna Freud. Whereas she can…
Gregory Borchard, “A Narrative History of the American Press” (Routledge, 2018)
Jul 18, 2019 • 53 min
The American press is older than the United States itself. Ever since its catalytic role in the American Revolution, journalism has evolved to meet changing political, economic, and technological demands. Gregory Borchard traces this history in A…
Danny Orbach, “Curse on This Country: The Rebellious Army of Imperial Japan” (Cornell UP, 2017)
Jul 18, 2019 • 55 min
Danny Orbach’s Curse on This Country: The Rebellious Army of Imperial Japan (Cornell University Press, 2017) provides new insights into the origins of the insubordination that plagued and characterized the Imperial Japanese Army in the 1930s. Orbach…
Kimberly Welch, “Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South” (UNC Press, 2018)
Jul 18, 2019 • 48 min
Kimberly Welch is the author of Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2018). Welch is Assistant Professor of History and Assistant Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University. Her book explores the history of…
Betsy Perabo, “Russian Orthodoxy and the Russo-Japanese War” (Bloomsbury, 2017)
Jul 18, 2019 • 49 min
As Russian militarism becomes increasingly intertwined with Russian Orthodoxy theology in the 21st century, the history of the Church’s relationship to war and its justification becomes particularly relevant. Betsy Perabo’s book Russian Orthodoxy and the…
Benjamin Meiches, “The Politics of Annihilation: A Genealogy of Genocide” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
Jul 17, 2019 • 57 min
In The Politics of Annihilation: A Genealogy of Genocide (University of Minnesota Press, 2019),Benjamin Meiches takes a novel approach to the study of genocide by analyzing the ways in which ideas, concepts, and understandings about what genocide is and…
Melissa McCormick, “The Tale of Genji: A Visual Companion” (Princeton UP, 2018)
Jul 17, 2019 • 56 min
The Genji Album (1510) in the Harvard Art Museums is the oldest dated set of Genji illustrations known to exist. In The Tale of Genji. A Visual Companion, published by Princeton University Press in 2018, Melissa McCormick discusses all of the fifty-four…
Maria Cotera, “Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era” (U of Texas Press, 2018)
Jul 17, 2019 • 59 min
In Chicana Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era(University of Texas Press, 2018), Dionne Espinoza, María Eugenia Cotera, and Maylei Blackwell have formulated a landmark anthology illustrating Chicana feminism and activism…
Brian Haara, “Bourbon Justice: How Whiskey Law Shaped America” (Potomac Books, 2015)
Jul 17, 2019 • 63 min
Bourbon whiskey has been around since nearly the beginning of the United States. Given that longevity, it has been part of the corporate law of the United States since the beginning of the corporate law of the United States. My guest today Brian Haara…
Ann Powers, “Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music” (Dey St. Books, 2017)
Jul 17, 2019 • 63 min
In Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music (Dey St. Books, HarperCollins, 2017), Ann Powers explores the rich and, at times, unexpected intersections of love, sex, race, gender, sexuality, and American popular music.…
Elaine Hampton and Cynthia Ontiveros, ”Copper Stain: ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
Jul 17, 2019 • 39 min
In Copper Stain: ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Elaine Hampton and Cynthia Ontiveros tell the story of how a Mexican American community in El Paso have fought back against environmental injustice. The physical and social…
Laura Alice Watt, “The Paradox of Preservation: Wilderness and Working Landscapes at Point Reyes National Seashore” (U California Press, 2016)
Jul 16, 2019 • 77 min
“Wilderness,” “nature,” and their “preservation” are concepts basic to how the National Park Service organizes our relationship to American land. They are also contested concepts, geographer and environmental historian Laura Alice Watt shows in The…
Nancy S. Steinhardt, “Chinese Architecture: A History” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jul 16, 2019 • 65 min
If there’s one thing that conjures up the – rightly contested – idea of a ‘civilisation’, it is grand palatial or religious buildings, and many such structures are foremost in how China is imagined throughout the world. But as Nancy S. Steinhardt notes in…
Marko Geslani, “Rites of the God-King: Śānti and Ritual Change in Early Hinduism” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jul 16, 2019 • 59 min
Is “Vedic” fire sacrifice at odds with “Hindu” image worship? Through a careful study of ritual (śanti) texts geared towards appeasement of inauspicious forces (primarily the Atharva Veda and in the Bṛhatsaṃhitā, an Indian astrological work), Marko…
Catherine Keyser, “Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 15, 2019 • 74 min
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Catherine Keyser about early twentieth century fiction and the role that modern food plays in literature as a language for talking about race and racial categories. In Artificial Color: Modern Food and…
Hannah Weiss Muller, “Subjects and Sovereign: Bonds of Belonging in the Eighteenth-Century British Empire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Jul 15, 2019 • 41 min
There is no denying that the public remains fascinated with monarchy. In the United Kingdom, the royal family commands the headlines, but paradoxically they are distant and knowable all at once. The Queen is an iconic yet reserved figure, what with the…
Shirletta J. Kinchen, “Black Power in the Bluff City: African American Youth and Student Activism in Memphis, 1965–1975” (U Tennessee Press, 2016)
Jul 15, 2019 • 63 min
During the civil rights era, Memphis gained a reputation for having one of the South’s strongest NAACP branches. But that organization, led by the city’s black elite, was hardly the only driving force in the local struggle against racial injustice. In the…
Katie Batza, “Before AIDS: Gay Health Politics in the 1970s” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)
Jul 15, 2019 • 33 min
The AIDS crisis of the 1980s looms large in recent histories of sexuality, medicine, and politics, and justly so—an unknown virus without a cure ravages an already persecuted minority, medical professionals are unprepared and sometimes unwilling to care…
David Varel, “The Lost Black Scholar: Resurrecting Allison Davis in American Social Thought” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Jul 12, 2019 • 66 min
Allison Davis (1902-1983) was a pioneering anthropologist who did ground-breaking fieldwork in the Jim Crow south, challenged the racial bias of IQ tests, and became the first African American to be tenured at the University of Chicago. And yet despite…
Marc Stein, “Sexual Injustice: Supreme Court Decisions from Griswold to Roe” (UNC Press, 2013)
Jul 12, 2019 • 37 min
Focusing on six major Supreme Court cases during the 1960s and 1970s, Marc Stein’s book Sexual Injustice (University of North Carolina Press, 2013) examines the generally liberal rulings on birth control, abortion, interracial marriage, and obscenity in…
Jeremy Friedman, “Shadow Cold War: The Sino-Soviet Competition for the Third World” (UNC Press, 2018)
Jul 12, 2019 • 64 min
If today’s geopolitical fragmentation and the complexities of a ‘multipolar’ world order have led some to reminisce about the apparent stability of the Cold War era’s two ‘camps’, it should be remembered that things were of course never so…
Alexandra Popoff, “Vasily Grossman and the Soviet Century” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jul 12, 2019 • 65 min
Memory and truth are malleable and nowhere more so than in the Soviet Union. To be a writer in that country was to face an ongoing dilemma: conform to State-mandated topics and themes, or consign oneself to obscurity, writing only for “the desk drawer” or…
Donald Reid, “Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981” (Verso Books, 2018)
Jul 11, 2019 • 61 min
In the summer of 1973, Donald Reid was an undergraduate student who had traveled to France for the first time to work on his Honors thesis in History. It was the “summer of Lip”. Don’s new book, Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981 (Verso Books,…
Seán Moore, “Slavery and the Making of Early American Libraries” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 11, 2019 • 62 min
Early American libraries stood at the nexus of two transatlantic branches of commerce—the book trade and the slave trade. Slavery and the Making of Early American Libraries: British Literature, Political Thought, and the Transatlantic Book Trade,…
Jakobina Arch, “Bringing Whales Ashore: Oceans and the Environment of Early Modern Japan” (U Washington Press, 2018)
Jul 11, 2019 • 57 min
Bringing Whales Ashore: Oceans and the Environment of Early Modern Japan (University of Washington Press, 2018) is more than a history of whaling in Japan. Jakobina K. Arch weaves together a wealth of diverse materials to demonstrate and explore the…
Douglas Sheflin, “Legacies of Dust: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Jul 10, 2019 • 52 min
The “Dust Bowl” remains a mainstay in American history textbooks. When dust storms swept over the southern plains in the 1930s, they upended farming communities and left thousands of migrants in search of brighter horizons in the “Dirty Thirties.” The…
Jonathan Gienapp, “The Second Creation: Fixing the American Constitution in the Founding Era” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Jul 10, 2019 • 62 min
In his book, The Second Creation: Fixing the American Constitution in the Founding Era (Harvard University Press, 2018), Jonathan Gienapp revisits the Founding Era to retell the story of America’s favorite document. Looking at the Constitution’s creation,…
Sarah Anne Carter, “Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jul 10, 2019 • 62 min
The metaphor “object lesson” is a familiar one, still in everyday use. But what exactly does the metaphor refer to? In her book Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World (Oxford University Press, 2018),…
Robert Louis Wilken, “Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian Origins of Religious Freedom” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jul 10, 2019 • 62 min
Robert Louis Wilken, the William R. Kenan Professor Emeritus of the History of Christianity at the University of Virginia, has written an intellectual history of the ideas surrounding freedom of religion. Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian…
Lina del Castillo, “Crafting a Republic for the World: Scientific, Geographic and Historiographic Inventions of Colombia” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Jul 9, 2019 • 65 min
Lina del Castillo’s book explores scientific, geographic, and historiographic inventions in nineteenth-century Colombia. In this fascinating book, well-known figures of Colombia’s history (such as Francisco José de Caldas, and José María Samper) are cast…
Lynn Downey, “Levi Strauss: The Man Who Gave Blue Jeans to the World” (U Massachusetts Press, 2016)
Jul 9, 2019 • 53 min
Nearly every consumer today is familiar with the name Levi Strauss thank to the jeans that bear his name. As Lynn Downey explains in her book Levi Strauss: The Man Who Gave Blue Jeans to the World (University of Massachusetts Press, 2016), to understand…
Sergei Zhuk, “Soviet Americana: The Cultural History of Russian and Ukrainian Americanists” (I.B. Tauris, 2018)
Jul 9, 2019 • 80 min
Sergei Zhuk’s Soviet Americana: The Cultural History of Russian and Ukrainian Americanists (Tauris, 2018) offers an insightful investigation of the development of American studies in the Soviet Union, with a specific emphasis on Soviet Russia and Soviet…
Richard Foltz, “History of the Tajiks: Iranians of the East” (I.B. Tauris, 2019)
Jul 9, 2019 • 69 min
In History of the Tajiks: Iranians of the East(I.B. Tauris, 2019), Richard Foltz provides a comprehensive cultural, political, and linguistic history of the Tajik people. Throughout the book, he traces the history of this Persian-speaking Iranian ethnic…
Pankaj Sekhsaria, “Islands in Flux: The Andaman and Nicobar Story” (HarperCollins India, 2017)
Jul 9, 2019 • 59 min
One of the most consistent chronicler of contemporary issues in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Pankaj Sekhsaria’s writings on the environment, wildlife conservation, development and indigenous communities have provided insights and perspective on the…
Melvin C. Johnson, “Life and Times of John Pierce Hawley: A Mormon Ulysses of the American West” (Greg Kofford Books, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 79 min
Life and Times of John Pierce Hawley: A Mormon Ulysses of the American West (Greg Kofford Books, 2019) narrates the wide-ranging life of John Hawley’s search for an authentic Mormon faith. Melvin C. Johnson has been researching Hawley’s adventurous life…
Laura Robson and Arie Dubnov, “Partitions: A Transnational History of Twentieth-Century Territorial Separatism” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 49 min
The practice of Partition understood as the physical division of territory along ethno-religious lines into separate nation-states is often regarded as a successful political “solution” to ethnic conflict. In their edited volume Partitions: A…
Donald Stoker, “Why America Loses Wars: Limited War and US Strategy from the Korean War to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 45 min
In this provocative challenge to United States policy and strategy, former Professor of Strategy & Policy at the US Naval War College, and author or editor of eleven books, Dr. Donald Stoker argues that America endures endless wars because its leaders no…
Emily S. Johnson, “This Is Our Message: Women’s Leadership in the New Christian Right” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 50 min
Over the past 50 years, the architects of the religious right have become household names: Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, James Dobson. They have used their massively influential platforms to build the profiles of evangelical politicians like Mike…
M. L. Mitma and J. P. Heilman, “Now Peru is Mine: The Life and Times of a Campesino Activist” (Duke UP, 2016)
Jul 8, 2019 • 51 min
Now Peru is Mine: The Life and Times of a Campesino Activist (Duke University Press, 2016), tells the remarkable story of a campesino and indigenous political activist whose career spanned much of Peru’s twentieth century and whose achievements at the…
Genevieve Carpio, “Collisions at the Crossroads: How Place and Mobility Make Race” (U California Press, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 71 min
In her new book, Collisions at the Crossroads: How Place and Mobility Make Race (University of California Press, 2019), Professor Genevieve Carpio considers tensions around mobility and settlement in the 19th- and 20th-century American West, especially…
Caroline Boggis-Rolfe, “The Baltic Story: A Thousand Year History of Its Lands, Sea, and Peoples” (Amberley, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 54 min
The story of the littoral nations of the Baltic Sea is like a saga, that genre perfected by those tenacious inhabitants of the rocky shores of this ancient trading corridor. In it, we meet pirates, princes, and prelates; and while much divides the Slavs,…
Lorenzo Andolfatto, “Hundred Days’ Literature: Chinese Utopian Fiction at the End of Empire, 1902–1910” (Brill, 2019)
Jul 8, 2019 • 66 min
In Hundred Days’ Literature, Chinese Utopian Fiction at the End of Empire, 1902–1910 (Brill, 2019), Lorenzo Andolfatto explores the landscape of early modern Chinese fiction through the lens of the utopian novel, casting new light on some of its most…
Tiffany Gill, “To Turn the Whole World Over: Black Women and Internationalism” (U Illinois Press, 2019)
Jul 5, 2019 • 40 min
Annette Joseph-Gabriel talks with Tiffany Gill about the history of African American travel in the late twentieth century and its significance to Black communities across the lines of class and gender. Joseph-Gabriel is an assistant professor of French at…
Yuko Miki, “Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Jul 5, 2019 • 67 min
Yuko Miki’s book, Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil(Cambridge University Press, 2018), was the recent recipient of LASA’s 19th-century section Honorable Mention for Best Book. Frontiers of Citizenship is a…
Petra Goedde, “The Politics of Peace: A Global Cold War History” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jul 5, 2019 • 54 min
Earlier histories of the Cold War haven’t exactly been charitable toward the peace activists and pacifists who led peace initiatives. Pacifists in the United States were either simplistic and naïve, or they were fellow travelers of the Soviet Union. Peace…
Bennett Gilbert, “A Personalist Philosophy of History” (Routledge, 2019)
Jul 5, 2019 • 62 min
In his book, A Personalist Philosophy of History (Routledge, 2019), Bennett Gilbert identifies our affection of and affliction by history. As he argues, we are connected by moral responsibility to the past in a way that elicits both our attention and our…
Ashley Thompson, “Engendering the Buddhist State: Territory, Sovereignty and Sexual Difference in the Inventions of Angkor” (Routledge, 2016)
Jul 4, 2019 • 40 min
Thanks to the international tourism industry most people are familiar with the spectacular ruins of Angkor, the great Cambodian empire that lasted from about the 9th to the early 15th century. We are especially familiar with those haunting images of the…
Richard Vague, “A Brief History of Doom: Two Hundred Years of Financial Crises” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
Jul 4, 2019 • 37 min
Richard Vague really really cares about private-sector debt. And he thinks you should too. In A Brief History of Doom: Two Hundred Years of Financial Crises (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), Vague sees the rise and fall of private sector debt as…
Greta LaFleur, “The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Jul 4, 2019 • 80 min
In The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018), Greta LaFleur invites readers to consider a different body. The book effectively historicizes categories that are often take for granted (sex, race, vice, habit),…
Robin Scheffler, “A Contagious Cause: The American Hunt for Cancer Viruses and the Rise of Molecular Medicine” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jul 4, 2019 • 40 min
Could cancer be a contagious disease? Although this possibility might seem surprising to many of us, it has a long history. In fact, efforts to develop a cancer vaccine drew more money than the Human Genome Project. In his first book, MIT historian of…
William Caferro, “Petrarch’s War: Florence and the Black Death in Context” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Jul 3, 2019 • 59 min
In 1349 the City-Republic of Florence had just endured a horrific epidemic of bubonic plague, that contagion that became known as the Black Death. Nevertheless, despite the effects upon both their population and treasury, they marshaled their resources to…
Anna Rose Alexander, “City on Fire: Technology, Social Change, and the Hazards of Progress in Mexico City, 1860-1910” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2016)
Jul 3, 2019 • 40 min
Dr. Anna Rose Alexander’s City on Fire: Technology, Social Change, and the Hazards of Progress in Mexico City, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016) looks at fire as an active agent of change in the urban environment (a catalyst for change).…
Stephen Hardy and Andrew Holman, “Hockey: A Global History” (U Illinois Press, 2018)
Jul 3, 2019 • 71 min
Today we are joined by Stephen Hardy, retired professor of kinesiology and affiliate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, and Andrew Holman, professor of history at and the director of Canadian studies at Bridgewater State University.…
Tiffany Florvil and Vanessa Plumly, “Rethinking Black German Studies: Approaches, Interventions, and Histories” (Peter Lang, 2018)
Jul 3, 2019 • 69 min
Black German Studies is an interdisciplinary field that has experienced significant growth over the past three decades, integrating subjects such as gender studies, diaspora studies, history, and media and performance studies. The field’s contextual roots…
Paul J. Croce, “Young William James Thinking” (John Hopkins UP, 2018)
Jul 2, 2019 • 64 min
Paul J. Croce, professor of history at Stetson University. Young William James Thinking (John Hopkins University Press, 2018) offers a developmental biography of the famous pragmatist. James’s mature thinking as a radical empiricist was formed through his…
Darren Dochuk, “Anointed with Oil: How Christianity and Crude Made Modern America” (Basic Books, 2019)
Jul 2, 2019 • 51 min
Anointed with Oil: How Christianity and Crude Made Modern America (Basic Books, 2019) places religion and oil at the center of American history. As prize-winning historian Darren Dochuk reveals, from the earliest discovery of oil in America during the…
Yuen Yuen Ang, “How China Escaped the Poverty Trap” (Cornell UP, 2016)
Jul 2, 2019 • 41 min
I spoke with Dr Yuen Yuen Ang, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She published in 2016 a great new book How China Escaped the Poverty Trap (Cornell University Press, 2016). This is a very original and…
Joan Wallach Scott, “Sex and Secularism” (Princeton UP, 2017)
Jul 2, 2019 • 59 min
Joan Wallach Scott’s contributions to the history of women and gender, and to feminist theory, will be familiar to listeners across multiple disciplines. Her latest book, Sex and Secularism (Princeton University Press, 2017) is a compelling analysis of…
Kirsten Fermaglich, “A Rosenberg by Any Other Name: A History of Jewish Name Changing in America” (NYU Press, 2018)
Jul 1, 2019 • 59 min
Throughout the 20th century, especially during and immediately after WWII, New York Jews changed their names at rates considerably higher than any other ethnic group. Representative of the insidious nature of American anti-Semitism, recognizably Jewish…
Erik Sjöberg, “The Making of the Greek Genocide: Contested Memories of the Ottoman Greek Catastrophe” (Berghahn Books, 2018)
Jul 1, 2019 • 74 min
Most of the time, memory studies focuses on well-known case studies. The result Is that we know lots about commemoration and memory regarding the Holocaust, about slavery, about apartheid, and other cases, but much less about how memory works in smaller…
Sasha D. Pack, “The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jul 1, 2019 • 59 min
In his new book, The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border(Stanford, 2019), Sasha D. Pack considers the Strait of Gibraltar as an untamed in-between space—from “shatter zone” to borderland. Far from the…
Laura R. Barraclough, “Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity” (U California Press, 2019)
Jul 1, 2019 • 70 min
In Charros: How Mexican Cowboys Are Remapping Race and American Identity (University of California Press, 2019), Dr. Laura R. Barraclough tells a surprising story about the urban American West. Barraclough, the Sarai Ribicoff Associate Professor in…
Sarah Eppler Janda, “Prairie Power: Student Activism, Counterculture, and Backlash in Oklahoma, 1962–1972” (U Oklahoma Press, 2018)
Jun 28, 2019 • 51 min
The sixties happened in Oklahoma too, argued Sarah Eppler Janda in Prairie Power: Student Activism, Counterculture, and Backlash in Oklahoma, 1962–1972(University of Oklahoma Press, 2018). While not a hub of activism and student protest on the scale of…
Jeremy F. Walton, “Muslim Civil Society and the Politics of Religious Freedom in Turkey” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Jun 28, 2019 • 66 min
The social history of Turkey across the twentieth century has produced a tension between state governance and religion. This history informs and shapes modern subjects as they try to live out an authentic vision of the present. In Muslim Civil Society and…
Philip W. Clements, “Science in an Extreme Environment: The American Mount Everest Expedition” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2018)
Jun 28, 2019 • 33 min
Historian of Science Philip W. Clements discusses the 1963 American Mount Everest Expedition. His book, Science in an Extreme Environment: The American Mount Everest Expedition, is now out with University of Pittsburgh Press (2018). Part I, originally…
Daniel Nemser, “Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico” (U Texas Press, 2017)
Jun 28, 2019 • 63 min
Daniel Nemser’s Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico(University of Texas Press, 2017) examines the long history of how Spanish imperial rule depended upon spatial concentration – the gathering of people and things into…
Jonathan D. T. Ward, “China’s Vision of Victory” (Atlas Publishing, 2019)
Jun 28, 2019 • 52 min
Someday we may say that we never saw it coming. After seventy-five years of peace in the Pacific, a new challenger to American power has emerged, on a scale not seen since the Soviet Union at its height. With a deep if partially contrived sense of…
Nancy Mirabal, “Suspect Freedoms: The Racial and Sexual Politics of Cubanidad in New York, 1823-1957” (NYU Press, 2017)
Jun 27, 2019 • 51 min
In Suspect Freedoms: The Racial and Sexual Politics of Cubanidad in New York, 1823-1957 (NYU Press, 2017), Nancy Mirabal details New York Cuban diasporic history between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with keen attention to how political debates…
Kristen Ghodsee, “Red Hangover: Legacies of Twentieth-Century Communism” (Duke UP, 2017)
Jun 27, 2019 • 75 min
I am a child of the so-called transition in Bulgaria and growing-up I could never understand why my parents and grandparents would spend our family gatherings talking about the socialist past. It wasn’t until much later that I realized how much socialism…
P. L. Caballero and A. Acevedo-Rodrigo, “Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico” (U Arizona Press, 2018)
Jun 27, 2019 • 83 min
What happens when scholars approach the category of “indigenous” without presupposing its otherness? Edited by Paula López Caballero and Ariadna Acevedo-Rodrigo, Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico (University of Arizona Press,…
Gregory D. Smithers, “Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
Jun 27, 2019 • 66 min
In his book, Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal(University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Dr. Gregory D. Smithers effectively articulates the complex history of Native Southerners. Smithers conveys the history of Native Southerners…
Tobias Straumann, “1931: Debt, Crisis, and the Rise of Hitler” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jun 27, 2019 • 62 min
What can we learn from the financial crisis that brought Hitler to power? How did diplomatic deadlock fuel the rise of authoritarianism? Tobias Straumann shares vital insights with 1931: Debt, Crisis, and the Rise of Hitler (Oxford University Press,…
Tim Bouverie, “Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War” (Tim Duggan Books, 2019)
Jun 27, 2019 • 39 min
Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War(Tim Duggan Books, 2019) is a groundbreaking history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that help to make Hitler’s domination of Europe…
Kimberly Alexander, “Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Jun 26, 2019 • 64 min
“Fashion is universal,” writes my guest Kimberly Alexander in her book Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018), “enabling historians across time, place, and culture to form an understanding of the people who made…
Amanda Littauer, “Bad Girls: Young Women, Sex, and Rebellion before the Sixties” (UNC Press, 2015)
Jun 26, 2019 • 78 min
In her innovative and revealing study of midcentury American sex and culture, Bad Girls: Young Women, Sex, and Rebellion before the Sixties (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), Amanda Littauer traces the origins of the “sexual revolution” of the…
Jeanette M. Fregulia, “A Rich and Tantalizing Brew: A History of How Coffee Connected the World” (U Arkansas Press, 2019))
Jun 26, 2019 • 47 min
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Jeanette M. Fregulia about the movements of coffee beans, coffee drinking, and coffee houses from Ethiopia and Yemen, across the Mediterranean region, through Western Europe, and to the Americas. In A Rich…
Candace L. Bailey, “Charleston Belles Abroad: The Music Collections of Harriet Lowndes, Henrietta Aiken, and Louisa Rebecca McCord” (U South Carolina Press, 2019)
Jun 26, 2019 • 56 min
Microhistories are an important method of investigating an historical moment with a fine-grain focus that can puncture holes in the generalizations that historians sometimes make. In her new book, Charleston Belles Abroad: The Music Collections of Harriet…
Botakoz Kassymbekova, “Despite Cultures: Early Soviet Rule in Tajikistan” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2016)
Jun 26, 2019 • 65 min
Botakoz Kassymbekova’s Despite Cultures: Early Soviet Rule in Tajikistan (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016) is a terrific study of early Soviet rule in Tajikistan based on extensive archival research. Her work explores technologies of governance used…
Hye-Kyung Lee, “Cultural Policy in South Korea: Making a New Patron State” (Routledge, 2018)
Jun 25, 2019 • 42 min
Why does Korean cultural policy matter? In Cultural Policy in South Korea: Making a New Patron State (Routledge, 2018), Hye-Kyung Lee, a Senior Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries at Kings College, London, demonstrates the importance of South…
Brenda Elsey and Joshua Nadel, “Futbolera: A History of Women and Sports in Latin America” (U Texas Press, 2019)
Jun 25, 2019 • 61 min
Brenda Elsey and Joshua Nadel’s new book, Futbolera: A History of Women and Sports in Latin America (University of Texas Press, 2019), uncovers the hidden history of the arrival of physical education for girls in the late-nineteenth century, it’s…
Amy Lippert, “Consuming Identities: Visual Culture in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jun 25, 2019 • 118 min
Along with the rapid expansion of the market economy and industrial production methods, such innovations as photography, lithography, and steam printing created a pictorial revolution in nineteenth-century society. The proliferation of visual prints,…
Gregory H. Wolf, “Wrigley Field: The Friendly Confines at Clark and Addison” (SABR, 2019)
Jun 25, 2019 • 72 min
Wrigley Field is one of a handful of sports stadiums to have transcended its athletic purpose to become a true American landmark. Nestled in its neighborhood on the north side of Chicago, the park may be a throwback to a bygone era of baseball, but a…
Matthew Edney, “Cartography: The Ideal and Its History” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Jun 25, 2019 • 59 min
Over the past four decades, the volumes published in the landmark History of Cartography series have both chronicled and encouraged scholarship about maps and mapping practices across time and space. As the current director of the project that has…
Nick Estes, “Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline” (Verso, 2019)
Jun 24, 2019 • 53 min
The historian Nick Estes traces two centuries of Indigenous-led resistance and anti-colonial struggle. Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019) moves from…
David Munns, “Engineering the Environment: Phytotrons and the Quest for Climate Control in the Cold War” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2017)
Jun 24, 2019 • 34 min
“Phytotron” is such a great name for something that is, when you look at it, a high-tech greenhouse. But don’t sell it short! The phytotron was not only at the center of post-war plant science, but also connected to the Cold War, commercial agriculture,…
Chris S. Duvall, “The African Roots of Marijuana” (Duke UP, 2019)
Jun 24, 2019 • 50 min
There’s so much discussion in the contemporary United States about marijuana. Debates focus on legalization and medicalization. Usually, Reefer Madness, Harry Anslinger, and race are brought into the conversation. But a big part of the larger marijuana…
Paul Ramírez, “Enlightened Immunity: Mexico’s Experiments with Disease Prevention in the Age of Reason” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Jun 24, 2019 • 57 min
Paul Ramírez’s first book explores how laypeople impacted the new medical techniques and technologies implemented by the imperial state in the final decades of Spanish rule in colonial Mexico. More than a scholarly intervention, Ramírez seeks to answer a…
Stephen R. Duncan, “The Rebel Café: Sex, Race, and Politics in Cold War America’s Nightclub Underground” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
Jun 24, 2019 • 46 min
The art and antics of rebellious figures in 1950s American nightlife―from the Beat Generation to eccentric jazz musicians and comedians―have long fascinated fans and scholars alike. In The Rebel Café: Sex, Race, and Politics in Cold War America’s…
Anthony J. Badger, “Albert Gore, Sr.: A Political Life” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
Jun 24, 2019 • 61 min
In 1956 Albert Gore, Sr. received national attention as one of only three senators from the states of the former Confederacy who refused to sign the infamous “Southern Manifesto” opposing the racial integration of public spaces. Lauded as Gore was by many…
Rebecca Janzen, “Liminal Sovereignty: Mennonites and Mormons in Mexican Culture” (SUNY Press, 2018)
Jun 21, 2019 • 54 min
Liminal Sovereignty: Mennonites and Mormons in Mexican Culture (SUNY Press, 2018) examines the lives of two religious minority communities in Mexico, Mennonites and Mormons, as seen through Mexican culture. Mennonites emigrated from Canada to Mexico from…
David Karol, “Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jun 21, 2019 • 34 min
David Karol’s new book, Red, Green, and Blue: The Partisan Divide on Environmental Issues (Cambridge University Press, 2019), examines the history of environmental policy within American political parties. He ably integrates the early conservation…
Edward Vallance, “Loyalty, Memory and Public Opinion in England, 1658-1727” (Manchester UP, 2019)
Jun 20, 2019 • 57 min
People value loyalty. We prize it in our dogs. We loyally carry loyalty cards to claim discounts at our favourite stores and coffee shops. We follow sports teams, even when they lose. Loyalty is also deeply political. It is signified in oaths of office,…
Heather Mayer, ”Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924” (Oregon State UP, 2018)
Jun 20, 2019 • 30 min
The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex,…
Kristen R. Ghodsee, “Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War” (Duke UP, 2019)
Jun 20, 2019 • 69 min
Last week, I had the privilege to talk with Dr. Kristen R. Ghodsee about her most recent book Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women’s Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War (Duke University Press, 2019) and the behind-the-scene details of…
Alexandra M. Nickliss, “Phoebe Apperson Hearst: A Life of Power and Politics” (Bison Books, 2018)
Jun 19, 2019 • 52 min
Though not as well known today as her husband George or her son William Randolph, Phoebe Apperson Hearst was a woman who rose beyond the gender norms of her age to exert considerable influence both within her community and nationally. In Phoebe Apperson…
David Green, “The Hundred Years War: A People’s History” (Yale UP, 2014)
Jun 19, 2019 • 54 min
The year 1453 marked the end of an intermittent yet seemingly endless series of wars between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England that, some four hundred years later, was dubbed the Hundred Years War. Depending on how you count even the most…
Eleonor Gilburd, “To See Paris and Die: The Soviet Lives of Western Culture” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Jun 19, 2019 • 87 min
Josef Stalin’s death in 1953 marked a noticeable shift in Soviet attitudes towards the West. A nation weary of war and terror welcomed with relief the new regime of Nikita Khrushchev and its focus on peaceful cooperation with foreign powers. A year after…
Carolyn J. Dean, “The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jun 19, 2019 • 38 min
Carolyn J. Dean’s The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide (Cornell University Press, 2019) examines the cultural history of the idea of the “witness to genocide” in Western Europe and the United States. She portrays the witness in…
Stacy Fahrenthold, “Between the Ottomans and the Entente: The First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora, 1908-1925” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Jun 19, 2019 • 54 min
In her debut book, Between the Ottomans and the Entente: The First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora, 1908-1925 (Oxford University Press, 2019), Stacy Fahrenthold sheds a timely light on Syrian and Lebanese immigrants who established vibrant…
Shennette Garrett-Scott, “Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Jun 19, 2019 • 41 min
Think running an insurance company or a bank is hard? Try doing it as an African-American woman in the Jim Crow South. Shennette Garrett-Scott’s new book, Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal (Columbia University Press,…
Jonathan Fennell, “Fighting the People’s War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jun 18, 2019 • 62 min
Jonathan Fennell’s new book, Fighting the People’s War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is an unprecedented, panoramic history of the ‘citizen armies’ of the United Kingdom, Australia,…
Chris Donnelly, “Doc, Donnie, The Kid and Billy Brawl: How the 1985 Mets and Yankees Fought For New York’s Baseball Soul” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Jun 18, 2019 • 47 min
Chris Donnelly’s new book Doc, Donnie, The Kid and Billy Brawl: How the 1985 Mets and Yankees Fought For New York’s Baseball Soul (University of Nebraska Press, 2019) focuses on the 1985 New York baseball season, a season like no other since the Mets came…
David Milne, “Worldmaking: The Art and Science of American Diplomacy” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015)
Jun 18, 2019 • 74 min
There are countless ways to study the history of U.S. foreign policy. David Milne, however, makes the case that it is “often best understood” as “intellectual history.” In his innovative book, Worldmaking: The Art and Science of American Diplomacy…
Marisol LeBrón, “Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico” (U California Press, 2019)
Jun 18, 2019 • 64 min
Marisol LeBrón’s new book, Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico (University of California Press, 2019), examines the rise of and resistance to punitive governance (tough on crime policing policies) in Puerto Rico from the…
Emily Wilcox, “Revolutionary Bodies: Chinese Dance and the Socialist Legacy” (U California Press, 2018)
Jun 18, 2019 • 67 min
What is “Chinese dance,” how did it take shape in during China’s socialist period, and how has this socialist form continued to influence Post-Mao expressive cultures in the People’s Republic of China? These are the questions that Emily Wilcox, Assistant…
Kara Ritzheimer, “‘Trash,’ Censorship, and National Identity in Early Twentieth-Century Germany” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Jun 18, 2019 • 59 min
Convinced that sexual immorality and unstable gender norms were endangering national recovery after World War One, German lawmakers drafted a constitution in 1919 legalizing the censorship of movies and pulp fiction, and prioritizing social rights over…
Terence Keel, “Divine Variations: How Christian Thought Became Racial Science” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Jun 17, 2019 • 53 min
We often think of scientific racism as a pseudo-science of a bygone age, yet in both academic population genetics and popular ancestry testing, the specter of race continues to inflect our senses of biology and being. In Divine Variations: How Christian…
Jeannette Eileen Jones, “Search of Brightest Africa: Reimagining the Dark Continent in American Culture, 1884-1936” (U Georgia Press, 2011)
Jun 17, 2019 • 30 min
When President Trump talked of Africa as a continent of “shithole countries” where people lived in huts, he was drawing on a set of ideas made popular in the 19th century. “Darkest Africa” became a favorite trope of explorers like Henry Morton Stanley who…
Brett Grainger, “Church in the Wild: Evangelicals in Antebellum America” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jun 17, 2019 • 47 min
We often credit the Transcendentalists with introducing a revolutionary new appreciation for nature into American spirituality when they claimed that God could be found in the forests, mountains, and fields. In Church in the Wild: Evangelicals in…
Ryan Grim, “We’ve Got People: From Jesse Jackson to AOC, the End of Big Money and the Rise of a Movement” (Strong Arm Press, 2019)
Jun 17, 2019 • 48 min
The modern progressive movement is rising in influence, intensity and numbers. Just where did it come from and where is it going? Ryan Grim, D.C bureau chief for The Intercept digs into the movement’s origins in We’ve Got People: From Jesse Jackson to…
Heidi Tworek, “News from Germany: The Competition to Control World Communications, 1900-1945” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jun 17, 2019 • 58 min
In our current moment marred by media monopolies and disinformation campaigns, it is easy to get caught up in the dizzying temporality of the news cycle and think these are new phenomena. Heidi Tworek’s impressive new book, News from Germany: The…
Patton E. Burchett, “A Genealogy of Devotion: Bhakti, Tantra, Yoga, and Sufism in North India” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Jun 14, 2019 • 61 min
How distinct is Indian devotionalism from other strands of Indian religiosity? Is devotionalism necessarily at odds with asceticism in the Hindu world? What about the common contrasting of Hindu devotionalism as ‘religion’ with tantra as ‘black magic’?…
PJ Capelotti, “Adventures in Archaeology: The Wreck of the Orca II and Other Explorations” (U Florida Press, 2018)
Jun 14, 2019 • 40 min
Anthropologist PJ Capelotti discusses the role of exploration archaeology in understanding the Pacific voyage of Kon-Tiki, the Arctic airship expeditions of Walter Wellman, and the fate of Orca II, a fishing boat used in the film Jaws. Capelotti is a…
Mark Peterson, “The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic Power” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jun 14, 2019 • 141 min
In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, The…
A. Nilsen, K. Nielsen, A. Vaidya, “Indian Democracy: Origins, Trajectories, Contestations” (Pluto Press, 2019)
Jun 14, 2019 • 51 min
More than 70 years after its founding, with Narendra Modi’s authoritarian Hindu nationalists in government, is the dream of Indian democracy still alive and well? Indian Democracy: Origins, Trajectories, Contestations (Pluto Press, 2019), a prescient…
Sara K. Eskridge, “Rube Tube: CBS and Rural Comedy in the Sixties” (U Missouri Press, 2019)
Jun 14, 2019 • 52 min
The television comedies of the 1960s set in the American South epitomize American innocence. But in their original historical, social, and commercial context, their portrayals of southern life and their omissions of political events and people of color…
Paul Thomas Chamberlin, “The Cold War’s Killing Fields: Rethinking the Long Peace” (Harper, 2018)
Jun 13, 2019 • 64 min
Paul Thomas Chamberlin has written a book about the Cold War that makes important claims about the nature and reasons for genocide in the last half of the Twentieth Century. In The Cold War’s Killing Fields: Rethinking the Long Peace (Harper, 2018),…
Vahram Ter-Matevosyan, “Turkey, Kemalism and the Soviet Union: Problems of Modernization, Ideology and Interpretation” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
Jun 13, 2019 • 36 min
Vahram Ter-Matevosyan new book Turkey, Kemalism and the Soviet Union: Problems of Modernization, Ideology and Interpretation (Palgrave Macmillan, examines the Kemalist ideology of Turkey from two perspectives. It discusses major problems in the existing…
Marc Gallicchio and Waldo Heinrich, “Implacable Foes: War in the Pacific, 1944-1945” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Jun 13, 2019 • 72 min
Serious and casual scholars and readers interested in the Pacific War would do well to commit reading Marc Gallicchio’s and Waldo Heinrich’s massive study of the conflict’s last two years, Implacable Foes: War in the Pacific, 1944-1945 (Oxford University…
Matilda Rabinowitz, “Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century” (ILR Press, 2017)
Jun 13, 2019 • 59 min
It’s quite common these days to hear young people being urged to collect and record the stories of their grandparents or parents in order to learn and preserve their family’s history. For a few fortunate folks, like Robbin Légère Henderson, such a record…
E. Douglas Bomberger, “Making Music American: 1917 and the Transformation of Culture” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Jun 13, 2019 • 61 min
There has been a recent trend in books that explore one year in detail: 1914, 1927, and 1968 have all received this treatment. E. Douglas Bomberger’s new book Making Music American: 1917 and the Transformation of Culture from Oxford University Press…
Jeremy Black, “The English Press: A History” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Jun 13, 2019 • 62 min
In this succinct and brilliantly written one-volume account of the rise and fall of the English press, premier historian Jeremy Black, the most prolific historian writing in the Anglophone world, if not on the entire planet, traces the English press’s…
Thomas Dodman, “What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Jun 12, 2019 • 62 min
Feelings have a history and nostalgia has its own. In What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion(University of Chicago Press, 2018) Thomas Dodman explores the history of nostalgia from the late seventeenth to the late nineteenth…
Dannel Jones, “An African in Imperial London: The Indomitable Life of A.B.C. Merriman-Labor” (Hurst, 2018)
Jun 12, 2019 • 64 min
In 1919 a man named Ohlohr Maigi died of tuberculosis in London, in deep poverty. He had arrived over a decade before in the imperial capital bearing different name, seeking education, fame and fortune. Some of these he had found, but ultimately he had…
Kirsteen M. MacKenzie, “The Solemn League and Covenant of the Three Kingdoms and the Cromwellian Union 1643-1663” (Routledge, 2018)
Jun 12, 2019 • 35 min
Kirsteen M. MacKenzie, an historian who has taught for many years at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, has published a definitive account of the relationships between England, Scotland and Ireland during the Cromwellian republic of the 1650s. The…
Nara Milanich, “Paternity: The Elusive Quest for the Father” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jun 11, 2019 • 64 min
Nara Milanich’s Paternity: The Elusive Quest for the Father (Harvard University Press, 2019) explains how fatherhood, long believed to be impossible to know with certainty, became a biological “fact” that could be ascertained with scientific testing.…
Christina Proenza-Coles, “American Founders: How People of African Descent Established Freedom in the New World” (NewSouth Books, 2019)
Jun 11, 2019 • 54 min
Christina Proenza-Coles’ new book American Founders: How People of African Descent Established Freedom in the New World (NewSouth Books, 2019) reveals men and women of African descent as key protagonists in the story of American democracy. It chronicles…
Brian Cremins, “Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia” (UP of Mississippi, 2017)
Jun 11, 2019 • 67 min
Brian Cremins’ book Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia (University Press of Mississippi, 2017) explores the history of Billy Batson, a boy who met a wizard that allowed him to transform into a superhero. When Billy says, “Shazam!” he becomes Captain…
Jane Hooper, “Feeding Globalization: Madagascar and the Provisioning Trade, 1600-1800” (Ohio UP, 2017)
Jun 10, 2019 • 32 min
Madagascar lies so close to the African coast—and so near the predictable wind system of the Indian Ocean—that it’s easy to overlook the island, the fourth largest in the world, when talking about oceanic trade and exploration. But there is a lot to tell.…
Thomas S. Mullaney, “The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China” (Stanford UP, 2019)
Jun 10, 2019 • 73 min
The Chinese landscape is dramatically changing. Modernization has drastically altered Chinese infrastructure, urban zones, waterways, and even rural spaces. These changes have also affected Chinese burial practices and the resting places of the deceased.…
Mark Galeotti, “The Vory: Russia’s Super Mafia” (Yale UP, 2018)
Jun 10, 2019 • 73 min
The Vory: Russia’s Super Mafia (Yale University Press, 2018) by Mark Galeotti is an engrossing read about a topic mainstream scholarship has largely ignored: Russia’s criminal underworld. With Galeotti as our guide, we delve into the colorful world of the…
Anthony Kaldellis, “Romanland: Ethnicity and Empire in Byzantium” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Jun 10, 2019 • 48 min
Though commonly used today to identify a polity that lasted for over a millennium, the label “Byzantine empire” is an anachronism imposed by more recent generations. As Anthony Kaldellis explains in Romanland: Ethnicity and Empire in Byzantium (Harvard…
Aaron Rock-Singer, “Practicing Islam in Egypt: Print Media and Islamic Revival” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Jun 7, 2019 • 83 min
Discussions of Middle East politics will inevitably bring Islamism to the table and with it, questions of how Islam in its current iterations came to be. In most cases, the Islamic revival is emphasized as a major turning point in 20th-century Islam. In…
Peter Guardino, “The Dead March: A History of the Mexican-American War” (Harvard UP, 2017)
Jun 7, 2019 • 67 min
The Mexican-American War was one of the pivotal moments in 19th-century American history. It bridged the Jacksonian period and the Civil War era and was a highly controversial and politically partisan conflict, the first American war to result in…
Stephan Bullard, “A Day-by-Day Chronicle of the 2013-2016 Ebola Outbreak” (Springer, 2018)
Jun 7, 2019 • 28 min
Why did Ebola, a virus so deadly that it killed or immobilized its victims within days, have time to become a full-blown epidemic? That’s what happened in 2013 in when the virus, already well-known to virologists and epidemiologists, broke out in West…
Francesca Trivellato, “The Promise and Peril of Credit” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Jun 7, 2019 • 61 min
In 1647, the French author Étienne Cleirac asserted in his book Les us, et coustumes de la mer that the credit instruments known as bills of exchange had been invented by Jews. In The Promise and Peril of Credit: What a Forgotten Legend about Jews and…
Jennifer Dixon, “Dark Pasts: Changing the State’s Story in Turkey and Japan” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Jun 6, 2019 • 62 min
Jennifer Dixon’s Dark Pasts: Changing the State’s Story in Turkey and Japan (Cornell University Press, 2018), investigates the Japanese and Turkish states’ narratives of their “dark pasts,” the Nanjing Massacre (1937-38) and Armenian Genocide (1915-17),…
Ian Saxine, “Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier” (NYU Press, 2019)
Jun 6, 2019 • 87 min
In Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (NYU Press, 2019), Ian Saxine, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Bridgewater State University, shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English…
Manu Karuka, “Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad” (U California Press, 2019)
Jun 5, 2019 • 67 min
What does anti-imperialism look like from the vantage point of North America? In Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad(University of California Press, 2019), Manu Karuka (Barnard College) answers this…
Daniel Hershenzon, “The Captive Sea: Slavery, Communication, and Commerce in Early Modern Spain and the Mediterranean” (U Penn Press, 2018)
Jun 5, 2019 • 59 min
For hundreds of years, people living on the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea enslaved one another. Moslems from North Africa captured Italians, French, and Spaniards; and North African Moslems were in turn enslaved by those nations. As prisoners, their…
Jennifer Helgren, “American Girls and Global Responsibility: A New Relation to the World during the Early Cold War” (Rutgers UP, 2017)
Jun 4, 2019 • 62 min
In her book, American Girls and Global Responsibility: A New Relation to the World during the Early Cold War (Rutgers University Press, 2017), Jennifer Helgren traces the creation of a new internationalist girl citizenship in the first two decades…
Robbie Richardson, “The Savage and Modern Self: North American Indians in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
Jun 4, 2019 • 46 min
As they explored and struggled to establish settlements in what they called ‘new found lands’, the encounter with the peoples of those lands deeply affected how the British saw themselves. From the onset of colonisation, exotic visitors appeared in…
Demetra Kasimis, “The Perpetual Immigrant and the Limits of Athenian Democracy” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Jun 3, 2019 • 52 min
Demetra Kasimis’s new book, The Perpetual Immigrant and the Limits of Athenian Democracy (Cambridge University Press, 2018) interrogates the role and unstable place of the metics (metoikoi) in Athenian society. The book focuses on three different…
Scott Wallace, “The Unconquered: In Search of the Amazon’s Last Uncontacted Tribes” (Broadway Books, 2012)
Jun 3, 2019 • 35 min
Journalist Scott Wallace talks about a 2002 FUNAI expedition to find the Arrow People, one of the last uncontacted tribes in the world. Wallace is a writer and photojournalist who covered the wars in El Salvador and Nicaragua in the 1980s for CBS and The…
Cindy Yik-Yi Chu, “The Chinese Sisters of the Precious Blood and the Evolution of the Catholic Church” (Palgrave, 2016)
Jun 3, 2019 • 41 min
The history of Christianity in China has been dominated by accounts of men and of male institutions. In this important new work, Cindy Yik-Yi Chu, who is a professor of history at Hong Kong Baptist University, opens up an important new archive in Hong…
Christopher J. Galdieri, “Stranger in a Strange State: The Politics of Carpetbagging from Robert Kennedy to Scott Brown” (SUNY Press, 2019)
May 31, 2019 • 50 min
Chris Galdieri has written an engaging analysis of carpetbagging in American politics. Stranger in a Strange State: The Politics of Carpetbagging from Robert Kennedy to Scott Brown (SUNY Press, 2019), and its focus on individual case studies, highlight…
Christopher Childers, “The Webster-Hayne Debate: Defining Nationhood in the Early American Republic” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
May 31, 2019 • 68 min
No, not the Lincoln-Douglas debates. Perhaps even more important than that Illinois contest of 1858 was the Webster-Hayne debate of 1830. Confused? Drawing a blank? Not really your fault. Would you be even more surprised to hear that these were debates…
Norman Eisen, “The Last Palace: Europe’s Turbulent Century in Five Lives and One Legendary House” (Crown, 2018)
May 31, 2019 • 37 min
As we’ve previously discussed, there are a lot of books about democracy filling book store and library shelves right now. Norman Eisen could have written a book in the vein of Daniel Ziblatt and Steven Levitsky’s How Democracies Die or David Frum’s…
Gregg Bocketti, “The Invention of the Beautiful Game: Football and the Making of Modern Brazil” (UP of Florida, 2016)
May 31, 2019 • 67 min
Today we are joined by Gregg Bocketti, Professor of History at Transylvania University, and author of The Invention of the Beautiful Game: Football and the Making of Modern Brazil(University Press of Florida, 2016). In our conversation, we discussed the…
Mimi Hanaoka, “Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography: Persian Histories from the Periphery” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
May 31, 2019 • 53 min
How do peripheral places assert the centrality of their identity? Why are fanciful events, like dreams and myths, useful narrative elements for identity construction and arguments about authority, legitimacy, and rhetoric? In Authority and Identity in…
Noam Maggor, “Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age” (Harvard UP, 2017)
May 30, 2019 • 89 min
Tracking the movement of finance capital toward far-flung investment frontiers, Noam Maggor, Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London, re-conceives the emergence of modern capitalism in the United States. Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and…
John Etty, “Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union: Krokodil’s Political Cartoons” (UP of Mississippi, 2019)
May 30, 2019 • 44 min
In Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union: Krokodil’s Political Cartoons (University Press of Mississippi, 2019), Dr. John Etty explains how Krokodil magazine provided a venue in which the state, the the magazine’s editors, and readers all participated in…
Veronica Hinke, “The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining, and Style” (Regnery History, 2019)
May 30, 2019 • 53 min
Fascination with The Titanic has not faded, though more than 105 years have passed since its tragic sinking when so many lives were lost, and an era of gilded glamor ended. Culinary historian, Veronica Hinke’s new book, The Last Night on the Titanic:…
Niall Geraghty, “The Polyphonic Machine: Capitalism, Political Violence, and Resistance in Contemporary Argentine Literature” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2019)
May 30, 2019 • 36 min
What options for resistance are left to the author of fiction in a nation structured by totalizing political and economic violence? This is the question at the heart of Niall Geraghty’s eloquent and engaging book, The Polyphonic Machine: Capitalism,…
Amy Murrell Taylor, “Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps” (UNC Press, 2018)
May 29, 2019 • 61 min
The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of…
Barbara K. Gold, “Perpetua: Athlete of God” (Oxford UP, 2018)
May 29, 2019 • 56 min
One of the first and most famous of Christian martyrs was Perpetua, who died in Carthage in the early 3rd century CE. Though there is no record of her life beyond the details contained in a single text, in her book Perpetua: Athlete of God(Oxford…
Ryan Hanley, “Beyond Slavery and Abolition: Black British Writing, c. 1770 -1830” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
May 29, 2019 • 48 min
To our eyes, eighteenth-century Britain can look like a world of opposites. On one hand everything was new: political parties and a ‘prime’ minister emerged in parliament; their sometime unruly debates were recorded by an expanding political press, whose…
Kerim Yasar, “Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945” (Columbia UP, 2018)
May 28, 2019 • 91 min
Electrified Voices: How the Telephone, Phonograph, and Radio Shaped Modern Japan, 1868-1945 (Columbia UP, 2018) explores the soundscapes of modernity in Japan. In this book, Kerim Yasar argues that modern technologies of sound reproduction and…
James Miller, “Can Democracy Work?: A Short History of a Radical Idea, from Ancient Athens to Our World” (FSG, 2018)
May 28, 2019 • 44 min
In his book Can Democracy Work? A Short History of a Radical Idea from Ancient Athens to Our World (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), James Miller encapsulates 2500 years of democracy history into about 250 pages — making the case that “people power” will…
Dirk Jongkind, “An Introduction to the Greek New Testament, Produced at Tyndale House, Cambridge” (Crossway, 2019)
May 28, 2019 • 29 min
Is the New Testament text reliable? What do we do with textual variants? How do I use the Greek New Testament? This short book, An Introduction to the Greek New Testament, Produced at Tyndale House, Cambridge (Crossway, 2019) provides crucial information…
Timothy A. Sayle, “Enduring Alliance: A History of NATO and the Postwar Global Order” (Cornell UP, 2019)
May 28, 2019 • 52 min
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization regularly appears in newspapers and political science scholarship. Surprisingly, historians have yet to devote the attention that the organization’s history merits. Timothy A. Sayle, an Assistant Professor of history…
Alexander Barnes, “Play Ball! Doughboys and Baseball during the Great War” (Schiffer Publishing, 2019)
May 28, 2019 • 31 min
Today we are joined by Alexander Barnes, who co-wrote Play Ball! Doughboys and Baseball during the Great War (Schiffer Publishing, 2019) with Peter F. Belmonte and Samuel O. Barnes. Blending sports and military history, the authors revisit the national…
Linda M. Grasso, “Equal under the Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe and Twentieth-Century Feminism” (U New Mexico Press, 2017)
May 27, 2019 • 64 min
Linda M. Grasso’s Equal under the Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe & Twentieth-Century Feminism (University of New Mexico Press, 2017) provides an in-depth look at O’Keeffe’s ambivalent relationship with feminism from her early beginnings as a New Woman of the…
John J. Curley, “Global Art and the Cold War” (Laurence King Publishers, 2019)
May 27, 2019 • 53 min
It was the passionate amateur painter, Winston Churchill, who introduced one of the Cold War’s key metaphors: The Iron Curtain. As John J. Curley argues in Global Art and the Cold War (Laurence King Publishers, 2019), this provocative image defined the…
James Crossland, “War, Law and Humanity: The Campaign to Control Warfare, 1853-1914” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
May 27, 2019 • 65 min
Beginning in the mid-1850s, a number of people in Europe and the United States undertook a range of efforts in response to the horrors of war. In his book War, Law and Humanity: The Campaign to Control Warfare, 1853-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2018) James Crossland…
Jeremy Black, “War and its Causes” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
May 24, 2019 • 39 min
Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter, is well-known as one of the most prolific of publishing historians. His latest book, War and its Causes (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019), returns to a subject upon which he has already published several…
Adrian Goldsworthy, “Hadrian’s Wall” (Basic Books, 2018)
May 24, 2019 • 56 min
Stretching across the north of England, from coast to coast, are the 73-mile long remnants of a fortification built by the Roman Army during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian. It is, as our guest Adrian Goldsworthy has written, “the largest of the many…
Maren A. Ehlers, “Give and Take: Poverty and the Status Order in Early Modern Japan” (Harvard U Asia Center, 2018)
May 24, 2019 • 68 min
Maren A. Ehlers’s Give and Take: Poverty and the Status Order in Early Modern Japan (Harvard University Asia Center, 2018) examines the ways in which ordinary subjects—including many so-called outcastes and other marginalized groups—participated in the…
Sandra Mendiola García, “Street Democracy: Vendors, Violence, and Public Space in Late Twentieth-Century Mexico” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
May 23, 2019 • 55 min
In Street Democracy: Vendors, Violence, and Public Space in Late Twentieth-Century Mexico (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), Sandra C. Mendiola García analyzes independent union activism among street vendors facing state repression and the displacing…
Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, “How Democracies Die” (Crown, 2018)
May 23, 2019 • 35 min
Daniel Ziblatt has done a lot of interviews since the release of How Democracies Die (Crown, 2018) the bestselling book he co-wrote with Steven Levitsky. But we asked him a question he’d never gotten before — about a line toward the end of the book when…
Martin Collins, “A Telephone for the World: Motorola, Iridium, and the Making of a Global Age” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
May 23, 2019 • 53 min
It’s easy to take for granted that one can pick up a cell phone and call someone on the other side of the planet. But, until very recently, this had been a mere dream. Martin Collins’ A Telephone for the World: Motorola, Iridium, and the Making of a…
Heike Bauer, “The Hirschfeld Archives: Violence, Death, and Modern Queer Culture” (Temple UP, 2017)
May 23, 2019 • 42 min
Influential sexologist and activist Magnus Hirschfeld founded Berlin’s Institute of Sexual Sciences in 1919 as a home and workplace to study homosexual rights activism and support transgender people. It was destroyed by the Nazis in 1933. This episode in…
Jeremy Black, “The World at War, 1914-1945” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019)
May 22, 2019 • 51 min
In one of his latest books, The World at War, 1914-1945 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019), Professor of History at Exeter University, Jeremy Black, the most prolific historian in the Anglo-phone world, if not indeed on the entire planet, explores the forty-one…
Lisa Blee and Jean M. O’Brien, “Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit” (UNC Press, 2019)
May 22, 2019 • 88 min
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin’s statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the…
Jerry T. Watkins III, “Queering the Redneck Riviera: Sexuality and the Rise of Florida Tourism” (UP of Florida, 2018)
May 21, 2019 • 54 min
As the title suggests, Jerry T. Watkins III’s Queering the Redneck Riviera: Sexuality and the Rise of Florida Tourism (University Press of Florida, 2018) re-queers this North Florida tourist destination showing how people who defied gender and sexual…
Quincy D. Newell, “Your Sister in the Gospel: The Life of Jane Manning James, a Nineteenth-Century Black Mormon” (Oxford UP, 2019)
May 21, 2019 • 54 min
“Dear Brother,” Jane Manning James wrote to Joseph F. Smith in 1903, “I take this opportunity of writing to ask you if I can get my endowments and also finish the work I have begun for my dead …. Your sister in the Gospel, Jane E. James.” A faithful…
Sarah Miller-Davenport, “Gateway State: Hawai’i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire” (Princeton UP, 2019)
May 21, 2019 • 56 min
One of my talking points when hanging out with my fellow diplomatic historians is the painful absence of scholarship on Hawaii. Too many political histories treat Hawaii’s statehood as a kind of historical inevitability, an event that was bound to pass…
Guy Beiner, “Forgetful Remembrance: Social Forgetting and Vernacular Historiography of a Rebellion in Ulster” (Oxford UP, 2018)
May 21, 2019 • 36 min
Guy Beiner, who is professor of modern history at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, has written one of the longest and certainly one of the most extraordinary recent contributions to the historiography of Ireland and of memory studies. His new book,…
Stephen Fritz, “The First Soldier: Hitler as a Military Leader” (Yale UP, 2018)
May 21, 2019 • 76 min
In his new book, The First Soldier: Hitler as a Military Leader (Yale University Press, 2018), Stephen Fritz professor of history at East Tennessee State University reexamines Hitler as a military commander and strategist. That Hitler saw World War II as…
Kris Lane, “Potosí: The Silver City That Changed the World” (U California Press, 2019)
May 20, 2019 • 61 min
In 1545, a native Andean prospector hit pay dirt on a desolate red mountain in highland Bolivia. There followed the world’s greatest silver bonanza, making the Cerro Rico or “Rich Hill” and the Imperial Villa of Potosí instant legends, famous from…
Gregory Smits, “Maritime Ryukyu, 1050–1650” (U Hawaii Press, 2018)
May 20, 2019 • 68 min
Conventional portrayals of early Ryukyu are based on official histories written between 1650 and 1750. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Gregory Smits makes extensive use of scholarship in archaeology and anthropology and leverages unconventional…
Marixa Lasso, ”Erased: The Untold Story of the Panama Canal” (Harvard UP, 2019)
May 20, 2019 • 36 min
Many of our presumptions about the Panama Canal Zone are wrong; it was not carved out of uninhabited jungle, the creation of Lake Gatún did not flood towns and force them to move, people living in the zone prior to the construction of the canal were not…
David Woodbridge, “Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China” (Brill, 2019)
May 17, 2019 • 27 min
Drawing on new archival resources, and opening up an entirely new research agenda in the field, David Woodbridge has written an outstanding new book. Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China (Brill, 2019)…
Toby Green, “A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
May 17, 2019 • 46 min
All too often, the history of early modern Africa is told from the perspective of outsiders. In his book A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Toby Green draws upon…
Jennifer Thomson, “The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health” (UNC Press, 2019)
May 17, 2019 • 46 min
The first wealth is health, according to Emerson. Among health’s riches is its political potential. Few know this better than environmentalists. In her debut book, The Wild and the Toxic: American Environmentalism and the Politics of Health (UNC Press,…
Nico Slate, “Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind” (U Washington Press, 2019)
May 17, 2019 • 54 min
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Nico Slate, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, about the intersections between diet, spirituality, health, and politics for one of the world’s most famous nonviolent political activists,…
Matthew W. King, “Ocean of Milk, Ocean of Blood: A Mongolian Monk in the Ruins of the Qing Empire” (Columbia UP, 2019)
May 16, 2019 • 64 min
After the fall of the Qing empire, amid nationalist and socialist upheaval, Buddhist monks in the Mongolian frontiers of the Soviet Union and Republican China faced a chaotic and increasingly uncertain world. In this book, Matthew W. King tells the story…
Rosalyn LaPier, “Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
May 16, 2019 • 58 min
In Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet(University of Nebraska Press, 2017), author Rosalyn LaPier, an associate professor in environmental studies at the University of Montana, complicates several…
Andrew Wallis, “Stepp’d in Blood: Akazu and the Architects of the Rwandan Genocide Against the Tutsis” (Zero Books, 2019)
May 16, 2019 • 66 min
Last month Rwanda commemorated the 25th anniversary of the genocide. Unlike the recent outpouring of books marking hundredth anniversary of the end of the First World War, there was only a short flurry of newspaper and radio remembrances of the events of…
Max Edelson, “The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America before Independence” (Harvard UP, 2017)
May 16, 2019 • 56 min
When we think of the history of the British empire we tend to think big: oceans were crossed; colonies grew from small settlements to territories many times larger than England; entire Continents, each with substantial indigenous populations, were brought…
Harold J. Cook, “The Young Descartes: Nobility, Rumor, and War” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
May 15, 2019 • 33 min
Harold J. Cook talks about the travels and trials of the young Descartes, a man who spent as much time traveling and fighting as he did studying philosophy. Cook is John F. Nickoll Professor of History at Brown University. He is the author of The Young…
Derrick Spires, “The Practice of Citizenship: Black Politics and Print Culture in the Early United States” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
May 15, 2019 • 52 min
With talk about birthright citizenship and border walls running rampant in Trump’s America, there are many scholars reaching back to antebellum America to historically ground today’s citizens in debates from the past that hold relevance now about both…
Scott S. Reese, “Imperial Muslims: Islam, Community and Authority in the Indian Ocean, 1839-1937” (Edinburgh UP, 2017)
May 15, 2019 • 64 min
Religion and empire are often intertwined. Regarding Muslims there are well known dynasties like the Umayyad, the Abbasid, the Fatimid, the Ottoman, and many others. But the empire governing the largest Muslim population was, of course, the British. In…
Aram Gousouzian, “The Men and the Moment: The Election of 1968 and the Rise of Partisan Politics in America” (UNC Press, 2019)
May 14, 2019 • 33 min
The endlessly fascinating 1968 presidential race transformed American politics in ways that are still being felt. Aram Goudsouzian explores the characters who shaped that race in The Men and the Moment: The Election of 1968 and the Rise of Partisan…
Heather R. White, “Reforming Sodom: Protestants and the Rise of Gay Rights” (UNC Press, 2015)
May 14, 2019 • 34 min
With a focus on mainline Protestants and gay rights activists in the twentieth century, Heather R. White challenges the usual picture of perennial adversaries with a new narrative about America’s religious and sexual past. In her new book Reforming Sodom:…
Henry Kissinger and Winston Lord, “Kissinger on Kissinger: Reflections on Diplomacy, Grand Strategy, and Leadership” (All Points Books, 2019)
May 14, 2019 • 72 min
In a series of riveting and in depth interviews, America’s senior statesman, former Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, discusses the challenges of directing foreign policy during times of great global tension. With insights which are pertinent to the…
Deonnie Moodie, “The Making of a Modern Temple and a Hindu City: Kālīghāṭ and Kolkata” (Oxford UP, 2018)
May 13, 2019 • 60 min
Dr. Deonnie Moodie is Assistant Professor of South Asian Religions at the University of Oklahoma. Her book, The Making of a Modern Temple and a Hindu City: Kālīghāṭ and Kolkata (Oxford University Press, 2018), examines the history of the Kalighat temple…
David Courtwright, “The Age of Addiction: How Bad Habits Became Big Business” (Harvard UP, 2019)
May 10, 2019 • 44 min
We are living in an age of addiction, from compulsive gaming and binge eating to pornography and opioid abuse. Today I talked with historian David Courtwright about the global nature of pleasure, vice, and capitalism. His new book is called The Age of…
Jane Caple, “Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
May 9, 2019 • 53 min
In this podcast, I speak with Prof. Jane Caple about her recently published book, Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet (University of Hawaii Press, 2019). The revival of mass monasticism in Tibet in the early 1980s is one of the most…
Karin Rosemblatt, “The Science and Politics of Race in Mexico and the United States, 1910–1950” (UNC Press, 2018)
May 9, 2019 • 54 min
Karin Rosemblatt’s new book, The Science and Politics of Race in Mexico and the United States, 1910–1950 (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), traces how U.S.- and Mexican-trained intellectuals, social and human scientists, and anthropologists…
Carrie Baker, “Fighting the US Youth Sex Trade: Gender, Race, and Politics” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
May 8, 2019 • 63 min
Campaigns against prostitution of young people in the United States have surged and ebbed multiple times over the last fifty years. Carrie Baker’s Fighting the US Youth Sex Trade: Gender, Race, and Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2018) examines how…
Caitlín Eilís Barrett, “Domesticating Empire: Egyptian Landscapes in Pompeian Gardens” (Oxford UP, 2019)
May 7, 2019 • 102 min
Domesticating Empire: Egyptian Landscapes in Pompeian Gardens (Oxford University Press, 2019) is the first contextually-oriented monograph on Egyptian imagery in Roman households. Caitlín Eilís Barrett, Associate Professor of Classics at Cornell…
Houri Berberian, “Roving Revolutionaries: Armenians and the Connected Revolutions in the Russian, Iranian and Ottoman Worlds” (U California Press, 2019)
May 7, 2019 • 56 min
In her newest book, Roving Revolutionaries: Armenians and the Connected Revolutions in the Russian, Iranian and Ottoman Worlds (University of California Press, 2019), Dr. Houri Berberian uses a transnational or transimperial approach to examine the…
Ryan Hackenbracht, “National Reckonings: The Last Judgement and Literature in Milton’s England” (Cornell UP, 2019)
May 6, 2019 • 42 min
Ryan Hackenbracht, who is an associate professor of English at Texas Tech University, has just published one of the most innovative and stimulating discussions of the interplay between literature and religion in early modern England. National Reckonings:…
Jeanne Theoharis, “The Strange Careers of the Jim Crow North: Segregation and Struggle outside of the South” (NYU Press, 2019)
May 6, 2019 • 43 min
In this New Books Network/Gotham Center for NYC History podcast, guest host Beth Harpaz, editor of the City University of New York website SUM, interviews Jeanne Theoharis, distinguished professor of political science at Brooklyn College. Their topic is a…
Erin M. Kempker, “Big Sister: Feminism, Conservatism and Conspiracy in the Heartland” (U Illinois, 2018)
May 3, 2019 • 54 min
Erin M. Kempker is an associate professor of history at Mississippi University for Women and the author of Big Sister: Feminism, Conservatism and Conspiracy in the Heartland (University of Illinois, 2018). The author examines how 1970s right-wing women…
Christina Yi, “Colonizing Language: Cultural Production and Language Politics in Modern Japan and Korea” (Columbia UP, 2018)
May 2, 2019 • 62 min
The fact that Korea’s experience of Japanese imperialism plays a role in present-day Japan-Korea relations is no secret to anyone. Questions of guilt, responsibility and atonement continue to bubble below, and occasionally break through, the surface of…
Nikolai Krementsov, “With and Without Galton: Vasilii Florinskii and the Fate of Eugenics in Russia” (Open Book Publishers, 2018)
May 2, 2019 • 82 min
With and Without Galton: Vasilii Florinskii and the Fate of Eugenics in Russia (Open Book Publishers, 2018), Professor Nikolai Krementsov’s recent history of Russian eugenics, reflects on a broad problem: How to acknowledge what eugenics movements…
Jeremy Black, “Imperial Legacies: The British Empire Around the World” (Encounter Books, 2019)
May 1, 2019 • 47 min
Are you tired of the constant refrain from our campus radicals and their bien-pensant allies in the intelligentsia that the United States and the United Kingdom, AKA the American and the British empires are the source of all the problems in the world,…
Peter J. Williams, “Can We Trust the Gospels?” (Crossway, 2018)
Apr 30, 2019 • 45 min
Is there evidence to believe the Gospels? The Gospels―Matthew, Mark, Luke, John―are four accounts of Jesus’s life and teachings while on earth. But should we accept them as historically accurate? What evidence is there that the recorded events actually…
Eric T. Kasper and Quentin D. Vieregge, “The United States Constitution in Film: Part of Our National Culture” (Lexington Books, 2018)
Apr 30, 2019 • 66 min
The U.S. Constitution is often depicted in popular films, teaching lessons about what this founding document means and what it requires. The United States Constitution in Film: Part of Our National Culture (Lexington Books, 2018) examines several…
Henning Pieper, “Fegelein’s Horsemen and Genocidal Warfare: The SS Cavalry Brigade in the Soviet Union” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
Apr 30, 2019 • 56 min
In his book, Fegelein’s Horsemen and Genocidal Warfare: The SS Cavalry Brigade in the Soviet Union (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Dr. Henning Pieper, examines the conduct of the SS Cavalry Brigade during World War II. The SS Cavalry Brigade was a unit of the…
Michael J. Mazarr, “Leap of Faith: Hubris, Negligence, and America’s Greatest Foreign Policy Tragedy” (Public Affairs, 2019)
Apr 30, 2019 • 85 min
Michael J. Mazarr has written a history of the policy planning process leading up to the Iraq War in 2003. Mazarr has conducted over one hundred interviews with senior policy officials from the George W. Bush administration, combined with a comprehensive…
Jeffrey S. McDonald, “John Gerstner and the Renewal of Presbyterian and Reformed Evangelicalism in Modern America” (Pickwick, 2017)
Apr 29, 2019 • 37 min
One of the most important trends within evangelicalism over the last half-century has been a renewal of Reformed theology. In this important new book, Jeffrey S. McDonald, who is a Presbyterian pastor in Bellevue, Nebraska, and an affiliate professor of…
Pang Yang Huei, “Strait Rituals: China, Taiwan, and the United States in the Taiwan Strait Crises, 1954-1958” (Hong Kong UP, 2019)
Apr 29, 2019 • 57 min
The Taiwan Strait Crises of 1954-55 and 1958 occurred at the height of the Cold War. Mao’s China bombarded Nationalist-controlled islands, and U.S. President Eisenhower threatened the use of nuclear weapons. These were dramatic events, and it can be a…
Ann Gleig, “American Dharma: Buddhism Beyond Modernity” (Yale UP, 2019)
Apr 26, 2019 • 89 min
In her new book, American Dharma: Buddhism Beyond Modernity (Yale University Press, 2019), Ann Gleig makes a major contribution to scholarship on American Buddhism. Gleig focuses on meditation-based convert Buddhist lineages in North America, and in…
Nancy Tomes, “Remaking the American Patient” (UNC Press, 2016)
Apr 25, 2019 • 51 min
In a work that spans the twentieth century, Nancy Tomes questions the popular—and largely unexamined—idea that in order to get good health care, people must learn to shop for it. Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned…
Vivi Lachs, “Whitechapel Noise: Jewish Immigrant Life in Yiddish Song and Verse, London, 1884-1914” (Wayne State UP, 2018)
Apr 25, 2019 • 38 min
In Whitechapel Noise: Jewish Immigrant Life in Yiddish Song and Verse, London, 1884-1914 (Wayne State University Press, 2018), Vivi Lachs, social and cultural historian, Yiddishist, performer, and associate research fellow at Birkbeck, University of…
Muhammad Qasim Zaman, “Islam in Pakistan: A History” (Princeton UP, 2018)
Apr 25, 2019 • 104 min
Muhammad Qasim Zaman’s Islam in Pakistan: A History(Princeton University Press, 2018) is a landmark publication in the fields of Religious Studies, modern Islam, South Asian Islam, and by far the most important and monumental contribution to date in the…
Matthew Fox-Amato, “Exposing Slavery: Photography, Human Bondage, and the Birth of Modern Visual Politics in America” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Apr 25, 2019 • 52 min
Shortly after its introduction, photography transformed the ways Americans made political arguments using visual images. In the mid-19th century, photographs became key tools in debates surrounding slavery. Yet, photographs were used in interesting and…
James L. A. Webb, “The Long Struggle against Malaria in Tropical Africa” (Cambridge UP, 2016)
Apr 24, 2019 • 69 min
It is estimated that malaria kills between 650,000 to 1.2 million people every year; experts believe that nearly 90 percent of these deaths occur in Africa. In The Long Struggle against Malaria in Tropical Africa (Reprint edition; Cambridge University…
Kenneth I. Helphand, “Lawrence Halprin” (Library of American Landscape History, 2017)
Apr 24, 2019 • 51 min
During a career spanning six decades, Lawrence Halprin (1916–2009) became one of the most prolific and outspoken landscape architects of his generation. He took on challenging new project types, developing a multidisciplinary practice while experimenting…
Pu Wang, “The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture” (Harvard Asia Center, 2018)
Apr 23, 2019 • 66 min
With questions over how ideas are translated across borders and between languages as acute as ever today, it is sometimes easy to forget that our efforts to understand each other are mediated through many accreted layers of previous translations. Pu…
Jacob Lee, “Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and Colonial Ambitions Along the Mississippi” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Apr 23, 2019 • 92 min
America’s waterways were once the superhighways of travel and communication. Coursing through a central line across the landscape, with tributaries connecting the South to the Great Plains and the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River meant wealth,…
E. MacDonald et al., “Time and a Place: An Environmental History of Prince Edward Island” (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2016)
Apr 22, 2019 • 112 min
With its long and well-documented history, Prince Edward Island makes a compelling case study for thousands of years of human interaction with a specific ecosystem. The pastoral landscapes, red sandstone cliffs, and small fishing villages of Canada’s…
Kristin L. Hoganson, “The Heartland: An American History” (Penguin, 2019)
Apr 22, 2019 • 94 min
The Great West. Middle America. Flyover Country. The expanse of plains, lakes, forests, and farms, between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains has carried many names. Beginning in the twentieth century, Americans began calling it The Heartland, a term…
René Weis, “The Real Traviata: The Song of Marie Duplessis” (Oxford UP, 2015)
Apr 22, 2019 • 49 min
Though she died in 1847 at a young age, Marie Duplessis inspired one of the greatest operas ever composed. In The Real Traviata: The Song of Marie Duplessis (Oxford University Press, 2015), René Weis recounts the life of the remarkable woman who overcame…
Ariel I. Ahram, “Break all the Borders: Separatism and the Resshaping of the Middle East” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Apr 22, 2019 • 49 min
Since 2011, civil wars and state failure have wracked the Arab world, underlying the misalignment between national identity and political borders. In Break all the Borders: Separatism and the Resshaping of the Middle East (Oxford UP, 2019), Ariel I. Ahram…
Kate Brown, “Manuel for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future” (Norton, 2019)
Apr 19, 2019 • 47 min
We cannot learn from disasters we do not yet understand. That conviction motivated historian Kate Brown to conduct groundbreaking research into nuclear energy’s most infamous chapter and write Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future (Norton,…
Chip Colwell, “Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits: Inside the Fight to Reclaim Native America’s Culture” (U Chicago Press, 2017)
Apr 19, 2019 • 66 min
Five decades ago, Native American leaders launched a crusade to force museums to return their sacred objects and allow them to rebury their kin. Today, hundreds of tribes use the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to help them recover…
Harold Holzer, “Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French” (Princeton Architectural Press, 2019)
Apr 19, 2019 • 67 min
Harold Holzer has written a biography of one of America’s greatest public artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, Daniel Chester French. In Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French (Princeton Architectural Press, 2019),…
Richard Hingley, “Londinium: A Biography” (Routledge, 2018)
Apr 18, 2019 • 49 min
From its humble beginnings as a crossing point over the river Thames Londinium grew into the largest city in Roman Britain. In Londinium: A Biography (Routledge, 2018), Richard Hingley draws upon the latest archaeological discoveries to provide a look at…
Michael R. Cohen, “Cotton Capitalists: American Jewish Entrepreneurship in the Reconstruction Era” (NYU Press, 2017)
Apr 17, 2019 • 47 min
Michael R. Cohen is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies at Tulane University, where he holds a Sizeler Professorship. He is the author of the newly published Cotton Capitalists: American Jewish Entrepreneurship in the Reconstruction Era from NYU Press…
Naomi Pullin, “Female Friends and the Making of Trans-Atlantic Quakerism, 1650-1750” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Apr 17, 2019 • 35 min
Naomi Pullin, who is Assistant Professor of Early Modern British History at the University of Warwick, UK, has just published an outstanding account of Female Friends and the Making of Trans-Atlantic Quakerism, 1650-1750 (Cambridge University Press,…
Lukas Engelmann, “Mapping AIDS: Visual Histories of an Enduring Epidemic” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Apr 17, 2019 • 51 min
What role do visual media play in establishing a medical phenomenon? Who mobilizes these representations, and to what end? In Mapping AIDS: Visual Histories of an Enduring Epidemic (Cambridge UP, 2018), Lukas Engelmann uses AIDS atlases to show how…
Dilip Hiro, “Cold War in the Islamic World: Saudi Arabia, Iran and the Struggle for Supremacy” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Apr 16, 2019 • 68 min
In recent years, the concept of a ‘Cold War’ has been revived to describe the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran, the two most influential states occupying positions of geopolitical importance in the Persian Gulf, who lay claim to leadership over the…
Eliot Borenstein, “Plots Against Russia: Conspiracy and Fantasy after Socialism” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Apr 16, 2019 • 52 min
Since the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991, conspiratorial thinking has taken deep root in contemporary Russia, moving from the margins to the forefront of cultural, historical, and political discourse and fueled by centuries-long prejudices and new…
Pamela S. Nadell, “America’s Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today” (Norton, 2019)
Apr 16, 2019 • 53 min
Jewish women have consistently played a vital and significant role in American history more broadly, and American Jewish history specifically. Through a variety of different ways, from engaging in social activism, working outside the home, creating…
Margaret C. Jacob, “The Secular Enlightenment” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Apr 16, 2019 • 64 min
The Secular Enlightenment by Professor Margaret C. Jacob, has been called a major new history on how the Enlightenment transformed people’s everyday lives. It’s a panoramic account of the radical ways that life began to change for ordinary people in the…
Robert Matzen, “Dutch Girl: Audrey Hepburn and World War II” (GoodKnight Books, 2019)
Apr 16, 2019 • 58 min
Audrey Hepburn was justly known for her long acting career, yet her early life is largely unknown. In his book, Robert Matzen describes how she lived during the World War II period in Nazi-occupied Netherlands. Based on many interviews and other primary…
Margaret Leslie Davis , “The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year Odyssey” (TarcherPerigee, 2019)
Apr 15, 2019 • 61 min
Of the millions of books that have been published, few are as renowned or as coveted today by collectors as the famous Bible printed in the 15th century by Johannes Gutenberg. In The Lost Gutenberg: The Astounding Story of One Book’s Five-Hundred-Year…
Elizabeth Schmidt, “Foreign Intervention in Africa after the Cold War: Sovereignty, Responsibility, and the War on Terror” (Ohio UP, 2018)
Apr 15, 2019 • 60 min
Of all the blank spots in the mental maps of many Americans, Africa is one of the largest. Informed by a number of misconceptions and popular myths, knowledge of the continent’s complexity is poorly understood not just by ordinary citizens but by…
Christian Philip Peterson, “The Routledge History of World Peace Since 1750” (Routledge, 2018)
Apr 15, 2019 • 53 min
Christian Philip Peterson joins us today to talk about The Routledge History of World Peace since 1750 (Routledge, 2018), which he co-edited with William M. Knoblauch and Michael Loadenthal. The collection of essays examines the varied and multifaceted…
Craig Benjamin, “Empires of Ancient Eurasia: The First Silk Roads Era, 100 BCE-250 CE” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Apr 12, 2019 • 57 min
In the late second century BCE, a series of trading route developed between China in the east and Rome’s empire in the west. Craig Benjamin’s Empires of Ancient Eurasia: The First Silk Roads Era, 100 BCE-250 CE (Cambridge University Press, 2018) describes…
Lincoln A. Mitchell, “Baseball Goes West: The Dodgers, the Giants, and the Shaping of the Major Leagues”
Apr 11, 2019 • 78 min
Ask a Brooklynite over the age of fifty and they’ll likely tell you that baseball’s golden age ended the day the Dodgers and Giants packed up and headed for the West Coast. Not so argues Lincoln A. Mitchell in his new book, Baseball Goes West: The…
Shonaleeka Kaul, “The Making of Early Kashmir: Landscape and Identity in the Rajatarangini” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Apr 11, 2019 • 72 min
Dr. Shonaleeka Kaul is a cultural historian of early South Asia specializing in working with Sanskrit texts. She is Associate Professor at the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, and has worked extensively on Sanskrit kavya, a…
Jeremy Black, “Charting the Past: The Historical Worlds of Eighteenth-Century England” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Apr 11, 2019 • 30 min
Eighteenth-century England was a place of both the enlightenment and progress: new ideas abounded in science, politics, transportation, commerce, philosophy, religion, and the arts. But even as England propelled itself into the future, it was preoccupied…
Hennie van Vuuren, “Apartheid Guns and Money: A Tale of Profit” (Hurst, 2019)
Apr 10, 2019 • 44 min
In his new book, Apartheid Guns and Money: A Tale of Profit(Hurst, 2019), Hennie van Vuuren examines the final decades of the apartheid regime in South Africa. He weaves together archival material, interviews and newly declassified documents to expose…
Roger Robinson, “When Running Made History” (Syracuse UP, 2018)
Apr 10, 2019 • 61 min
“A race can mean more than a race,” Roger Robinson writes in his new book, When Running Made History. “It can show that human beings are still capable of attaining pure beauty through arduous endeavor.” Written as a personal history, elite runner and…
Mickey and Dick Flacks, “Making History/Making Blintzes: How Two Red Diaper Babies Found Each Other and Discovered America” (Rutgers UP, 2018)
Apr 10, 2019 • 81 min
Mickey and Dick Flacks’ new book Making History/Making Blintzes: How Two Red Diaper Babies Found Each Other and Discovered America (Rutgers UP, 2018) is a chronicle of the political and personal lives of progressive activists Richard (Dick) and Miriam…
Randall Stephens, “The Devil’s Music: How Christians Inspired, Condemned, and Embraced Rock n’ Roll” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Apr 10, 2019 • 55 min
I was immediately drawn to the book The Devil’s Music by Dr. Randall Stephens, Associate Professor of British and American Studies at the University of Oslo. Dr. Stephens and I came across one another online and the book, which combines part rock n’ roll…
Max Felker-Kantor, “Policing Los Angeles: Race, Resistance, and the Rise of the LAPD” (UNC Press, 2018)
Apr 9, 2019 • 78 min
In recent years, the treatment of African Americans by police departments around the country has come under increased public scrutiny. As any student of the longer historical relationship between law enforcement and people of color will know, this…
Patrick Sharma, “Robert McNamara’s Other War: The World Bank and International Development” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2017)
Apr 8, 2019 • 58 min
Robert McNamara is best remembered today for his momentous term as Secretary of Defense in the 1960s. Often overlooked because of this is his even longer tenure as president of the World Bank, one that reflected both the strengths and flaws of McNamara’s…
Sigrid Lien, “Pictures of Longing: Photography and the Norwegian-American Migration” (U Minnesota Press, 2018)
Apr 8, 2019 • 64 min
In one of history’s largest migrations, hundreds of thousands of Norwegians immigrated to North American during the 1800s and early 1900s. In addition to letters sent home, Norwegian-Americans often included photographs showcasing their new American…
Michael Desch, “Cult of the Irrelevant: The Waning Influence of Social Science on National Security (Princeton UP, 2019)
Apr 5, 2019 • 49 min
To mobilize America’s intellectual resources to meet the security challenges of the post–9/11 world, US Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates observed that “we must again embrace eggheads and ideas.” But the gap between national security policymakers and…
Leslie Hahner, “To Become an American: Immigrants and Americanization Campaigns of the Early 20th Century” (Michigan State UP, 2017)
Apr 5, 2019 • 57 min
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (she/they)—Assistant Professor, Dept. of Communication at SUNY Geneseo—interviews Dr. Leslie Hahner—Associate Professor, Dept. of Communication at Baylor University—on a spectacular new work of…
James O’Toole, “The Enlightened Capitalists: Cautionary Tales of Business Pioneers Who Tried to Do Well by Doing Good” (HarperBusiness, 2019)
Apr 5, 2019 • 51 min
Is the University of Chicago-blessed, “greed is good” near-term profits approach to business wearing out its welcome? James O’Toole’s The Enlightened Capitalists: Cautionary Tales of Business Pioneers Who Tried to Do Well by Doing Good(HarperBusiness,…
Christopher Herbert, “Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope” (U Washington Press, 2018)
Apr 4, 2019 • 68 min
Not all gold rushes are created equal, argues Christopher Herbert, Associate Professor of History at Columbia Basin College. Dr. Herbert’s new book, Gold Rush Manliness: Race and Gender on the Pacific Slope (University of Washington Press, 2018) is a…
Robert A. Voeks, “The Ethnobotany of Eden: Rethinking the Jungle Medicine Narrative” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Apr 4, 2019 • 48 min
Jungle medicine: it’s everywhere, from chia seeds to ginseng tea to CBD oil. In the US, what was once the province of counter culture has moved squarely into the mainstream of Walmart and Walgreens. In his excellent new book The Ethnobotany of Eden:…
Rósa Magnúsdóttir, “Enemy Number One: The United States of American in Soviet Ideology and Propaganda, 1945-1959” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Apr 4, 2019 • 64 min
In Enemy Number One: The United States of American in Soviet Ideology and Propaganda, 1945-1959 (Oxford University Press, 2019), Dr. Rósa Magnúsdóttir of Aarhus University, explores depictions of America in post-war Soviet propaganda. While the 1945…
Michael A. Schoeppner, “Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Apr 4, 2019 • 54 min
Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers. According to lawmakers, they carried a ‘moral contagion’ of abolitionism and black autonomy that could be transmitted to local slaves. Those seamen who…
Nancy Yunhwa Rao, “Chinatown Opera Theater in North America” (U Illinois Press, 2017)
Apr 3, 2019 • 58 min
The story of popular entertainment in American immigrant communities is only just beginning to be told. Chinatown Opera Theater in North America by Nancy Yunhwa Rao from University of Illinois Press (2017) addresses the history of Cantonese Opera…
Christian Goeschel, “Mussolini and Hitler: The Forging of the Fascist Alliance” (Yale UP, 2018)
Apr 2, 2019 • 65 min
In his new book, Mussolini and Hitler: The Forging of the Fascist Alliance (Yale University Press, 2018), Christian Goeschel, Senior Lecturer in Modern European History at the University of Manchester, examines the relationship between Hitler and…
Elena Schneider, ”The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade and Slavery in the Atlantic World” (UNC Press, 2018)
Apr 2, 2019 • 49 min
Histories of the British occupation of Havana in 1762 have focused on imperial rivalries and the actions and decisions of European planters, colonial officials, and military officers. In her stunning revision, The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade and…
Kathleen Burk, “The Lion and the Eagle: The Interaction of the British and American Empires, 1783-1972” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Apr 2, 2019 • 73 min
Throughout modern history, British and American rivalry has gone hand in hand with common interests. Now renown diplomatic historian Professor Kathleen Burk in her newest book, The Lion and the Eagle: The Interaction of the British and American Empires,…
Bhikkhu Anālayo, “Rebirth in Early Buddhism and Current Research” (Wisdom Publications, 2018)
Apr 1, 2019 • 43 min
In today’s podcast, I speak with German professor and Buddhist monk Bhikkhu Anālayo about his book Rebirth in Early Buddhism and Current Research (Wisdom Publications, 2018). Bhikkhu Anālayo skillfully analyzes the early Buddhist doctrine of rebirth…
Kathleen Keller, “Colonial Suspects: Suspicion, Imperial Rule, and Colonial Society in Interwar French West Africa” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Apr 1, 2019 • 61 min
Kathleen Keller’s new book, Colonial Suspects: Suspicion, Imperial Rule, and Colonial Society in Interwar French West Africa (University of Nebraska Press, 2018) is teeming with mysterious persons, foreigners, misfits, and the surveillance of numerous…
Bruce Van Orden, “We’ll Sing and We’ll Shout: The Life and Times of W. W. Phelps” (BYU, 2018)
Mar 29, 2019 • 80 min
If you’re a Latter Day Saint, you’ve probably heard of W. W. Phelps, and no doubt, you’ve probably sung some of his hymns. But did you know that he printed the Book of Commandments and other early church works? Or that he was one of the “council of…
Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, “They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South” (Yale UP, 2019)
Mar 29, 2019 • 60 min
Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. In her new book They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South…
Deborah E. Lipstadt, “Antisemitism: Here and Now” (Schocken, 2019)
Mar 28, 2019 • 53 min
Over the past decade, and especially in the last several years, anti-Semitic crimes have increased significantly. According to FBI Statistics, hate crimes against Jews in the US spiked 37% between 2016 and 2017. We are witnessing similar trends in Canada,…
Karen Ordahl Kupperman, “Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught Between Cultures in Early Virginia” (NYU Press, 2019)
Mar 27, 2019 • 53 min
In Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught Between Cultures in Early Virginia(New York University Press, 2019), Karen Ordahl Kupperman, Silver Professor of History Emerita at New York University, shifts the lens on the well-known narrative of Virginia’s…
Tom Wheeler, “From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future” (Brookings, 2019)
Mar 27, 2019 • 59 min
It’s easy to get sidetracked while writing a book. But imagine being interrupted by the President of the United States. That happened to Tom Wheeler, who was in the midst of writing a history of communication networks when President Obama appointed him to…
Brooke Newman, “A Dark Inheritance: Blood, Race, and Sex in Colonial Jamaica” (Yale UP, 2018)
Mar 27, 2019 • 65 min
In an empire built on racial slavery, what roles do blood purity and citizenship play in the creation of subject citizens? This is one of the many questions broached by Dr. Brooke Newman in her new book A Dark Inheritance: Blood, Race, and Sex in Colonial…
Kurt Raaflaub, “The Landmark Julius Caesar: The Complete Works” (Pantheon, 2017)
Mar 26, 2019 • 46 min
That the Roman leader Gaius Julius Caesar is so well remembered today for his achievements as a general is largely due to his skills as a writer. In The Landmark Julius Caesar: The Complete Works (Pantheon, 2017), the distinguished classics scholar Kurt…
Stéphane Henaut and Jeni Mitchell, “A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment” (The New Press, 2018)
Mar 25, 2019 • 55 min
From the cassoulet that won a war to the crêpe that doomed Napoleon, from the rebellions sparked by bread and salt to the new cuisines forged by empire, the history of France is intimately entwined with its gastronomic pursuits. A witty exploration of the…
Emma Hunter, “Political Thought and the Public Sphere in Tanzania” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Mar 22, 2019 • 52 min
Histories of African nationalism and decolonization have often assumed that political ideas such as freedom and democracy were imported into African colonies and helped motivate Africans to seek their independence. Through an insightful reading of Swahili…
Steve Luxenberg, “Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation” (Norton, 2019)
Mar 22, 2019 • 48 min
Steve Luxenberg has created an unusual history of the famous Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson and the 19th century’s segregationist practices in his book Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America’s Journey from Slavery to Segregation…
Joan Neuberger, “This Thing of Darkness: Eisenstein’s Ivan the Terrible in Stalin’s Russia” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Mar 21, 2019 • 55 min
Most of the time, this podcast focuses on the products of those who create historical fiction—specifically, novels. But what goes into producing a work of historical fiction—especially in a dictatorship where the wrong choice, or even the right choice at…
Alex Colas et al., “Food, Politics, and Society Social Theory and the Modern Food System” (U California Press, 2018)
Mar 20, 2019 • 47 min
The consumption of food and drink is much more than what we put in our mouth. Food and drink have been a focal point of modern social theory since the inception of agrarian capitalism and the industrial revolution. The origins of food and drink are rather…
Sheilagh Ogilvie, “The European Guilds: An Economic Analysis” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Mar 20, 2019 • 59 min
Guilds were prominent in medieval and early modern Europe, but their economic role has seldom been studied. In The European Guilds: An Economic Analysis (Princeton University Press, 2019), Sheilagh Ogilvie offers a wide-ranging examination of what guilds…
Margaret Arnold, “The Magdalene in the Reformation” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Mar 20, 2019 • 42 min
Mary Magdalene’s story of conversion from sinner to saint is one of Christianity’s most compelling and controversial stories. The identity of this woman, but more likely women, has been disputed since the early days of the Church, but her role as the…
Nathan McGovern, “The Snake and The Mongoose: The Emergence of Identity in Early Indian Religion” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Mar 19, 2019 • 54 min
The history of Indian religions in the centuries leading up to the common era has been characterized in the scholarship by two distinct overarching traditions: the Brahmans (associated with Vedic texts, caste, and Vedic rituals) and the renouncer…
Keith Gave, “The Russian Five: A Story of Espionage, Defection, Bribery and Courage” (Gold Star Publishing, 2018)
Mar 19, 2019 • 76 min
Keith Gave spent six years in the NSA during the Cold War, but his most daring mission may have come later, while working as a sports writer. In the late 1980s, Gave was asked by the Detroit Red Wings to reach behind the Iron Curtain and initiate contact…
Discussion of Massive Online Peer Review and Open Access Publishing
Mar 19, 2019 • 32 min
In the information age, knowledge is power. Hence, facilitating the access to knowledge to wider publics empowers citizens and makes societies more democratic. How can publishers and authors contribute to this process? This podcast addresses this issue.…
Kellie Carter Jackson, “Force and Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence” (U Penn Press, 2019)
Mar 18, 2019 • 58 min
What the United States dubs “freedom” is inherently tied to methods of violence. The United States’s abolitionist movement was not free from this connection. This is in spite of one of the best known white abolitionists, William Lloyd Garrison, being a…
David A. Nichols, “Peoples of the Inland Sea: Native Americans and Newcomers in the Great Lakes Region, 1600-1870” (Ohio UP, 2018)
Mar 18, 2019 • 40 min
Diverse in their languages and customs, the Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region—the Miamis, Ho-Chunks, Potawatomis, Ojibwas, and many others—shared a tumultuous history. In the colonial era their rich homeland became a target of imperial…
Andrew T. Fede, “Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and Atlantic World” (U Georgia Press, 2017)
Mar 18, 2019 • 56 min
Andrew T. Fede is a lawyer in private practice in northern New Jersey and an adjunct professor of law at Montclair State University. His new book Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and Atlantic World (University of…
S. M. Milkis and D. J. Tichenor, “Rivalry and Reform: Presidents, Social Movements, and the Transformation of American Politics” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Mar 18, 2019 • 28 min
Sidney M. Milkis and Daniel J. Tichenor have written Rivalry and Reform: Presidents, Social Movements, and the Transformation of American Politics (University of Chicago Press, 2019). Milkis is the White Burkett Miller Professor in the Department of…
Kent Blansett, “A Journey to Freedom: Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and Red Power” (Yale UP, 2018)
Mar 15, 2019 • 89 min
Richard Oakes was a natural born leader whom people followed seemingly on instinct. Thus when he dove into the icy San Francisco Bay in the fall of 1969 on his way to Alcatraz Island, he knew others would have his back. Kent Blansett tells Richard Oakes’…
César Brioso, “Last Seasons in Havana: The Castro Revolution and the End of Professional Baseball In Cuba” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
Mar 15, 2019 • 43 min
Today we are joined by César Brioso, author of the book Last Seasons in Havana: The Castro Revolution and the End of Professional Baseball In Cuba (University of Nebraska Press, 2019). Blending the love for baseball fans in Cuba had during the 1950s with…
Andrew Sobanet, “Generation Stalin: French Writers, the Fatherland, and the Cult of Personality” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Mar 14, 2019 • 57 min
In his 1924 biography of Mahatma Gandhi, writer Romain Rolland embraced the Gandhian philosophy of non-violence and decried the “dictators of Moscow” and the “idolatrous ideology of the Revolution.” Seven years later, in a startling reversal, Rolland…
Seth Bernard, “Building Mid-Republican Rome: Labor, Architecture, and the Urban Economy” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Mar 14, 2019 • 35 min
Building Mid-Republican Rome: Labor, Architecture, and the Urban Economy (Oxford University Press, 2018), offers a holistic treatment of the development of the Mid-Republican city from 396 to 168 BCE. As Romans established imperial control over Italy and…
Elizabeth Todd-Breland, “A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960s” (UNC Press, 2018)
Mar 14, 2019 • 66 min
Elizabeth Todd-Breland’s new book A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960s (University of North Carolina Press, 2018) tells the story of the struggle for educational reform in one of America’s biggest and most…
T. Troianowska and A. Polakowska, “Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture since 1918” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
Mar 14, 2019 • 42 min
Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture since 1918 (University of Toronto Press, 2018) consists of sixty essays written by authors from all over the world who specialize in Polish literature and culture. They write from a unique…
Prakash Shah, “Western Foundations of the Caste System” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
Mar 13, 2019 • 60 min
The Indian caste system is an ancient, pervasive institution of social organization within the subcontinent – or is it? Join me as I speak with Dr. Prakash Shah (Reader in Culture and Law at the Queen Mary University of London, UK) about his co-edited…
Ian Johnson, “The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao” (Pantheon, 2017)
Mar 13, 2019 • 73 min
Ian Johnson’s new book, The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao (Pantheon, 2017), was called “a masterpiece of observation and empathy” by The New York Review of Books, and The Economist, who included the book on its Best of 2017 list, said…
Richard Drake, “Charles Austin Beard: The Return of the Master Historian of American Imperialism” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Mar 12, 2019 • 53 min
During the first half of the 20th century the American historian Charles Austin Beard enjoyed both professional success and a national prominence that suffered with his outspoken opposition to the direction of foreign policy under Franklin Roosevelt. In…
Nico Slate, “Lord Cornwallis is Dead: The Struggle for Democracy in the United States and India” (Harvard UP, 2019)
Mar 12, 2019 • 54 min
In the twenty-first century, India and the United States are two closely connected states. Some of this is economic, and with it comes a concern that jobs in the United States are being outsourced to India. The two countries also face concerns over…
Martha S. Jones, “Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Mar 11, 2019 • 54 min
Martha S. Jones, in her excellent new book Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America(Cambridge University Press, 2018), weaves together the legal and constitutional dimensions of citizenship—from the Founding documents and…
Whitney G. Gamble, “Christ and the Law: Antinomianism at the Westminster Assembly” (Reformation Heritage Books, 2018)
Mar 11, 2019 • 36 min
The Westminster Assembly (1643-53) was one of the most important ecclesiastical councils in the history of Reformed Protestantism, but until very recently it had received little in the way of scholarly attention. With the rediscovery of the minutes of the…
Sayaka Chatani, “Nation-Empire: Ideology and Rural Youth Mobilization in Japan and Its Colonies” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Mar 11, 2019 • 37 min
Sayaka Chatani’s Nation-Empire: Ideology and Rural Youth Mobilization in Japan and Its Colonies (Cornell University Press, 2018) tackles the fraught question of how and why young men in marginalized and rural areas of Japan and its colonies became…
Jennifer Ronyak, “Intimacy, Performance, and the Lied in the Early Nineteenth Century” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Mar 8, 2019 • 50 min
The Lied is one of the most important genres of nineteenth-century Romantic music, and one of the most intriguing. Balanced between public and private performance, an expression of both poetic and musical meaning, musicologists have tended to study Lieder…
Darren Barany, “The New Welfare Consensus: Ideological, Political and Social Origins” (SUNY Press, 2018)
Mar 8, 2019 • 35 min
The 1996 repeal of Aid to Families with Dependent Children — the New Deal-era relief program for poor women with children — was a seminal moment in the modern history of the US welfare state. That the charge was led by a Democratic president makes it even…
Emily Baum, “The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Mar 8, 2019 • 66 min
Emily Baum’s The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China, published by the University of Chicago Press in 2018 as part of the Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute book series, is a genealogy of “psychiatric…
Daniel Immerwahr, “How to Hide an Empire: The History of the Greater United States” (FSG, 2019)
Mar 7, 2019 • 78 min
“Is America an Empire?” is a popular question for pundits and historians, likely because it sets off such a provocative debate. All too often, however, people use empire simply because the United States is a hegemon, ignoring the country’s imperial traits…
Christine Loh, “Underground Front: The Chinese Communist Party in Hong Kong” (Hong Kong UP, 2018)
Mar 7, 2019 • 58 min
There can be little doubt that Hong Kong has stood out as a particularly intense East Asian news hotspot in recent years. Whether reports have focused on pro-democracy protests, abducted booksellers or PRC Mainland integration plans, most of this news has…
Scott Mobley, “Progressives in Navy Blue: Maritime Strategy, American Empire, and the Transformation of U.S. Naval Identity, 1873-1898” (Naval Institute Press, 2018)
Mar 6, 2019 • 65 min
This episode of the New Books in Military History podcast is something of a sea change, so to speak, as we turn our attention to naval policy and strategy. Institutional reform is a well-established topic in studies of the ground and air forces of the…
Joyce Antler, “Jewish Radical Feminism: Voices from the Women’s Liberation Movement” (NYU Press, 2018)
Mar 6, 2019 • 51 min
Joyce Antler is the Samuel J. Lane Professor Emerita of American Jewish history and culture at Brandeis University. Jewish Radical Feminism: Voices from the Women’s Liberation Movement (New York University Press, 2018) provides richly detailed biographies…
James Schwoch, “Wired into Nature: The Telegraph and the North American Frontier” (U Illinois Press, 2018)
Mar 6, 2019 • 50 min
It’s been called the first Internet. In the nineteenth century, the telegraph spun a world wide web of cables and poles, carrying electronic signals with unprecedented speed. In order to connect the entire American continent, however, the telegraph had to…
Margaret Hennefeld, “Specters of Slapstick and Silent Film Comediennes” (Columbia UP, 2018)
Mar 5, 2019 • 70 min
In the early days of film, female comedians appeared in films that included both strange activities and slapstick. In her new book Specters of Slapstick and Silent Film Comediennes (Columbia University Press, 2018), Margaret Hennefeld, Assistant Professor…
Trent MacNamara, “Birth Control and American Modernity: A History of Popular Ideas” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Mar 4, 2019 • 52 min
Birth control, and the access to it, has continued to be a divisive issue in American political and social life. While birth control has almost become shorthand for “the pill,” a wide range of birth control methods have been in the American lexicon for…
Alexander Langlands, “Cræft: An Inquiry into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts” (Norton, 2017)
Mar 4, 2019 • 57 min
Alexander Langlands is a British archaeologist, historian, writer, and broadcaster. His most recent book, Cræft: An Inquiry into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts, was published by Norton to great acclaim in 2017 and has just been…
Chet Van Duzer, “Henricus Martellus’s World Map at Yale (c. 1491): Multispectral Imaging, Sources, and Influence” (Springer, 2019)
Mar 1, 2019 • 61 min
Chet Van Duzer, an accomplished historian of cartography, trains his sight in this book on one uniquely important map produced in early modern Europe. The 1491 world map by Henricus Martellus has long been deemed “an essentially unstudiable object,” its…
Ronald L. Lewis and Robert L. Zangrando, “Walter F. White: The NAACP’s Ambassador for Racial Justice” (West Virginia UP, 2019)
Mar 1, 2019 • 81 min
Though overshadowed today by more celebrated figures, Walter Francis White was one of the most prominent campaigners for civil rights in mid-20th-century America. As Ronald L. Lewis and Robert L. Zangrando detail in Walter F. White: The NAACP’s Ambassador…
Matthew Bowman, “Christian: The Politics of a Word in America” (Harvard UP, 2018)
Feb 28, 2019 • 61 min
The intersection of religion and politics in the United States is one of the nation’s most enduring conversations. Christian: The Politics of a Word in America(Harvard University Press, 2018) by Dr. Matthew Bowman at Henderson State University, was…
Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen, “The Ideas that Made America: A Brief History” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Feb 28, 2019 • 64 min
Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen’s The Ideas that Made America: A Brief History (Oxford University Press, 2019) is a sweeping examination of the key ideas that have infused American society. Moving across borders, time, and within American culture the author…
S. A. Duncan and A. McClellan, “The Art of Curating: Paul J. Sachs and the Museum Course at Harvard” (Getty Research Institute, 2018)
Feb 27, 2019 • 63 min
Andrew McClellan and Sally Anne Duncan’s book offers a behind-the-scenes exploration of the career of Paul J. Sachs (1878-1965) and the graduate program he developed at Harvard University and the Fogg Museum that came to be known as the “museum course.”…
Geraldine Heng, “The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Feb 26, 2019 • 61 min
In The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages (Cambridge University Press 2018), Geraldine Heng collects a remarkable array of medieval approaches to race that show the breadth and depth of the kinds of racial thinking in medieval society. In…
Christopher Goscha, “Vietnam: A New History” (Basic Books, 2016)
Feb 26, 2019 • 42 min
More than forty year after its end the Vietnam War casts a long shadow over our understanding of Vietnam’s modern history. But the acute focus on the war has perhaps distorted our understanding of modern Vietnam. Christopher Goscha’s award-winning new…
Susan Thomson, “Rwanda: From Genocide to Precarious Peace” (Yale UP, 2018)
Feb 25, 2019 • 59 min
How do you put Humpty-Dumpty back together again? Susan Thomson’s new book Rwanda: From Genocide to Precarious Peace (Yale University Press, 2018) examines the postwar history of Rwanda to consider the ways the Rwandan genocide shaped governance, policy…
Adrienne Brown, “The Black Skyscraper: Architecture and the Perception of Race” (John Hopkins UP, 2017)
Feb 25, 2019 • 77 min
Adrienne Brown joins the New Books Network this week to talk about her fascinating 2017 book, The Black Skyscraper: Architecture and the Perception of Race (John Hopkins University Press, 2017), which was a recent recipient of the Modern Studies…
Catherine Baker, “Race and the Yugoslav Region: Postsocialist, Post-Conflict, Postcolonial?” (Manchester UP, 2018)
Feb 21, 2019 • 64 min
Catherine Baker’s fascinating new book poses a deceptively simple question: what does race have to do with the Yugoslav region? Eastern European studies has often framed the region as unimplicated in global formations of race, while still remarking on the…
Adriaan C. Neele, “Before Jonathan Edwards: Sources of New England Theology” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Feb 20, 2019 • 37 min
Jonathan Edwards is by now widely recognised as America’s most important early philosopher and theologian. Much of the scholarship that exegetes his work is content to see it as something innovative, and closely linked to the emerging contexts of…
Kendall Phillips, “A Place of Darkness: The Rhetoric of Horror in Early American Cinema” (U Texas, 2018)
Feb 20, 2019 • 55 min
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (she/they) interviews Dr. Kendall Phillips (he) of Syracuse University on his fabulous new book A Place of Darkness: The Rhetoric of Horror in Early American Cinema (University of Texas, 2018). In it,…
Janne Lahti, “The American West and the World: Transnational and Comparative Perspectives” (Routledge, 2019)
Feb 20, 2019 • 55 min
One of the enduring questions in American historiography is: just where exactly is the West? In The American West and the World: Transnational and Comparative Perspectives (Routledge, 2019), Dr. Janne Lahti argues compellingly that the West is a place on…
Joy Lisi Rankin, “A People’s History of Computing in the United States” (Harvard UP, 2018).
Feb 19, 2019 • 40 min
We know, perhaps too well, the innovation-centric history of personal computing. Yet, computer users were not necessarily microelectronics consumers from the get-go; rather, earlier efforts to expand mainframe computing as a public utility made elite…
Daniel Unowsky, “The Plunder: The 1898 Anti-Jewish Riots in Habsburg Galicia” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Feb 19, 2019 • 62 min
Daniel Unowsky’s book isn’t about a genocide or other incident of mass violence. Instead, The Plunder examines a series of riots against Jews in Habsburg Galicia in the year 1898. Unowsky tries to understand how, in an Empire built around the idea of the…