The Bowery Boys: New York City History

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

www.boweryboyshistory.com
A fresh look at the history and culture of New York City
#226 The Beauty Bosses of Fifth Avenue
Apr 13 • 51 min
The Midtown Manhattan stretch of Fifth Avenue, once known for its ensemble of extravagant mansions owned by the Gilded Age’s wealthiest families, went through an astonishing makeover one hundred years ago. Many lavish abodes of the rich…
#225 P. T. Barnum and the Greatest Show on Earth
Mar 30 • 58 min
Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls of all ages — the Bowery Boys present to you the tale of P. T. Barnum and his “Greatest Show on Earth,” the world’s most famous circus! You can’t even bring up the discussion of circuses without mentioning…
#224 The Arrival of the Irish: An Immigrant Story
Mar 16 • 57 min
You don’t have a New York City without the Irish. In fact, you don’t have a United States of America as we know it today. This diverse and misunderstood immigrant group began coming over in significant numbers starting in the Colonial era, mostly as…
#223 The Algonquin Round Table
Mar 2 • 64 min
One June afternoon in the spring of 1919, a group of writers and theatrical folk got together at the Algonquin Hotel to roast the inimitable Alexander Woollcott, the trenchant theater critic for the New York Times who had just returned from World War…
#222 Who Killed Helen Jewett? A Mystery By Gaslight
Feb 16 • 53 min
In the spring of 1836, a young woman named Helen Jewett was brutally murdered with a hatchet in a townhouse on Thomas Street, just a few blocks northwest from City Hall. This was not a normal crime. Helen was a prostitute of great…
#221 New York: Capital City of the United States
Feb 2 • 53 min
During a handful of months in 1789 and 1790, representatives of the new nation of the United States came together in New York City to make decisions which would forever affect the lives of Americans. In this second part of our…
#220 George Washington’s New York Inauguration
Jan 19 • 56 min
The story of New York City’s role in the birth of American government is sometimes forgotten. Most of the buildings important to the first U.S. Congress, which met here from the spring of 1789 to the late summer of 1790, have long been demolished….
#219 Newsies on Strike!
Dec 23, 2016 • 54 min
We’re in the mood for a good old-fashioned Gilded Age story so we’re replaying one of our favorite Bowery Boys episodes ever — Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst vs. the newsies! It was pandemonium in the streets. One hot summer in July…
#218 Lincoln Center and West Side Story
Dec 8, 2016 • 59 min
Warm up the orchestra, lace up your dance slippers, and bring the diva to the stage! For our latest show we’re telling the origin story of Lincoln Center, the fine arts campus which assembles some of the city’s finest music and theatrical…
#217: Truman Capote’s Black And White Ball
Nov 23, 2016 • 54 min
Truman Capote is a true New York character, a Southern boy who wielded his immense writing talents to secure a place within Manhattan high society. Elegant, witty, compact, gay — Capote was a fixture of swanky nightclubs and arm candy to wealthy,…
#216: Edwin Booth and the Players Club
Nov 10, 2016 • 58 min
Edwin Booth was the greatest actor of the Gilded Age, a superstar of the theater who entertained millions over his long career. In this podcast, we present his extraordinary career, the tragedies that shaped his life (on stage and off), and the legacy…
01 The Wheel: Ferris’ Big Idea (‘The First’ Podcast Special Preview)
Oct 27, 2016 • 50 min
01: The first Ferris Wheel was invented to become America’s Eiffel Tower, making its grand debut at the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893. The wheel’s inventor George Washington Gale Ferris was a clever and optimistic soul; he did everything in his…
#215 Ghosts of the Gilded Age
Oct 13, 2016 • 65 min
For this year’s 10th annual Bowery Boys Halloween special, we’re highlighting haunted tales from the period just after the Civil War when New York City became one of the richest cities in the world — rich in wealth and in ghosts! We go to four…
#214 Bronx Trilogy (Part Three) The Bronx Was Burning
Sep 29, 2016 • 60 min
The Bronx was burning. The Bronx is now rising. In the third and final part of our Bronx history series, we tackle the most difficult period in the life of this borough — the late 20th century and the days and nights of urban blight. The focus of…
#213 Bronx Trilogy (Part Two) The Bronx is Building
Sep 15, 2016 • 59 min
In the second part of the Bowery Boys’ Bronx Trilogy — recounting the entire history of New York City’s northernmost borough — we focus on the years between 1875 and 1945, a time of great evolution and growth for the former pastoral areas of…
#212 Bronx Trilogy (Part One) The Bronx Is Born
Sep 1, 2016 • 57 min
The story of the Bronx is so large, so spectacular, that we had to spread it out over three separate podcasts! In Part One — The Bronx Is Born — we look at the land that is today’s borough, back when it was a part of Westchester County, a…
#211 The Notorious Madame Restell: The Abortionist of Fifth Avenue
Aug 18, 2016 • 53 min
Ann Lohman, aka Madame Restell, was one of the most vilified women of the 19th century, an abortion practitioner that dodged the law to become one of the wealthiest self-made women in the Gilded Age. But is her reputation justified? Thoughts on…
#210 Digital City: New York and the World of Video Games
Aug 4, 2016 • 56 min
New York has an interesting, complex and downright weird relationship with video games, from the digital sewers below Manhattan to the neon-lit arcades of Times Square. In this grab bag episode – filled with nostalgia and nerdyness…
#209 The Waldorf-Astoria’s Complicated History
Jul 21, 2016 • 53 min
You might think you know this tale, but do we have surprises for you. The Waldorf-Astoria — or the Waldorf=Astoria or even the Waldorf Astoria — has been a premier name in hotel accommodations since the opening of the very first edition on 34th…
#208 Great Hoaxes of Old New York
Jul 7, 2016 • 51 min
New Yorkers can be tough to crack, maneuvering through a rapidly changing, fast-paced city. But they can, at times, also be easily fooled. In this episode, we explore two of the wackiest stories in early New York City history, two instances of…
#207 The First Subway: Beach’s Pneumatic Marvel
Jun 23, 2016 • 54 min
The first subway in New York — the first in the United States! – travelled only a single block and failed to influence the future of transportation. And yet Alfred Ely Beach’s marvelous pneumatic transit system provides us today with one of the…
#206 The Lenape: The Real Native New Yorkers
Jun 9, 2016 • 55 min
Before New York, before New Amsterdam – there was Lenapehoking, the land of the Lenape, the original inhabitants of the places we call Manhattan, Westchester, northern New Jersey and western Long Island. This is the story of their first…
#205 The Disappearance of Dorothy Arnold
May 26, 2016 • 47 min
The young socialite Dorothy Arnold seemingly led a charmed and privileged life. The niece of a Supreme Court justice, Dorothy was the belle of 1900s New York, an attractive and vibrant young woman living on the Upper East Side with her family. She…
#204 The Cotton Club: The Aristocrat of Harlem
May 12, 2016 • 37 min
The Cotton Club, Harlem’s most prominent nightclub during the Prohibiton era, delivered some of the greatest music legends of the Jazz Age — Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Fletcher Henderson, Ethel Waters, the Nicolas Brothers….
#203 Nikola Tesla in New York
Apr 28, 2016 • 50 min
The Serbian immigrant Nikola Tesla was among the Gilded Age’s brightest minds, a visionary thinker and inventor who gave the world innovations in electricity, radio and wireless communication. So why has Tesla garnered the mantle of cult status among…
#202 The Lower East Side: A Culinary History
Apr 15, 2016 • 58 min
Join us as we experience the tastes of another era by visiting some of the oldest culinary institutions of the Lower East Side. From McSorley’s to Katz’s, Russ & Daughters and Economy Candy — when did these shops open, who did they serve, and…
#201 GOWANUS! Brooklyn’s Troubled Waters
Apr 1, 2016 • 59 min
This is the dirtiest Bowery Boys podcast ever. Literally. Brooklyn’s Gowanus — both the creek and the canal — is one of the most mysterious and historically important waterways in New York City. By coincidence, it also happens to be among…
#200 Jane Jacobs: Saving the Village
Mar 18, 2016 • 64 min
Washington Square Park torn in two. The West Village erased and re-written. Soho, Little Italy and the Lower East Side ripped asunder by an elevated highway. This is what would have happened in New York City in the 1950s and 60s if not for…
#199.5: Bowery Boys - Behind the Scenes
Mar 8, 2016 • 42 min
As we prepare for our #200th episode — and the release of the first-ever Bowery Boys book — we’ve decided to take a look back at our last 100 shows, at some of the highlights of the past six or so years. What were some of our favorite…
#199 Battle For The Skyline: How High Can It Go?
Feb 19, 2016 • 57 min
This year is the one hundred anniversary of one of the most important laws ever passed in New York City — the 1916 Zoning Law which dictated the rules for building big and tall in the city. So we thought we’d take this opportunity to ponder on the…
#198 Greenpoint, Brooklyn: An Industrial-Strength History
Feb 5, 2016 • 56 min
Greenpoint, Brooklyn, has a surprising history of bucolic green pastures and rancid oil patches. Before the 19th century this corner of Brooklyn was owned by only a few families with farms (and slaves tending them). But with the future borough of…
#197 Danger In The Harbor: The Black Tom Explosion of 1916
Jan 21, 2016 • 48 min
On July 30, 1916, at just after 2 in the morning, a massive explosion ripped apart the island of Black Tom on the shoreline near Jersey City, sending a shockwave through the region and thousands of pounds of wartime shrapnel into the neighboring…
#196 Ready to Wear: A History of the Garment District
Jan 8, 2016 • 54 min
The Garment District in Midtown Manhattan has been the center for all things American fashion for almost one hundred years. The lofts and office buildings here still buzz with industry of making clothing — from design to distribution. New…
#195 Midnight in Times Square: New Year’s Eve in New York City
Dec 10, 2015 • 52 min
In this episode, we look back on the one day of the year that New Yorkers look forward. New Years Eve is the one night that millions of people around the world focus their attentions on New York City — or more specifically, on the wedge shaped…
#194 Nellie Bly: Undercover in the Madhouse
Nov 12, 2015 • 57 min
Nellie Bly was a determined and fearless journalist ahead of her time, known for the spectacular lengths she would go to get a good story. Her reputation was built on the events of late September-early October 1887 — the ten days she spent in an…
#193 St. Mark’s Place: Party in the East Village!
Oct 29, 2015 • 52 min
St. Mark’s Place may be named for a saint but it’s been a street full of sinners for much of its history. One of the most fascinating streets in the city, St. Mark’s traces its story back to Peter Stuyvesant, meets up with the wife of Alexander…
#192 Haunted Landmarks of New York
Oct 15, 2015 • 57 min
Don’t be frightened! It’s the ninth annual Bowery Boys ghost stories podcast. We’re here to guide you through the back alleys … OF TERROR! In this installment, we take a look at the spectral lore behind some of New York City’s most famous…
#191 The Great Fire of 1776
Oct 1, 2015 • 52 min
A little after midnight on September 21, 1776, the Fighting Cocks Tavern on Whitehall Street caught on fire. The drunken revelers inside the tavern were unable to stop the blaze, and it soon raged into a dangerous inferno, spreading up the west side…
#190 The Curious Case of Typhoid Mary
Sep 17, 2015 • 52 min
The gripping and startling tale of Typhoid Mary is a harrowing detective story and a chilling tale of disease and death. Why are whole healthy families suddenly getting sick with typhoid fever — from the languid mansions of Long Island’s Gold…
#189 TAXI: History of the New York City taxicab
Sep 3, 2015 • 59 min
In this episode, we recount almost 175 years of getting around New York in a private ride. The hansom, the romantic rendition of the horse and carriage, took New Yorkers around during the Gilded Age. But unregulated conduct by…
#188: The Murder of Stanford White
Aug 6, 2015 • 54 min
On the evening of June 25, 1906, during a performance of Mam’zelle Champagne on the rooftop of Madison Square Garden, the architect Stanford White was brutally murdered by Harry Kendall Thaw. The renown of White’s professional career — he was one of…
#187: Super City: New York and the History of Comic Books
Jul 23, 2015 • 53 min
In the 1890s a newspaper rivalry between William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer helped bring about the birth of the comic strip and, a few decades later, the comic book. Today, comic book superheroes are bigger than ever…
#186 Hell’s Kitchen: New York’s Wild West
Jul 9, 2015 • 52 min
Hell’s Kitchen, on the far west side of Midtown Manhattan, is a neighborhood of many secrets. The unique history of this working class district veers into many tales of New York’s criminal underworld and violent riots which have shaken the…
#185 Adventures on Governors Island
Jun 25, 2015 • 60 min
What can you find on Governors Island? Almost 400 years of action-packed history! This island in New York Harbor has been at the heart of the city’s defense since the days of the Revolutionary War, and its story takes us back to the very…
#184 The Flatiron Building: A Story from Three Sides
Jun 11, 2015 • 53 min
For our 8th anniversary episode, we’re revisiting one of New York City’s great treasures and a true architectural oddity — the Flatiron Building. When they built this structure at the corner of Madison Square Park (and completed in 1902),…
#183 Orchard Street: Life in the Lower East Side
May 29, 2015 • 60 min
The Lower East Side is one of the most important neighborhoods in America, with a rich history as dense as its former living quarters. Thousands of immigrants experienced American life on these many crowded streets. In this podcast, we look at…
#182 Mae West, “Sex” on Broadway
May 15, 2015 • 54 min
Mae West (star of I’m No Angel and She Done Him Wrong) would come to revolutionize the idea of American sexuality, challenging and lampooning ideas of femininity while wielding a suggestive and vicious wit. But before she was America’s diamond girl,…
#181 Park Slope and the Story of Brownstone Brooklyn
May 1, 2015 • 60 min
Park Slope – or simply the park slope, as they used to say – is best known for its spectacular Victorian-era mansions and brownstones, one of the most romantic neighborhoods in all of Brooklyn. It’s also a leading example of…
#180 The Chelsea Piers and the Age of the Ocean Liner
Apr 16, 2015 • 52 min
The Chelsea Piers were once New York City’s portal to the world, a series of long docks along the west side of Manhattan that accommodated some of the most luxurious ocean liners of the early 20th century. Passenger ocean travel became…
#179 The Fight for Bryant Park
Apr 2, 2015 • 51 min
In our last show, we left the space that would become Bryant Park as a disaster area; its former inhabitant, the old Crystal Palace, had tragically burned to the ground in 1858. The area was called Reservoir Square for its…
#178: The Crystal Palace: America’s First World’s Fair
Mar 19, 2015 • 48 min
New York’s Crystal Palace seems like something out of a dream, a shimmering and spectacular glass-and-steel structure — a gigantic greenhouse — which sat in the area of today’s Bryant Park. In 1853 this was the home to the Exhibition of the Industry…
#177 The Big History of Little Italy
Feb 20, 2015 • 53 min
Little Italy is the pocket-neighborhood reminder of the great wave of Italian immigration which came through New York City starting in the late 1870s. This was the home of a densely packed, lively neighborhood of pushcarts, cheese shops,…
#176 Billie Holiday’s New York
Jan 23, 2015 • 38 min
Grab your fedora and take a trip with the Bowery Boys into the heart of New York City’s jazz scene — late nights, smoky bars, neon signs — through the eyes of one of the greatest American vocalists who ever lived here — Billie…
#175 Bowery Boys 2014 Year In Review
Dec 25, 2014 • 52 min
When historians look back at the year 2014, what events or cultural changes within New York City will historians consider significant? In this special episode, the Bowery Boys look back at some of the biggest historical headlines of…
#174 American Kicks: A History of the Rockettes
Dec 11, 2014 • 51 min
The Radio City Rockettes are perhaps America’s best known dance troupe — and a staple of the holiday season — but you may not know the origin of this most iconic of New York City symbols. For one, they’re not even from the Big…
#173 Ruins of the World’s Fair: New York State Pavilion
Nov 13, 2014 • 58 min
The ruins of the New York State Pavilion, highlight of the 1964-65 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, have become a kind of unofficial Statue of Liberty of Queens, greeting people as they head to and from LaGuardia and JFK airports….
#172 Ghost Stories of Brooklyn
Oct 15, 2014 • 50 min
Brooklyn is the setting for this quartet of classic ghost stories, all set before the independent city was an official borough of New York City. This is a Brooklyn of old stately mansions and farms, with railroad tracks laid through forests and…
#171 The Keys to Gramercy Park
Sep 18, 2014 • 54 min
Gramercy Park is Manhattan’s only private park, a prohibited place for most New Yorkers. However we have your keys to the history of this significant and rather unusual place, full of the city’s greatest inventors, civic leaders and…
#170 The Life and Death of Rudolph Valentino
Aug 21, 2014 • 49 min
Rudolph Valentino was an star from the early years of Hollywood, but his elegant, randy years in New York City should not be forgotten. They helped make him a premier dancer and a glamorous actor. And on August 23, 1926, this is where…
#169 The Tallest Building In New York: A Short History
Aug 6, 2014 • 33 min
One World Trade Center was declared last year the tallest building in America, but it’s a very different structure from the other skyscrapers who have once held that title. In New York, owning the tallest building has often been like possessing a…
#168 DUEL! Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton
Jul 10, 2014 • 29 min
Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr met at a clearing in Weehawken, NJ, in the early morning on July 11, 1804, to mount the most famous duel in American history. But why? This is the story of two New York lawyers — and two Founding Fathers —…
#167 Cleopatra’s Needle and the Freemasons Secret
Jun 26, 2014 • 49 min
Cleopatra’s Needle is the name given to the ancient Egyptian obelisk that sits in Central Park, right behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This is the bizarre tale of how it arrived in New York and the unusual forces that went behind its…
#166 General Slocum Disaster 1904
Jun 12, 2014 • 27 min
On June 15, 1904, hundreds of residents of the Lower East Side’s thriving German community boarded the General Slocum excursion steamer to enjoy a day trip outside the city. Most of them would never return home. The General Slocum disaster is,…
#165 Ladies’ Mile
May 30, 2014 • 49 min
Ladies’ Mile — the most famous New York shopping district in the 19th century and the “heart of the Gilded Age,” a district of spectacular commercial palaces of cast-iron. They are some of the city’s greatest buildings, designed by premier…
#164 The Astor Place Riot
May 1, 2014 • 50 min
England’s great thespian William Macready mounted the stage of the Astor Place Opera House on May 10, 1849, to perform Shakespeare’s Macbeth, just as he had done hundreds of times before. But this performance would become infamous in later years…
#163 South Street Seaport
Apr 3, 2014 • 49 min
The glory of early New York City came from its role as one of the world’s great ports. Today the South Street Seaport is a lasting tribute to that seafaring heritage, a historical district beneath the Brooklyn Bridge that contains some…
#162 George Washington Bridge
Mar 7, 2014 • 48 min
The George Washington Bridge is surprisingly graceful, but politically scandalous. And we’re not talking about the current crisis being faced by current New Jersey governor Chris Christie. Figuring out a way to cross over the…
#161 Fire Department of New York (FDNY)
Feb 6, 2014 • 45 min
The New York Fire Department protects the five boroughs from a host of disasters and mishaps — five-alarm blazes, a kitchen fire run amok, and even those dastardly midtown elevators, always getting stuck! But today’s tightly organized team is a…
#160 Tompkins Square Park
Jan 10, 2014 • 48 min
Central Park has frequently been called ‘the people’s park,” but we think Tompkins Square Park may have a better claim to that title. From its inception, this East Village recreational spot — named for Vice President Daniel D Tompkins…
#159 The Broadway Musical: Setting the Stage
Dec 12, 2013 • 58 min
The Broadway Musical is one of New York City’s greatest inventions, 150 years in the making! It’s one of the truly American art forms, fueling one of the city’s most vibrant entertainment businesses and defining its most popular tourist attraction —…
#158 Hotel Theresa: The Waldorf of Harlem
Nov 14, 2013 • 23 min
The Hotel Theresa is considered a genuine (if under-appreciated) Harlem treasure, both for its unique architecture and its special place in history as the hub for African-American life in the 1940s and 50s. The luxurious apartment hotel was built by a…
#157 Early Ghost Stories of Old New York
Oct 17, 2013 • 57 min
This is the Bowery Boys 7th annual Halloween podcast, with four new scary stories to chill your bones and keep you up at night, generally doused with strange and fascinating facts about New York City. For this episode, we’ve decided to go truly…
#156 The Boy Mayor of New York
Sep 19, 2013 • 44 min
As New York City enters the final stages of this year’s mayoral election, let’s look back on a decidedly more unusual contest 100 years ago, pitting Tammany Hall and their estranged ally (Mayor William Jay Gaynor) up against a…
#155 Sesame Street to Seinfeld: NYC TV 1969-2013
Aug 22, 2013 • 22 min
In the third part of the Bowery Boys Summer TV Mini-Series, I give you a grand tour of the New York City television production world from the 1970s to today, from the debut of Sesame Street in the Upper West Side to the flourishing 1990s, where the…
#154 New York in the Golden Age of Television
Aug 2, 2013 • 53 min
It’s the second part of the Bowery Boys TV Mini-Series, covering the years of New York City television production from the late 1940s to the 1960s. This podcast is arranged a little bit like a leisurely Midtown walking tour, taking you past four of…
#153 NYC and the Birth of Television
Jun 28, 2013 • 51 min
It’s the beginning of The Bowery Boys Summer TV Mini-Series, three podcasts devoted to New York City’s illustrious history with broadcast television — from Sarnoff to Seinfeld! In our first show, we go back to the start of the invention of the…
#152 Bellevue Hospital
May 30, 2013 • 45 min
Bellevue Hospital, you might have heard, once had a very notorious psychiatric ward. But those horror stories have only distracted from the rather breathtaking — and heart-breaking — history of this historic institution, a lifeline not only…
#151 The Limelight: Church, Nightclub and Mall
May 2, 2013 • 44 min
If you had told 1840s religious leader William Muhlenberg that his innovative new Church of the Holy Communion, designed by renown architect Richard Upjohn, would become the glittering seat of drugs and debauchery 150 years later, he might have burned…
#150 Consolidation! Five Boroughs, One Big City
Apr 5, 2013 • 55 min
Here’s the story of how two very big cities and a whole bunch of small towns and villages — completely different in nature, from farmland to skyscraper — became the greatest city in the world. This is the tale of Greater New York, the forming of the…
#149 John Peter Zenger and the Power of the Press
Mar 7, 2013 • 48 min
A long, long time ago in New York — in the 1730s, back when the city was a holding of the British, with a little over 10,000 inhabitants — a German printer named John Peter Zenger decided to print a four-page newspaper called the New York Weekly…
#148 The Great Blizzard of 1888
Feb 7, 2013 • 48 min
This year is the 125th anniversary of one of the worst storms to ever wreck havoc upon New York City, the now-legendary mix of wind and snow called the Great Blizzard of 1888. Its memory was again conjured up a few months ago as people struggled…
#147 Art Insanity: The Armory Show of 1913
Jan 11, 2013 • 25 min
The Armory Show of 1913 was the mainstream debut of modernist art — both European and American — to New York City audiences. Galleries had previously devoted themselves to the great European masters, antiquity and American landscapes as a way to…
#146 Herald Square
Dec 14, 2012 • 54 min
Welcome to the secret history of Herald Square, New York City’s second favorite intersection — after Times Square, of course, just a few blocks north. But we think you may find this intersection at 34th Street, Sixth Avenue and Broadway perhaps even…
#145 Bicycle Mania! From Velocipede to Ten-Speed
Nov 15, 2012 • 20 min
The bicycle has always seemed like a slightly awkward form of transportation in big cities, but in fact, it’s reliable, convenient, clean and — believe it or not — popular in New York City for almost 200 years. The original two-wheeled conveyance…
Hurricane Sandy Update
Nov 2, 2012 • 16 min
A brief snapshot into what’s happening in the city as of Friday afternoon, November 2, reviewing some of the events associated with Hurricane Sandy, the catastrophic storm which hit the Northeast this week. Featuring some of the historical context for…
#144 Mysteries and Magicians of New York
Oct 18, 2012 • 54 min
Our sixth annual ghost story podcast takes a little twist this time around. Oh sure, we have two of New York’s most FAMOUS horror stories in our first part, beginning with a spirited sailor named Mickey who haunted a classic structure on the Lower…
#143 Water for New York: Croton Aqueduct
Sep 20, 2012 • 46 min
One of the great challenges faced by a growing, 19th-century New York City was the need for a viable, clean water supply. Before the 1830s, citizens relied on cisterns to collect rainwater, a series of city wells drilling down to underground springs,…
#142 New York University (NYU)
Aug 24, 2012 • 45 min
They once called it the University of the City of New York, an innovative, nondenominational school located in a intellectual castle on the northeast corner of the Washington military parade ground. Today its better known as New York University,…
#141 New York Beer History
Jul 26, 2012 • 49 min
New York City’s thriving craft brewing industry today hearkens to a time over a century ago when the city was one of America’s great beer-making capitols, the home to a robust industry of breweries and beer halls. In the 19th century,…
#140 Rockaway Beach
Jun 28, 2012 • 49 min
The Rockaways are a world unto its own, a former resort destination with miles of beach facing into the Atlantic Ocean, a collection of diverse neighborhoods and a truly quirky history. Retaining a variant of its original Lenape name, the peninsula…
#139 Brooklyn Academy of Music
Jun 1, 2012 • 46 min
One of New York’s oldest cultural institutions, the Brooklyn Academy of Music has an unusual history that spans over 150 years and two locations. We trace the story from the earliest roots of a Manhattan-Brooklyn rivalry and a discussion over…
#138: St. Mark’s-in-the-Bowery
May 3, 2012 • 53 min
St. Mark’s-in-the-Bowery is one of Manhattan’s most interesting and mysterious links to early New York history. This East Village church was built in 1799 atop the location of the original chapel of Peter Stuyvesant, New Amsterdam’s peg-legged…
#137 NYC and the World of Radio
Apr 5, 2012 • 55 min
The discovery of radio changed the world, and New York City was often front and center for its creation and development as America’s prime entertainment source during the 1930s and 40s. In this show, we take you on a 50-year journey, from Marconi’s…
#136 High Line Walking Tour
Mar 22, 2012 • 32 min
Welcome to the unofficial High Line audio walking tour! In our last podcast, we gave you a history of the High Line, the one-mile linear park situated atop a stretch of abandoned elevated railroad tracks along the West Side. This time, I’ll take you…
#135 The High Line
Mar 8, 2012 • 45 min
The High Line, which snakes up New York’s west side, is an ambitious park project refitting abandoned elevated train lines into a breathtaking contemporary park. This is the remnant of a raised freight-delivery track system that supported New York’s…
#134 St. Patrick’s Cathedral
Feb 10, 2012 • 46 min
One of America’s most famous churches and a graceful icon upon the landscape of midtown Manhattan, St. Patrick’s Cathedral was also one of New York’s most arduous building projects, taking decades to build. An overflow of worshippers at…
#133 Red Hook: Brooklyn on the Waterfront
Jan 13, 2012 • 21 min
Red Hook, Brooklyn, the neighborhood called by the Dutch ‘Roode Hoek’ for its red soil, became a key port during the 19th century, a stopping point for vessels carry a vast array of raw goods from the interior of the United States along the Erie…
#132 Electric New York: Edison and the City Lights
Dec 15, 2011 • 50 min
The streets of New York have been lit in various ways through the decades, from the wisps of whale-oil flame to the modern comfort of gas lighting. With the discovery of electricity, it seemed possible to illuminate the world with a more dependable,…
#131 The First Apartment Building
Nov 17, 2011 • 21 min
Well, we’re movin’ on up….to the first New York apartment building ever constructed. New Yorkers of the emerging middle classes needed a place to live situated between the townhouse and the tenement, and the solution came from overseas — a daring…
#130 Haunted Histories of New York
Oct 20, 2011 • 50 min
What mischievous phantoms and malevolent spirits haunt the streets of New York City today? In our fifth annual podcast of local ghost stories, we bring you the histories of four very haunted places from three boroughs and a small island in the…