TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

www.ted.com/talks
Want TED Talks on the go? Every weekday, this feed brings you our latest talks in audio format. Hear thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable — from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between — given by the world’s lead
What comes after tragedy? Forgiveness | Azim Khamisa and Ples Felix
Jan 19 • 13 min
On one awful night in 1995, Ples Felix’s 14-year-old grandson murdered Azim Khamisa’s son in a gang initiation fueled by drugs, alcohol and a false sense of belonging. The deadly encounter sent Khamisa and Felix down paths of deep meditation, to forgive…
Want to change the world? Start by being brave enough to care | Cleo Wade
Jan 19 • 11 min
Artist and poet Cleo Wade recites a moving poem about being an advocate for love and acceptance in a time when both seem in short supply. Woven between stories of people at the beginning and end of their lives, she shares some truths about growing up (and…
American bipartisan politics can be saved — here’s how | Bob Inglis
Jan 18 • 10 min
Former Republican member of the U.S. Congress Bob Inglis shares an optimistic message about how conservatives can lead on climate change and other pressing problems — and how free enterprise (and working together across ideologies) hold the solutions.…
The hidden role informal caregivers play in health care | Scott Williams
Jan 17 • 9 min
Once a cared-for patient and now a caregiver himself, Scott Williams highlights the invaluable role of informal caregivers — those friends and relatives who, out of love, go the extra mile for patients in need. From personal care to advocacy to emotional…
Talk about your death while you’re still healthy | Michelle Knox
Jan 16 • 13 min
Do you know what you want when you die? Do you know how you want to be remembered? In a candid, heartfelt talk about a subject most of us would rather not discuss, Michelle Knox asks each of us to reflect on our core values around death and share them…
The search for “aha!” moments | Matt Goldman
Jan 16 • 14 min
In 1988, Matt Goldman co-founded Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create “aha moments” — moments of surprise,…
We need to talk about an injustice | Bryan Stevenson
Jan 15 • 23 min
In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of…
How to put the power of law in people’s hands | Vivek Maru
Jan 12 • 19 min
What can you do when the wheels of justice don’t turn fast enough? Or when they don’t turn at all? Vivek Maru is working to transform the relationship between people and law, turning law from an abstraction or threat into something that everyone can…
Want to be more creative? Go for a walk | Marily Oppezzo
Jan 11 • 5 min
When trying to come up with a new idea, we all have times when we get stuck. But according to research by behavioral and learning scientist Marily Oppezzo, getting up and going for a walk might be all it takes to get your creative juices flowing. In this…
How record collectors find lost music and preserve our cultural heritage | Alexis Charpentier
Jan 11 • 14 min
For generations, record collectors have played a vital role in the preservation of musical and cultural heritage by “digging” for obscure music created by overlooked artists. Alexis Charpentier shares his love of records — and stories of how collectors…
How we can stop Africa’s scientific brain drain | Kevin Njabo
Jan 10 • 8 min
How can Africans find solutions to Africa’s problems? Conservation biologist Kevin Njabo tells his personal story of how he nearly became part of the group of African scientists who seek an education abroad and never return — and why he’s now building a…
Medical tech designed to meet Africa’s needs | Soyapi Mumba
Jan 9 • 5 min
In sub-Saharan Africa, power outages, low technology penetration, slow internet and understaffed hospitals plague health care systems. To make progress on these problems in Malawi, TED Fellow Soyapi Mumba and his team created a new system from scratch —…
How adaptive clothing empowers people with disabilities | Mindy Scheier
Jan 9 • 13 min
Do you have a favorite T-shirt or pair of jeans that transforms you and makes you feel confident — makes you feel like you? That’s because what you wear can affect your mood, your health and your self-esteem, says fashion designer Mindy Scheier. Inspired…
Inside Africa’s thriving art scene | Touria El Glaoui
Jan 8 • 7 min
Art fair curator Touria El Glaoui is on a mission to showcase vital new art from African nations and the diaspora. She shares beautiful, inspiring, thrilling contemporary art that tells powerful stories of African identity and history — including works by…
Mammoths resurrected, geoengineering and other thoughts from a futurist | Stewart Brand and Chris Anderson
Jan 5 • 30 min
Stewart Brand is a futurist, counterculturist and visionary with a very wide-ranging mind. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Brand discusses … just about everything: human nature, bringing back the wooly mammoth, geoengineering, rewilding…
What we don’t teach kids about sex | Sue Jaye Johnson
Jan 4 • 7 min
As parents, it’s our job to teach our kids about sex. But beyond “the talk,” which covers biology and reproduction, there’s so much more we can say about the human experience of being in our bodies. Introducing “The Talk 2.0,” Sue Jaye Johnson shows us…
Our treatment of HIV has advanced. Why hasn’t the stigma changed? | Arik Hartmann
Jan 4 • 17 min
The treatment of HIV has significantly advanced over the past three decades — why hasn’t our perception of people with the disease advanced along with it? After being diagnosed with HIV, Arik Hartmann chose to live transparently, being open about his…
3 thoughtful ways to conserve water | Lana Mazahreh
Jan 3 • 11 min
According to the UN, nearly one in three people worldwide live in a country facing a water crisis, and less than five percent of the world lives in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago. Lana Mazahreh grew up in Jordan, a state that…
You aren’t at the mercy of your emotions — your brain creates them | Lisa Feldman Barrett
Jan 2 • 18 min
Can you look at someone’s face and know what they’re feeling? Does everyone experience happiness, sadness and anxiety the same way? What are emotions anyway? For the past 25 years, psychology professor Lisa Feldman Barrett has mapped facial expressions,…
How adoption worked for me | Christopher Ategeka
Jan 2 • 7 min
Talent is universal, but opportunity isn’t, says TED Fellow Christopher Ategeka. In this charming, hopeful talk, Ategeka tells his story of being orphaned at a young age — and how being adopted gave him the chance to experience a new culture, acquire an…
Your elusive creative genius | Elizabeth Gilbert
Jan 1 • 19 min
Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses — and shares the radical idea that, instead of the rare person “being” a genius, all of us “have” a genius. It’s a funny, personal and surprisingly moving talk.
The single biggest reason why startups succeed | Bill Gross
Dec 29, 2017 • 6 min
Bill Gross has founded a lot of startups, and incubated many others — and he got curious about why some succeeded and others failed. So he gathered data from hundreds of companies, his own and other people’s, and ranked each company on five key factors.…
The untapped genius that could change science for the better | Jedidah Isler
Dec 28, 2017 • 13 min
Jedidah Isler dreamt of becoming an astrophysicist since she was a young girl, but the odds were against her: At that time, only 18 black women in the United States had ever earned a PhD in a physics-related discipline. In this personal talk, she shares…
Strange answers to the psychopath test | Jon Ronson
Dec 27, 2017 • 18 min
Is there a definitive line that divides crazy from sane? With a hair-raising delivery, Jon Ronson, author of The Psychopath Test, illuminates the gray areas between the two. (With live-mixed sound by Julian Treasure and animation by Evan Grant.)
How to make hard choices | Ruth Chang
Dec 26, 2017 • 14 min
Here’s a talk that could literally change your life. Which career should I pursue? Should I break up — or get married?! Where should I live? Big decisions like these can be agonizingly difficult. But that’s because we think about them the wrong way, says…
What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Robert Waldinger
Dec 25, 2017 • 12 min
What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has…
How frustration can make us more creative | Tim Harford
Dec 22, 2017 • 15 min
Challenges and problems can derail your creative process … or they can make you more creative than ever. In the surprising story behind the best-selling solo piano album of all time, Tim Harford may just convince you of the advantages of having to work…
“Good” and “bad” are incomplete stories we tell ourselves | Heather Lanier
Dec 21, 2017 • 13 min
Heather Lanier’s daughter Fiona has Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a genetic condition that results in developmental delays — but that doesn’t make her tragic, angelic or any of the other stereotypes about kids like her. In this talk about the beautiful,…
The next generation of African architects and designers | Christian Benimana
Dec 21, 2017 • 12 min
Christian Benimana wants to build a network of architects who can help Africa’s booming cities flourish in sustainable, equitable ways — balancing growth with values that are uniquely African. From Nigeria to Burkina Faso and beyond, he shares examples of…
A mother and son united by love and art | Deborah Willis and Hank Willis Thomas
Dec 20, 2017 • 10 min
An art school professor once told Deborah Willis that she, as a woman, was taking a place from a good man — but the storied photographer says she instead made a space for a good man, her son Hank Willis Thomas. In this moving talk, the mother and son…
The power of citizen video to create undeniable truths | Yvette Alberdingk Thijm
Dec 19, 2017 • 12 min
Could smartphones and cameras be our most powerful weapons for social justice? Through her organization Witness, Yvette Alberdingk Thijm is developing strategies and technologies to help activists use video to protect and defend human rights. She shares…
A vehicle built in Africa, for Africa | Joel Jackson
Dec 19, 2017 • 8 min
Joel Jackson wants to reimagine transportation around the needs of the African consumer. He’s designed an SUV that’s rugged enough for long stretches of uneven terrain and affordable enough to be within reach of those who need it most. Learn more about…
The history of human emotions | Tiffany Watt Smith
Dec 18, 2017 • 14 min
The words we use to describe our emotions affect how we feel, says historian Tiffany Watt Smith, and they’ve often changed (sometimes very dramatically) in response to new cultural expectations and ideas. Take nostalgia, for instance: first defined in…
Want to get great at something? Get a coach | Atul Gawande
Dec 15, 2017 • 16 min
How do we improve in the face of complexity? Atul Gawande has studied this question with a surgeon’s precision. He shares what he’s found to be the key: having a good coach to provide a more accurate picture of our reality, to instill positive habits of…
How China is changing the future of shopping | Angela Wang
Dec 14, 2017 • 13 min
China is a huge laboratory of innovation, says retail expert Angela Wang, and in this lab, everything takes place on people’s phones. Five hundred million Chinese consumers — the equivalent of the combined populations of the US, UK and Germany — regularly…
A new weapon in the fight against superbugs | David Brenner
Dec 14, 2017 • 10 min
Since the widespread use of antibiotics began in the 1940s, we’ve tried to develop new drugs faster than bacteria can evolve — but this strategy isn’t working. Drug-resistant bacteria known as superbugs killed nearly 700,000 people last year, and by 2050…
Success stories from Kenya’s first makerspace | Kamau Gachigi
Dec 13, 2017 • 13 min
Africa needs engineers, but its engineering students often end up working at auditing firms and banks. Why? Kamau Gachigi suspects it’s because they don’t have the spaces and materials needed to test their ideas and start businesses. To solve this…
Lessons from a solar storm chaser | Miho Janvier
Dec 12, 2017 • 5 min
Space physicist Miho Janvier studies solar storms: giant clouds of particles that escape from the Sun and can disrupt life on Earth (while also producing amazing auroras). How do you study the atmosphere on the Sun, which burns at temperatures of up to…
Free yourself from your filter bubbles | Joan Blades and John Gable
Dec 12, 2017 • 9 min
Joan Blades and John Gable want you to make friends with people who vote differently than you do. A pair of political opposites, the two longtime pals know the value of engaging in honest conversations with people you don’t immediately agree with. Join…
Adventures of an interplanetary architect | Xavier De Kestelier
Dec 11, 2017 • 12 min
How will we live elsewhere in the galaxy? On Earth, natural resources for creating structures are abundant, but sending these materials up with us to the Moon or Mars is clunky and cost-prohibitive. Enter architect Xavier De Kestelier, who has a radical…
How augmented reality could change the future of surgery | Nadine Hachach-Haram
Dec 8, 2017 • 11 min
If you’re undergoing surgery, you want the best surgical team to collaborate on your case, no matter where they are. Surgeon and entrepreneur Nadine Hachach-Haram is developing a new system that helps surgeons operate together and train one another on new…
How urban agriculture is transforming Detroit | Devita Davison
Dec 7, 2017 • 12 min
There’s something amazing growing in the city of Detroit: healthy, accessible, delicious, fresh food. In a spirited talk, fearless farmer Devita Davison explains how features of Detroit’s decay actually make it an ideal spot for urban agriculture. Join…
What makes something go viral? | Dao Nguyen
Dec 7, 2017 • 10 min
What’s the secret to making content people love? Join BuzzFeed’s Publisher Dao Nguyen for a glimpse at how her team creates their tempting quizzes, lists and videos — and learn more about how they’ve developed a system to understand how people use content…
How fake handbags fund terrorism and organized crime | Alastair Gray
Dec 6, 2017 • 12 min
What’s the harm in buying a knock-off purse or a fake designer watch? According to counterfeit investigator Alastair Gray, fakes like these fund terrorism and organized crime. Learn more about the trillion-dollar underground economy of counterfeiting —…
The brain benefits of deep sleep — and how to get more of it | Dan Gartenberg
Dec 5, 2017 • 6 min
There’s nothing quite like a good night’s sleep. What if technology could help us get more out of it? Dan Gartenberg is working on tech that stimulates deep sleep, the most regenerative stage which (among other wonderful things) might help us consolidate…
Why I’m done trying to be “man enough” | Justin Baldoni
Dec 4, 2017 • 18 min
Justin Baldoni wants to start a dialogue with men about redefining masculinity — to figure out ways to be not just good men but good humans. In a warm, personal talk, he shares his effort to reconcile who he is with who the world tells him a man should…
Get comfortable with being uncomfortable | Luvvie Ajayi
Dec 1, 2017 • 10 min
Luvvie Ajayi isn’t afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. “Your silence serves no one,” says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker. In this bright, uplifting talk, Ajayi…
A Republican mayor’s plan to replace partisanship with policy | G.T. Bynum
Nov 30, 2017 • 13 min
Conventional wisdom says that to win an election, you need to play to your constituencies’ basest, most divisive instincts. But as a candidate for mayor of Tulsa, Oklahoma, G.T. Bynum decided to skip the smear campaigns, tell voters what he wanted to…
What AI is — and isn’t | Sebastian Thrun and Chris Anderson
Nov 30, 2017 • 24 min
Educator and entrepreneur Sebastian Thrun wants us to use AI to free humanity of repetitive work and unleash our creativity. In an inspiring, informative conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Thrun discusses the progress of deep learning, why we…
Fashion has a pollution problem — can biology fix it? | Natsai Audrey Chieza
Nov 29, 2017 • 13 min
Natsai Audrey Chieza is a designer on a mission — to reduce pollution in the fashion industry while creating amazing new things to wear. In her lab, she noticed that the bacteria Streptomyces coelicolor makes a striking red-purple pigment, and now she’s…
The future of good food in China | Matilda Ho
Nov 28, 2017 • 5 min
Fresh food free of chemicals and pesticides is hard to come by in China: in 2016, the Chinese government revealed half a million food safety violations in just nine months. In the absence of safe, sustainable food sources, TED Fellow Matilda Ho launched…
How we’re using drones to deliver blood and save lives | Keller Rinaudo
Nov 28, 2017 • 15 min
Keller Rinaudo wants everyone on earth to have access to basic health care, no matter how hard it is to reach them. With his start-up Zipline, he has created the world’s first drone delivery system to operate at national scale, transporting blood and…
The science of cells that never get old | Elizabeth Blackburn
Nov 27, 2017 • 18 min
What makes our bodies age … our skin wrinkle, our hair turn white, our immune systems weaken? Biologist Elizabeth Blackburn shares a Nobel Prize for her work finding out the answer, with the discovery of telomerase: an enzyme that replenishes the caps at…
How to speak so that people want to listen | Julian Treasure
Nov 24, 2017 • 9 min
Have you ever felt like you’re talking, but nobody is listening? Here’s Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to’s of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A…
10 ways to have a better conversation | Celeste Headlee
Nov 23, 2017 • 11 min
When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great…
An interview with the Queen of Creole Cuisine | Leah Chase and Pat Mitchell
Nov 22, 2017 • 22 min
Leah Chase’s New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase changed the course of American history over gumbo and fried chicken. During the civil rights movement, it was a place where white and black people came together, where activists planned protests and where…
How can groups make good decisions? | Mariano Sigman and Dan Ariely
Nov 22, 2017 • 8 min
We all know that when we make decisions in groups, they don’t always go right — and sometimes they go very wrong. How can groups make good decisions? With his colleague Dan Ariely, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman has been inquiring into how we interact to…
Activism needs introverts | Sarah Corbett
Nov 21, 2017 • 13 min
For the introverts among us, traditional forms activism like marches, protests and door-to-door canvassing can be intimidating and stressful. Take it from Sarah Corbett, a former professional campaigner and self-proclaimed introvert. She introduces us to…
How Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google manipulate our emotions | Scott Galloway
Nov 21, 2017 • 19 min
The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening…
The hidden opportunities of the informal economy | Niti Bhan
Nov 20, 2017 • 7 min
Niti Bhan studies business strategy for Africa’s informal markets: the small shops and stands, skilled craftspeople and laborers who are the invisible engine that keeps the continent’s economy running. It’s tempting to think of these workers as…
How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming | Per Espen Stoknes
Nov 17, 2017 • 15 min
The biggest obstacle to dealing with climate disruptions lies between your ears, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stokes. He’s spent years studying the defenses we use to avoid thinking about the demise of our planet — and figuring out a new way…
Why do I make art? To build time capsules for my heritage | Kayla Briët
Nov 17, 2017 • 5 min
Kayla Briët creates art that explores identity and self-discovery — and the fear that her culture may someday be forgotten. She shares how she found her creative voice and reclaimed the stories of her Dutch-Indonesian, Chinese and Native American heritage…
I don’t want children — stop telling me I’ll change my mind | Christen Reighter
Nov 16, 2017 • 14 min
One in five women in the United States will not have a biological child, and Christen Reighter is one of them. From a young age, she knew she didn’t want kids, in spite of the insistence of many people (including her doctor) who told her she’d change her…
How my dad’s dementia changed my idea of death (and life) | Beth Malone
Nov 16, 2017 • 7 min
With warmth and grace, Beth Malone tells the deeply personal story of her dad’s struggle with frontotemporal lobe dementia, and how it changed how she thinks about death (and life). A moving talk about a daughter’s love — and of letting go and finding…
How the military fights climate change | David Titley
Nov 15, 2017 • 7 min
Military leaders have known for millennia that the time to prepare for a challenge is before it hits you, says scientist and retired US Navy officer David Titley. He takes us from the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria to the icy shores of Svalbard to show…
The Housing First approach to homelessness | Lloyd Pendleton
Nov 14, 2017 • 13 min
What do you think would happen if you invited an individual with mental health issues who had been homeless for many years to move directly from the street into housing? Loyd Pendleton shares how he went from skeptic to believer in the Housing First…
How to talk (and listen) to transgender people | Jackson Bird
Nov 14, 2017 • 6 min
Gender should be the least remarkable thing about someone, but transgender people are still too often misunderstood. To help those who are scared to ask questions or nervous about saying the wrong thing, Jackson Bird shares a few ways to think about trans…
What I learned serving time for a crime I didn’t commit | Teresa Njoroge
Nov 13, 2017 • 12 min
In 2011, Teresa Njoroge was convicted of a financial crime she didn’t commit — the result of a long string of false accusations, increasing bribe attempts and the corrupt justice system in her home in Kenya. Once incarcerated, she discovered that most of…
How judges can show respect | Victoria Pratt
Nov 10, 2017 • 16 min
In halls of justice around the world, how can we ensure everyone is treated with dignity and respect? A pioneering judge in New Jersey, Victoria Pratt shares her principles of “procedural justice” — four simple, thoughtful steps that redefined the…
The biggest risks facing cities — and some solutions | Robert Muggah
Nov 9, 2017 • 17 min
With fantastic new maps that show interactive, visual representations of urban fragility, Robert Muggah articulates an ancient but resurging idea: cities shouldn’t just be the center of economics — they should also be the foundation of our political…
We should aim for perfection — and stop fearing failure | Jon Bowers
Nov 9, 2017 • 10 min
Sometimes trying your best isn’t enough; when the situation demands it, you need to be perfect. For Jon Bowers, who runs a training facility for professional delivery drivers, the stakes are high — 100 people in the US die every day in car accidents — and…
An interview with Mauritius’s first female president | Ameenah Gurib-Fakim and Stephanie Busari
Nov 8, 2017 • 18 min
Ameenah Gurib-Fakim has been an academic, an entrepreneur and is now the president of Mauritius — the first Muslim female head of state in Africa. In a wide-ranging conversation with journalist Stephanie Busari, Gurib-Fakim discusses the humble beginnings…
Why wildfires have gotten worse — and what we can do about it | Paul Hessburg
Nov 7, 2017 • 14 min
Megafires, individual fires that burn more than 100,000 acres, are on the rise in the western United States — the direct result of unintentional yet massive changes we’ve brought to the forests through a century of misguided management. What steps can we…
For the love of birds | Washington Wachira
Nov 6, 2017 • 13 min
From the glorious crested guinea fowl to the adulterous African jacana to vultures that can pick a zebra carcass clean in 30 minutes, Washington Wachira wants us all to get to know the marvelous species of birds that share the planet with us. If you’re…
How we can end sexual harassment at work | Gretchen Carlson
Nov 6, 2017 • 14 min
When Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace sexual harassment, it inspired women everywhere to take their power back and tell the world what happened to them. In a remarkable, fierce talk, she tells her story — and identifies three…
The global learning crisis — and what to do about it | Amel Karboul
Nov 3, 2017 • 15 min
The most important infrastructure we have is educated minds, says former Tunisian government minister Amel Karboul. Yet too often large investments go to more visible initiatives such as bridges and roads, when it’s the minds of our children that will…
The surprisingly charming science of your gut | Giulia Enders
Nov 2, 2017 • 14 min
Ever wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut — the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens — as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns…
Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa | Nnedi Okorafor
Nov 1, 2017 • 9 min
“My science fiction has different ancestors — African ones,” says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her “Binti” series and her novel “Lagoon,” Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work — and how she opens strange doors through…
How to win at evolution and survive a mass extinction | Lauren Sallan
Oct 31, 2017 • 6 min
Congratulations! By being here, alive, you are one of history’s winners — the culmination of a success story four billion years in the making. The other 99 percent of species who have ever lived on earth are dead — killed by fire, flood, asteroids, ice,…
Can we stop climate change by removing CO2 from the air? | Tim Kruger
Oct 31, 2017 • 8 min
Could we cure climate change? Geoengineering researcher Tim Kruger wants to try. He shares one promising possibility: using natural gas to generate electricity in a way that takes carbon dioxide out of the air. Learn more — both the potential and the…
The future of storytelling | Shonda Rhimes and Cyndi Stivers
Oct 30, 2017 • 21 min
“We all feel a compelling need to watch stories, to tell stories … to discuss the things that tell each one of us that we are not alone in the world,” says TV titan Shonda Rhimes. A dominant force in television since “Grey’s Anatomy” hit the airwaves,…
We’re building a dystopia just to make people click on ads | Zeynep Tufekci
Oct 27, 2017 • 22 min
We’re building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads…
The awful logic of land mines — and an app that helps people avoid them | Carlos Bautista
Oct 26, 2017 • 6 min
Fifty years of armed conflict in Colombia has left the countryside riddled with land mines that maim and kill innocent people who happen across them. To help keep communities safe from harm, TED Resident Carlos Bautista is developing an app to track land…
How we’ll earn money in a future without jobs | Martin Ford
Oct 26, 2017 • 14 min
Machines that can think, learn and adapt are coming — and that could mean that we humans will end up with significant unemployment. What should we do about it? In a straightforward talk about a controversial idea, futurist Martin Ford makes the case for…
How diversity makes teams more innovative | Rocío Lorenzo
Oct 25, 2017 • 11 min
Are diverse companies really more innovative? Rocío Lorenzo and her team surveyed 171 companies to find out — and the answer was a clear yes. In a talk that will help you build a better, more robust company, Lorenzo dives into the data and explains how…
Why I risked my life to expose a government massacre | Anjan Sundaram
Oct 24, 2017 • 7 min
A war zone can pass for a mostly peaceful place when no one is watching, says investigative journalist and TED Fellow Anjan Sundaram. In this short, incisive talk, he takes us inside the conflict in the Central African Republic, where he saw the…
What it’s like to be a woman in Hollywood | Naomi McDougall Jones
Oct 24, 2017 • 17 min
What we see in movies matters: it affects our hobbies, our career choices, our emotions and even our identities. Right now, we don’t see enough women on screen or behind the camera — but waiting for Hollywood to grow a conscience isn’t going to fix the…
A pro wrestler’s guide to confidence | Mike Kinney
Oct 23, 2017 • 13 min
You are more than you think you are, says former pro wrestler Mike Kinney — you just have to find what makes you unique and use it to your advantage. For years Kinney “turned up” the parts of himself that made him special as he invented and perfected his…
The powerful stories that shaped Africa | Gus Casely-Hayford
Oct 20, 2017 • 19 min
In the vast sweep of history, even an empire can be forgotten. In this wide-ranging talk, Gus Casely-Hayford shares origin stories of Africa that are too often unwritten, lost, unshared. Travel to Great Zimbabwe, the ancient city whose mysterious origins…
A precise, three-word address for every place on earth | Chris Sheldrick
Oct 19, 2017 • 5 min
With what3words, Chris Sheldrick and his team have divided the entire planet into three-meter squares and assigned each a unique, three-word identifier, like famous.splice.writers or blocks.evenly.breed, giving a precise address to the billions of people…
Portraits that transform people into whatever they want to be | Uldus Bakhtiozina
Oct 19, 2017 • 7 min
With her gorgeous, haunting photographs, artist Uldus Bakhtiozina documents dreams, working with daily life as she imagines it could be. She creates everything in her work by hand — from costumes to stages — without digital manipulation, bringing us…
The new age of corporate monopolies | Margrethe Vestager
Oct 18, 2017 • 19 min
Margrethe Vestager wants to keep European markets competitive — which is why, on behalf of the EU, she’s fined Google $2.8 billion for breaching antitrust rules, asked Apple for $15.3 billion in back taxes and investigated a range of companies, from…
We can hack our immune cells to fight cancer | Elizabeth Wayne
Oct 17, 2017 • 5 min
After decades of research and billions spent in clinical trials, we still have a problem with cancer drug delivery, says biomedical engineer Elizabeth Wayne. Chemotherapy kills cancer — but it kills the rest of your body, too. Instead of using human…
What’s hidden under the Greenland ice sheet? | Kristin Poinar
Oct 17, 2017 • 9 min
The Greenland ice sheet is massive, mysterious — and melting. Using advanced technology, scientists are revealing its secrets for the first time, and what they’ve found is amazing: hidden under the ice sheet is a vast aquifer that holds a Lake Tahoe-sized…
How I became an entrepreneur at 66 | Paul Tasner
Oct 16, 2017 • 6 min
It’s never too late to reinvent yourself. Take it from Paul Tasner — after working continuously for other people for 40 years, he founded his own start-up at age 66, pairing his idea for a business with his experience and passion. And he’s not alone. As…
The revolutionary power of diverse thought | Elif Shafak
Oct 13, 2017 • 21 min
“From populist demagogues, we will learn the indispensability of democracy,” says novelist Elif Shafak. “From isolationists, we will learn the need for global solidarity. And from tribalists, we will learn the beauty of cosmopolitanism.” A native of…
3 fears about screen time for kids — and why they’re not true | Sara DeWitt
Oct 12, 2017 • 11 min
We check our phones upwards of 50 times per day — but when our kids play around with them, we get nervous. Are screens ruining childhood? Not according to children’s media expert Sara DeWitt. In a talk that may make you feel a bit less guilty about…
Why jobs of the future won’t feel like work | David Lee
Oct 11, 2017 • 10 min
We’ve all heard that robots are going to take our jobs — but what can we do about it? Innovation expert David Lee says that we should start designing jobs that unlock our hidden talents and passions — the things we spend our weekends doing — to keep us…
The forgotten art of the zoetrope | Eric Dyer
Oct 10, 2017 • 8 min
Artist Eric Dyer spent years working at a computer to produce images for the screen. Longing to get his hands back on his work, he began exploring the zoetrope, a popular 19th-century device that was used to create the illusion of motion long before the…
Electrical experiments with plants that count and communicate | Greg Gage
Oct 10, 2017 • 9 min
Neuroscientist Greg Gage takes sophisticated equipment used to study the brain out of graduate-level labs and brings them to middle- and high-school classrooms (and, sometimes, to the TED stage.) Prepare to be amazed as he hooks up the Mimosa pudica, a…
How Africa can use its traditional knowledge to make progress | Chika Ezeanya-Esiobu
Oct 9, 2017 • 14 min
Chika Ezeanya-Esiobu wants to see Africans unleash their suppressed creative and innovative energies by acknowledging the significance of their indigenous, authentic knowledge. In this powerful talk, she shares examples of untapped, traditional African…
How to seek truth in the era of fake news | Christiane Amanpour
Oct 6, 2017 • 17 min
Known worldwide for her courage and clarity, Christiane Amanpour has spent the past three decades interviewing business, cultural and political leaders who have shaped history. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Amanpour discusses fake news,…
A global food crisis may be less than a decade away | Sara Menker
Oct 5, 2017 • 17 min
Sara Menker quit a career in commodities trading to figure out how the global value chain of agriculture works. Her discoveries have led to some startling predictions: “We could have a tipping point in global food and agriculture if surging demand…
Don’t suffer from your depression in silence | Nikki Webber Allen
Oct 5, 2017 • 6 min
Having feelings isn’t a sign of weakness — they mean we’re human, says producer and activist Nikki Webber Allen. Even after being diagnosed with anxiety and depression, Webber Allen felt too ashamed to tell anybody, keeping her condition a secret until a…
Mind-blowing, magnified portraits of insects | Levon Biss
Oct 4, 2017 • 7 min
Photographer Levon Biss was looking for a new, extraordinary subject when one afternoon he and his young son popped a ground beetle under a microscope and discovered the wondrous world of insects. Applying his knowledge of photography to subjects just…
The magic of Khmer classical dance | Prumsodun Ok
Oct 3, 2017 • 10 min
For more than 1,000 years, Khmer dancers in Cambodia have been seen as living bridges between heaven and earth. In this graceful dance-talk hybrid, artist Prumsodun Ok — founder of Cambodia’s first all-male and gay-identified dance company — details the…
Lessons from the longest study on human development | Helen Pearson
Oct 2, 2017 • 12 min
For the past 70 years, scientists in Britain have been studying thousands of children through their lives to find out why some end up happy and healthy while others struggle. It’s the longest-running study of human development in the world, and it’s…
What I learned as a prisoner in North Korea | Euna Lee
Sep 29, 2017 • 11 min
In March 2009, North Korean soldiers captured journalist Euna Lee and her colleague Laura Ling while they were shooting a documentary on the border with China. The courts sentenced them to 12 years of hard labor, but American diplomats eventually…
What teen pregnancy looks like in Latin America | Christian Rodríguez
Sep 28, 2017 • 4 min
Christian Rodríguez is a photographer and filmmaker — and the son of a teenage mother. For the past five years, he has documented teen pregnancy in Latin America, creating intimate and dignified portraits of mothers as young as 12 years old. In this…
The warmth and wisdom of mud buildings | Anna Heringer
Sep 28, 2017 • 13 min
“There are a lot of resources given by nature for free — all we need is our sensitivity to see them and our creativity to use them,” says architect Anna Heringer. Heringer uses low-tech materials like mud and bamboo to create structures from China to…
Future tech will give you the benefits of city life anywhere | Julio Gil
Sep 27, 2017 • 11 min
Don’t believe predictions that say the future is trending towards city living. Urbanization is actually reaching the end of its cycle, says logistics expert Julio Gil, and soon more people will be choosing to live (and work) in the countryside, thanks to…
Why people of different faiths are painting their houses of worship yellow | Nabila Alibhai
Sep 26, 2017 • 11 min
Divisions along religious lines are deepening, and we’re doubting more and more how much we have in common. How can we stand boldly and visibly together? Inspired by an idea from her collaborator Yazmany Arboleda, place-maker Nabila Alibhai and her…
The fascinating secret lives of giant clams | Mei Lin Neo
Sep 26, 2017 • 5 min
When you think about the deep blue sea, you might instantly think of whales or coral reefs. But spare a thought for giant clams, the world’s largest living shellfish. These incredible creatures can live to 100, grow up to four and a half feet long and…
The boost students need to overcome obstacles | Anindya Kundu
Sep 25, 2017 • 7 min
How can disadvantaged students succeed in school? For sociologist Anindya Kundu, grit and stick-to-itiveness aren’t enough; students also need to develop their agency, or their capacity to overcome obstacles and navigate the system. He shares hopeful…
How a video game might help us build better cities | Karoliina Korppoo
Sep 22, 2017 • 8 min
With more than half of the world population living in cities, one thing is undeniable: we are an urban species. Part game, part urban planning sketching tool, “Cities: Skylines” encourages people to use their creativity and self-expression to rethink the…
A black man goes undercover in the alt-right | Theo E.J. Wilson
Sep 21, 2017 • 18 min
In an unmissable talk about race and politics in America, Theo E.J. Wilson tells the story of becoming Lucius25, white supremacist lurker, and the unexpected compassion and surprising perspective he found from engaging with people he disagrees with. He…
What intelligent machines can learn from a school of fish | Radhika Nagpal
Sep 21, 2017 • 10 min
Science fiction visions of the future show us AI built to replicate our way of thinking — but what if we modeled it instead on the other kinds of intelligence found in nature? Robotics engineer Radhika Nagpal studies the collective intelligence displayed…
The most Martian place on Earth | Armando Azua-Bustos
Sep 20, 2017 • 4 min
How can you study Mars without a spaceship? Head to the most Martian place on Earth — the Atacama Desert in Chile. Astrobiologist Armando Azua-Bustos grew up in this vast, arid landscape and now studies the rare life forms that have adapted to survive…
What we’re missing in the debate about immigration | Duarte Geraldino
Sep 19, 2017 • 7 min
Between 2008 and 2016, the United States deported more than three million people. What happens to those left behind? Journalist Duarte Geraldino picks up the story of deportation where the state leaves off. Learn more about the wider impact of forced…
Why Africa must become a center of knowledge again | Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò
Sep 19, 2017 • 13 min
How can Africa, the home to some of the largest bodies of water in the world, be said to have a water crisis? It doesn’t, says Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò — it has a knowledge crisis. Táíwò suggests that lack of knowledge on important topics like water and…
How digital DNA could help you make better health choices | Jun Wang
Sep 18, 2017 • 14 min
What if you could know exactly how food or medication would impact your health — before you put it in your body? Genomics researcher Jun Wang is working to develop digital doppelgangers for real people; they start with genetic code, but they’ll also…
Living sculptures that stand for history’s truths | Sethembile Msezane
Sep 15, 2017 • 13 min
In the century-old statues that occupy Cape Town, Sethembile Mzesane didn’t see anything that looked like her own reality. So she became a living sculpture herself, standing for hours on end in public spaces dressed in symbolic costumes, to reclaim the…
The fascinating physics of everyday life | Helen Czerski
Sep 14, 2017 • 15 min
Physics doesn’t just happen in a fancy lab — it happens when you push a piece of buttered toast off the table or drop a couple of raisins in a fizzy drink or watch a coffee spill dry. Become a more interesting dinner guest as physicist Helen Czerski…
The real reason manufacturing jobs are disappearing | Augie Picado
Sep 14, 2017 • 12 min
We’ve heard a lot of rhetoric lately suggesting that countries like the US are losing valuable manufacturing jobs to lower-cost markets like China, Mexico and Vietnam — and that protectionism is the best way forward. But those jobs haven’t disappeared for…
A forgotten ancient grain that could help Africa prosper | Pierre Thiam
Sep 13, 2017 • 15 min
Forget quinoa. Meet fonio, an ancient “miracle grain” native to Senegal that’s versatile, nutritious and gluten-free. In this passionate talk, chef Pierre Thiam shares his obsession with the hardy crop and explains why he believes that its…
What really motivates people to be honest in business | Alexander Wagner
Sep 12, 2017 • 13 min
Each year, one in seven large corporations commits fraud. Why? To find out, Alexander Wagner takes us inside the economics, ethics and psychology of doing the right thing. Join him for an introspective journey down the slippery slopes of deception as he…
There’s more to life than being happy | Emily Esfahani Smith
Sep 12, 2017 • 12 min
Our culture is obsessed with happiness, but what if there’s a more fulfilling path? Happiness comes and goes, says writer Emily Esfahani Smith, but having meaning in life — serving something beyond yourself and developing the best within you — gives you…
How our friendship survives our opposing politics | Caitlin Quattromani and Lauran Arledge
Sep 11, 2017 • 14 min
Can you still be friends with someone who doesn’t vote the same way as you? For Caitlin Quattromani and Lauran Arledge, two best friends who think very differently about politics, the outcome of the 2016 US presidential election could have resulted in…
Who belongs in a city? | OluTimehin Adegbeye
Sep 8, 2017 • 12 min
Underneath every shiny new megacity, there’s often a story of communities displaced. In this moving, poetic talk, OluTimehin Adegbeye details how government land grabs are destroying the lives of thousands who live in the coastal communities of Lagos,…
What it feels like to see Earth from space | Benjamin Grant
Sep 7, 2017 • 12 min
What the astronauts felt when they saw Earth from space changed them forever. Author and artist Benjamin Grant aims to provoke this same feeling of overwhelming scale and beauty in each of us through a series of stunning satellite images that show the…
How to build a company where the best ideas win | Ray Dalio
Sep 6, 2017 • 16 min
What if you knew what your coworkers really thought about you and what they were really like? Ray Dalio makes the business case for using radical transparency and algorithmic decision-making to create an idea meritocracy where people can speak up and say…
How young people join violent extremist groups — and how to stop them | Erin Marie Saltman
Sep 5, 2017 • 11 min
Terrorists and extremists aren’t all naturally violent sociopaths — they’re deliberately recruited and radicalized in a process that doesn’t fit into a neat pattern. Erin Marie Saltman discusses the push and pull factors that cause people to join…
A smog vacuum cleaner and other magical city designs | Daan Roosegaarde
Sep 5, 2017 • 12 min
Daan Roosegaarde uses technology and creative thinking to produce imaginative, earth-friendly designs. He presents his latest projects — from a bike path in Eindhoven, where he reinterpreted “The Starry Night” to get people thinking about green energy, to…
Dare to refuse the origin myths that claim who you are | Chetan Bhatt
Sep 1, 2017 • 19 min
We all have origin stories and identity myths, our tribal narratives that give us a sense of security and belonging. But sometimes our small-group identities can keep us from connecting with humanity as a whole — and even keep us from seeing others as…
How your pictures can help reclaim lost history | Chance Coughenour
Aug 31, 2017 • 11 min
Digital archaeologist Chance Coughenour is using pictures — your pictures — to reclaim antiquities that have been lost to conflict and disaster. After crowdsourcing photographs of destroyed monuments, museums and artifacts, Coughenour uses advanced…
How the US government spies on people who protest — including you | Jennifer Granick
Aug 31, 2017 • 14 min
What’s stopping the American government from recording your phone calls, reading your emails and monitoring your location? Very little, says surveillance and cybersecurity counsel Jennifer Granick. The government collects all kinds of information about…
Can a robot pass a university entrance exam? | Noriko Arai
Aug 30, 2017 • 13 min
Meet Todai Robot, an AI project that performed in the top 20 percent of students on the entrance exam for the University of Tokyo — without actually understanding a thing. While it’s not matriculating anytime soon, Todai Robot’s success raises alarming…
Why we need to end the era of orphanages | Tara Winkler
Aug 29, 2017 • 13 min
Could it be wrong to help children in need by starting an orphanage? In this eye-opening talk about the bad consequences of good intentions, Tara Winkler speaks out against the spread of orphanages in developing countries, caused in part by foreign…
Fun, fierce and fantastical African art | Wanuri Kahiu
Aug 29, 2017 • 5 min
We’re so used to narratives out of Africa being about war, poverty and devastation, says TED Fellow Wanuri Kahiu. Where’s the fun? Introducing “AfroBubbleGum” — African art that’s vibrant, lighthearted and without a political agenda. Rethink the value of…
When workers own companies, the economy is more resilient | Niki Okuk
Aug 28, 2017 • 12 min
Another economic reality is possible — one that values community, sustainability and resiliency instead of profit by any means necessary. Niki Okuk shares her case for cooperative economics and a vision for how working-class people can organize and own…
“The Sacred Art of the Ori” | Laolu Senbanjo
Aug 25, 2017 • 8 min
Every artist has a name, and every artist has a story. Laolu Senbanjo’s story started in Nigeria, where he was surrounded by the culture and mythology of the Yoruba, and brought him to law school, to New York and eventually to work on Beyoncé’s…
What the sugar coating on your cells is trying to tell you | Carolyn Bertozzi
Aug 24, 2017 • 11 min
Your cells are coated with sugars that store information and speak a secret language. What are they trying to tell us? Your blood type, for one — and, potentially, that you have cancer. Chemical biologist Carolyn Bertozzi researches how sugars on…
What would happen if we upload our brains to computers? | Robin Hanson
Aug 24, 2017 • 12 min
Meet the “ems” — machines that emulate human brains and can think, feel and work just like the brains they’re copied from. Futurist and social scientist Robin Hanson describes a possible future when ems take over the global economy, running on superfast…
A lyrical bridge between past, present and future | David Whyte
Aug 23, 2017 • 20 min
With his signature charm and searching insight, David Whyte meditates on the frontiers of the past, present and future, sharing two poems inspired by his niece’s hike along El Camino de Santiago de Compostela in Spain.
What moral decisions should driverless cars make? | Iyad Rahwan
Aug 22, 2017 • 13 min
Should your driverless car kill you if it means saving five pedestrians? In this primer on the social dilemmas of driverless cars, Iyad Rahwan explores how the technology will challenge our morality and explains his work collecting data from real people…
The era of blind faith in big data must end | Cathy O’Neil
Aug 22, 2017 • 13 min
Algorithms decide who gets a loan, who gets a job interview, who gets insurance and much more — but they don’t automatically make things fair. Mathematician and data scientist Cathy O’Neil coined a term for algorithms that are secret, important and…
How I found myself through music | Anika Paulson
Aug 21, 2017 • 9 min
“Music is everywhere, and it is in everything,” says musician, student and TED-Ed Clubs star Anika Paulson. Guitar in hand, she plays through the beats of her life in an exploration of how music connects us and makes us what we are.
The secret to living longer may be your social life | Susan Pinker
Aug 18, 2017 • 16 min
The Italian island of Sardinia has more than six times as many centenarians as the mainland and ten times as many as North America. Why? According to psychologist Susan Pinker, it’s not a sunny disposition or a low-fat, gluten-free diet that keeps the…
A practical way to help the homeless find work and safety | Richard J. Berry
Aug 17, 2017 • 12 min
When Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque, saw a man on a street corner holding a cardboard sign that read “Want a job,” he decided to take him (and others in his situation) up on it. He and his staff started a citywide initiative to help the…
7 principles for building better cities | Peter Calthorpe
Aug 17, 2017 • 14 min
More than half of the world’s population already lives in cities, and another 2.5 billion people are projected to move to urban areas by 2050. The way we build new cities will be at the heart of so much that matters, from climate change to economic…
How artists can (finally) get paid in the digital age | Jack Conte
Aug 16, 2017 • 10 min
It’s been a weird 100 years for artists and creators, says musician and entrepreneur Jack Conte. The traditional ways we’ve turned art into money (like record sales) have been broken by the internet, leaving musicians, writers and artists wondering how to…
How I help free innocent people from prison | Ronald Sullivan
Aug 15, 2017 • 11 min
Harvard Law professor Ronald Sullivan fights to free wrongfully convicted people from jail — in fact, he has freed some 6,000 innocent people over the course of his career. He shares heartbreaking stories of how (and why) people end up being put in jail…
How boredom can lead to your most brilliant ideas | Manoush Zomorodi
Aug 15, 2017 • 16 min
Do you sometimes have your most creative ideas while folding laundry, washing dishes or doing nothing in particular? It’s because when your body goes on autopilot, your brain gets busy forming new neural connections that connect ideas and solve problems.…
Courage is contagious | Damon Davis
Aug 14, 2017 • 5 min
When artist Damon Davis went to join the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, after police killed Michael Brown in 2014, he found not only anger but also a sense of love for self and community. His documentary “Whose Streets?” tells the story of the protests…
The gospel of doubt | Casey Gerald
Jul 7, 2017 • 18 min
What do you do when your firmly held beliefs turn out not to be true? When Casey Gerald’s religion failed him, he searched for something new to believe in — in business, in government, in philanthropy — but found only false saviors. In this moving talk,…
My year of living biblically | AJ Jacobs
Jul 6, 2017 • 17 min
Author, philosopher, prankster and journalist AJ Jacobs talks about the year he spent living biblically — following the rules in the Bible as literally as possible.
Don’t ask where I’m from, ask where I’m a local | Taiye Selasi
Jul 5, 2017 • 16 min
When someone asks you where you’re from … do you sometimes not know how to answer? Writer Taiye Selasi speaks on behalf of “multi-local” people, who feel at home in the town where they grew up, the city they live now and maybe another place or two. “How…
Everyone around you has a story the world needs to hear | Dave Isay
Jul 4, 2017 • 21 min
Dave Isay opened the first StoryCorps booth in New York’s Grand Central Terminal in 2003 with the intention of creating a quiet place where a person could honor someone who mattered to them by listening to their story. Since then, StoryCorps has evolved…
Never, ever give up | Diana Nyad
Jul 3, 2017 • 15 min
In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming. And that’s how she finally achieved her lifetime goal as an athlete: an extreme 100-mile swim from Cuba to Florida —…
The unheard story of David and Goliath | Malcolm Gladwell
Jun 30, 2017 • 15 min
It’s a classic underdog tale: David, a young shepherd armed only with a sling, beats Goliath, the mighty warrior. The story has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks Malcolm Gladwell, is that really…
The danger of a single story | Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Jun 29, 2017 • 18 min
Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a…
Why I love a country that once betrayed me | George Takei
Jun 28, 2017 • 15 min
When he was a child, George Takei and his family were forced into an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, as a “security” measure during World War II. 70 years later, Takei looks back at how the camp shaped his surprising, personal definition of…
Why some of us don’t have one true calling | Emilie Wapnick
Jun 27, 2017 • 12 min
What do you want to be when you grow up? Well, if you’re not sure you want to do just one thing for the rest of your life, you’re not alone. In this illuminating talk, writer and artist Emilie Wapnick describes the kind of people she calls…
The boiling river of the Amazon | Andrés Ruzo
Jun 26, 2017 • 15 min
When Andrés Ruzo was a young boy in Peru, his grandfather told him a story with an odd detail: There is a river, deep in the Amazon, which boils as if a fire burns below it. Twelve years later, after training as a geoscientist, he set out on a journey…