The Americans

The Americans

www.the-americans.com
The new interview podcast about America today


#34 Timothy Snyder, how debilitated is U.S. healthcare?
Oct 7 • 25 min
After becoming seriously ill, Timothy Snyder experienced first-hand just how decrepit the American healthcare system is. Snyder’s new book “Our Malady: Lessons in Liberty from a Hospital Diary” goes into detail about his experience of receiving below-par…
#33 David Enrich, would Trump be president without Deutsche Bank?
Sep 2 • 30 min
David Enrich is financial editor at The New York Times, after having worked for The Wall Street Journal for a number of years. He has a total of nearly 20 years of experience as a journalist, specialized in investigative work. His most recent research has…
#32 Daniel Hamilton, why is it the end of a transatlantic era?
Aug 5 • 35 min
Daniel Hamilton is a highly-experienced expert on transatlantic relations. He served several Secretaries of State as well as the U.S. Embassy in Germany and currently holds a position as Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Professor at Johns Hopkins SAIS.…
#31 Kenneth Roth, what does COVID-19 have to do with human rights?
Jul 1 • 34 min
This episode’s interview guest is none other than Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, Kenneth Roth. He has been at the helm of the NGO for 27 years. Under his leadership, it has developed into an international organization with real impact. With…
#30 Amy Stebbins, how has the coronavirus infected the art world?
Jun 3 • 40 min
Amy Stebbins is an American living in Germany. She is a writer and director for theater and opera. She says that there are extensive differences in the way the art industry is being affected by the lockdown in Germany and the United States. A well-known…
#29 Sarah E. Hill, is the pill changing how women think and feel?
May 27 • 32 min
The FDA approved the pill almost exactly 60 years ago, on May 9, 1960. It changed women’s lives dramatically. It was the first birth control method that was undetectable by a partner - and it also wasn’t an invasive procedure. Now, after decades, we’re…
#28 Susan B. Glasser, what three words describe Trump’s Washington?
May 20 • 40 min
Susan B. Glasser is a correspondent in Washington, DC for The New Yorker. In my interview with her she talks about the brave new world we’re living in right now. She explains how the coronavirus pandemic is “the ultimate clarifying moment,” shining a…
#27 Nicole Stott, how does an astronaut deal with isolation?
May 13 • 42 min
Nicole Stott says that mankind needs to act like space station crew members in this crisis, working together. She is one of the very few female astronauts who have seen the world from outer space - and she is even a spacewalker. She worked at NASA for 27…
#26 Warren Marine, is it easier to be a CEO in the U.S. or Germany right now?
May 6 • 35 min
Warren Marine is head of the Country Practice USA at KPMG Germany. The multinational professional services network is one of the Big Four accounting organizations worldwide. Marine is also treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Germany. The…
#25 Kimberly Marteau Emerson, what is Germany doing right in this crisis?
Apr 29 • 46 min
Kimberly Marteau Emerson is an attorney and human rights advocate who moved to Berlin as a U.S. ambassador’s wife in 2013. Working on her memoirs, she currently resides in Germany while her husband and daughters are back home in Los Angeles. She talks…
#24 Susan Mac Cormac, how can new corporate form help save the planet?
Apr 22 • 33 min
The idea that the COVID-19 crisis could push the reset button on different aspects of our lives is something we’ve been hearing quite a lot these days. One of the places we’re hearing it is on the stock markets. Susan Mac Cormac is an expert when it comes…
#23 Rebecca Makkai, can we fairly compare and contrast pandemics?
Apr 15 • 21 min
Rebecca Makkai is a novelist and short-story writer. She grew up in Lake Bluff, Illinois to parents who were linguistics professors. Her paternal grandmother was a well-known actress and novelist in Hungary. Makkai herself has published three novels so…
#22 John M. Barry, what have we learned from past pandemics?
Apr 8 • 29 min
John M. Barry is a historian and a prize-winning New York Times best-selling author of non-fiction work. Two of his books directly involved him in policy-making in the United States. After Hurricane Katrina, he was a member of a board responsible for…
#21 Ashoka Mody, can our economies survive the corona crisis?
Apr 1 • 27 min
Ashoka Mody is an economics professor at Princeton University. During the financial crisis he worked at the International Monetary Fund and designed the 2009 international bailout of Ireland’s banking system. Mody is also known for his book EuroTragedy: A…
#20 Mark Parkinson, can U.S. healthcare cope with COVID-19?
Mar 25 • 19 min
Europeans – especially in Central and Northern Europe – are proud of their public healthcare systems. We on this side of the Atlantic often wonder why the United States is still discussing “medicare for all”. It’s difficult to understand why a large…
#19 Charles Rivkin, what is the film industry doing to be more eco-friendly?
Mar 18 • 21 min
Charles Rivkin is chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association, for short: MPA. This American trade association represents the five major film studios of the United States, as well as Netflix. It established the film rating system and is tasked with…
#18 Sudha David-Wilp, what kind of stress test are the Democrats in for?
Mar 11 • 26 min
Sudha David-Wilp is a senior transatlantic fellow and deputy director of the German Marshall Fund’s Berlin office. She is expert for policy, transatlantic relations, U.S. Congress and German politics. She oversees the German Marshall Fund’s…
#17 Patrice McMahon, how much do big NGOs help themselves?
Mar 4 • 25 min
Patrice McMahon is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She delved into the role of NGOs in her book „The NGO Game“ - looking at the concrete examples of Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo. She comes to a sobering conclusion.…
#16 Doug Wead, how was your time in the Trump White House?
Feb 26 • 31 min
Doug Wead is a conservative commentator, writer, historian and politician. He has published more than 30 non-fiction books including several biographies of presidents and presidential families, among them Ronald Reagan and the Bush family. His latest work…
#15 Laurie Halse Anderson, how do you go from victim to survivor?
Feb 19 • 36 min
More than 20 years after her groundbreaking novel “Speak,” Laurie Halse Anderson has taken another step with her poetry memoir “Shout.” Her book reveals her own history as a survivor of sexual assault and deals with feelings of helplessness, depression…
#14 Garry Kasparov, what are the real dangers of AI?
Feb 12 • 35 min
Garry Kasparov is a former world chess champion, who many consider to be the greatest chess player of all time. He was born in Azerbaijan in the 1960s, which was at the time part of the Soviet Union. For nearly 20 years he was ranked No. 1 in the world.…
#13 Karen M. McManus, how do we get teens to read books?
Feb 5 • 22 min
Karen M. McManus is known for having her work on the New York Times Best Seller List for months at a time - and for her books being discussed online at length. Her novels have been translated into 40 languages, with teenagers around the world hooked on…
#12 Jill Lepore, who are America’s true national heroes?
Jan 29 • 29 min
We’re speaking with Jill Lepore, Professor of American History at Harvard University. In addition to this position, she also writes for The New Yorker and The New York Times on topics relating to history, law, literature and politics. Lepore has been a…
#11 Randall Munroe, how do I answer questions I’ve never even had?
Jan 22 • 26 min
This week Chelsea meets mathematician and author Randall Munroe. His new book is called “How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems”. Don’t try this at home It’s a self-help guide, with solutions for problems - that no one should ever…
#10 Madeline Miller, how far back does feminism go?
Jan 15 • 26 min
Madeline Miller is a Boston-born author who has dedicated her career to ancient Greek mythology. She draws parallels between the tales of heroes of ancient times and protagonists today. A new voice Her recent work centers around the Homeric works, “The…
#9 Jeremy Rifkin, why do we need a Green New Deal?
Jan 8 • 39 min
Jeremy Rifkin is a rather atypical economist. He is an activist and political advisor who believes that mankind is at its most crucial crossroads. He believes that climate change gives us only two options: Either we radically change the way we are living…
#8 Andrew Ridker, where does self-interest end and altruism begin?
Dec 18, 2019 • 29 min
This year Andrew Ridker has emerged as a true sensation among American authors. He published his first book this past spring. Critics are dazzled; five-star ratings keep rolling in from the general public. Gary Shteyngart, author of “Lake Success” calls…
#7 Neal Tilghman, how do opioid addicts get back on their feet?
Dec 11, 2019 • 20 min
After last week’s episode with journalist Beth Macy about the opioid epidemic in the United States, we’re now hearing about the people directly affected - and what their best chance of recovery is. Millions of Americans have slid into drug addiction…
#6 Beth Macy, how addicted is the USA?
Dec 4, 2019 • 37 min
Journalist Beth Macy spent seven years researching the opioid epidemic - a crisis that has been going on in the United States for some 20 years now. She talked with police officers, social workers, paramedics and doctors as well as addicts and their…
#5 John P. Carlin, are we seeing the dawn of a Code War?
Nov 27, 2019 • 31 min
We’re venturing into a parallel world - one that only exists in the shadows. Into the world of bits and bytes - into cyberspace. It’s a realm where war is being waged every day, says my guest today. We’re meeting John P. Carlin, former Assistant Attorney…
#4 Daniel Ellsberg, are whistleblowers traitors or heroes?
Nov 20, 2019 • 24 min
After having studied at Harvard and Cambridge, and serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, Daniel Ellsberg started to work for the Pentagon in the mid-1960s. During the Vietnam War he worked as a military analyst for an American policy think tank. His job was…
#3 Frank Sportolari, is lasting business built on friendship?
Nov 13, 2019 • 28 min
AmCham is Europe’s biggest bilateral trade association. Its main task is to foster German-American economic ties. AmCham connects its 2,300 members, among them, the biggest American employers in Germany, DAX companies, but also smaller businesses that…
#2 Beverly Seebach, how crucial is the expat vote?
Nov 6, 2019 • 27 min
With presidential elections coming up a year from now, a handful of the few thousand Democrats living in Germany are volunteering their free time to be an active part of politics in their home country. Beverly Seebach is one of them - and she’s doing all…
#1 Gary Shteyngart, does the American soul fit in a Greyhound bus?
Oct 29, 2019 • 25 min
“2020 is going to be a frightening year,” says Shteyngart - “frightening” because of Donald Trump. Shteyngart doesn’t hold out much hope; he thinks Trump could indeed be re-elected. The Muller Report hasn’t changed public opinion much. The phone call with…
The Americans - Starting this Wednesday
Oct 28, 2019 • 2 min
This podcast is about politics, it’s about society, it’s about people and it’s about stories. Stories Chelsea would like to share with you to paint a more complete picture of the United States than you might get from just watching a news program or…