Radio Cade

Radio Cade

www.cademuseum.org
Radio Cade is a podcast brought to you by the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Radio Cade introduces listeners to inventors and their sources of motivation and inspiration. Learn about their personal stories, how their …


Experiencing Food
Feb 12 • 24 min
Is food just food, or is there a power behind the experience of eating that can bring people together? Hirofumi Leung, the Founder of Dragonfly Restaurant Group, creates restaurants that push Japenese cuisine beyond sushi, creating authentic connections…
Testing CBD and Hemp
Feb 5 • 23 min
Cannabis and hemp. For year’s those substances operated in the shadows, and today they are at the center of a growing multibillion-dollar industry. How do you know what’s in them, and if they do the things they are supposed to do? Richard Miles…
Feed the Future
Jan 29 • 22 min
Technology and farming always have mixed well in the United States, but in many other countries, particularly in the underdeveloped world, it’s a different story. Why does it matter, and what can be done about it? Richard Miles interviews Gbola…
Ceramic Material That Can Grow With Bones
Jan 22 • 23 min
In 1969, Professor Larry Hench developed a glass that can grow with bones. His close friend and colleague, David Greenspan, helped Professor Hench develop the material into BioGlass, a product that is used in orthopedic and dental bone graft materials….
Using Salamander Tissue to Repair Human Skin
Jan 15 • 15 min
Jonelle Toothman has done a lot. A former Division 1 soccer player, Journalism major, and Army brat, she also co-founded NextGen Biologics and became its CEO. The company uses salamander tissue as an architecture for regenerative medicine to help burn…
An Edible Radio Transmitter That Monitors Medications
Jan 8 • 16 min
Medicine that talks to you. Eric Buffkin of eTectRx developed an “edible radio” powered by the chemicals in your stomach that tracks when you take every dose of your medication. Eric’s colleague, pharmacist Susan Baumgartner, says about 50% of people…
4H and Innovation in Agriculture
Jan 2 • 26 min
“Head, Heart, Hands, and Health,” otherwise known as 4-H, is all about developing young people, a mission that overlaps with the Cade Museum. Host Richard Miles talks with Jennifer Sirangelo, President and CEO of the National 4-H Council about 4-H’s ke…
Targeted Natural Enzymes to Treat Chronic Inflammation
Dec 26, 2019 • 25 min
Our 2019 Cade Prize winners, Greg Hudalla and Ben Keselowsky, have invented a new way to control inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. The method uses natural enzymes to suppress inflammation at the source, without the harmful side effects of…
Redefining Computer Science
Dec 18, 2019 • 20 min
Tony Barr has invented several computer programming languages, including the Statistical Analysis System, better known as SAS. He describes the concept of language, as “a mental model to think about the world.” Tony believes he has found the “concept of…
El Doctor y La Bebida (Spanish-language episode)
Dec 11, 2019 • 33 min
Alex De Quesada Sr. is the classic American success story. Unable to complete medical school in Castro’s Cuba, he moved to the U.S. “with $5” in his pocket and ended up at a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. In 1965, he joined the team in Gainesville t…
Working Food
Dec 4, 2019 • 22 min
Our food is brought to us from ever-increasing distances, but is this best for us? Anna Prizzia, the Founder of Working Food, views food as an entire ecosystem that must be cared for from seed to plate, farmer to consumer. Prizzia tells us why she set…
Inventive Ways to Use Lasers
Nov 27, 2019 • 23 min
Lasers aren’t just for sci-fi movies, it turns out they can be used for the treatment of tumors and ultra-fast communications networks. Michael Bass, a professor at the University of Central Florida, is the holder of 34 patents and a 2019 inductee in th…
The Video Revolution
Nov 20, 2019 • 16 min
In 1999, Chris Malachowsky was on the team at NVIDIA that invented the Graphics Processing Unit, an invention that transformed the consumer electronics industry. The GPU is now used by video games and virtually all social media platforms. The son of a d…
Virtual Reality for Business?
Nov 13, 2019 • 20 min
Animator Chance Glasco is famous for his work on video games, most notably the Call of Duty Franchise. His newest venture, Doghead Simulations, is using Virtual Reality to replace and improve conference calls, video calls, and screen sharing. Imagine…
Probiotics for Plants
Nov 6, 2019 • 20 min
Probiotics for plants? Paul Zorner, CEO of Locus Agricultural Solutions in San Diego, explains how bacteria and fungi help plants grow faster and pull more carbon dioxide out of the air. Even better, agricultural companies that use probiotics see a 200%…
The Art of Healthy Cows
Oct 30, 2019 • 25 min
How do ranchers know if their cows are healthy? One way is to use a quick and easy blood test to measure the strength of cows’ immune systems, a method that avoids the overuse of antibiotics. The test was invented by Treen Huo, a professor at the…
Miracle Drugs
Oct 23, 2019 • 23 min
Microbiologist Phillip Furman is the inventor of AZT, an anti-HIV drug, and other antiviral drugs for Herpes and Hepatitis B and C. He talks about his breakthrough moments, the difficulties of taking “miracle” drugs to market, and the culture shock of m…
Tracking Fresh Produce
Oct 16, 2019 • 20 min
Adam Kinsey is the founder of Verigo, a technology that uses smart sensors to track and monitor fresh produce during its journey from farm to truck to warehouse to store to table. New technology like RFID chips has gotten dramatically cheaper, making t…
Running Shoe Revolution
Oct 9, 2019 • 18 min
Running shoe technology hasn’t changed much in the last 30 years. Cyle Sage of On shoes, a 2011 Cade Prize finalist, explains how On shoes “roll and stop,” offering both vertical and horizontal cushioning. Cyle, a former triathlete and coach,…
Hedy Lamarr and Frequency Hopping
Oct 2, 2019 • 25 min
Once known as the “most beautiful woman in the world,” film star Hedy Lamarr also received a patent in 1942 for a “secret communications system” to safeguard U.S. torpedos from German radio jamming. The technology was the forerunner of “spread spectrum”…
Anti-Aging Technologies
Sep 25, 2019 • 26 min
James Clement conducts research into anti-aging technologies. He has studied people over 110 years of age and has found a strong genetic connection to their super long lives. Yet, periodic environmental signals such as fasting and certain dietary…
James Bates on Art and Football
Sep 18, 2019 • 24 min
James Bates is bursting with creativity. A professor, sports broadcaster, and artist, Bates, a former college football player, “feels blessed” with three “dream jobs.” As a child and through college, all he wanted to be was an NFL star, a desire nurture…
Better MRI’s
Sep 11, 2019 • 21 min
Jeff Fitzsimmons, a professor of radiology at the University of Florida, invented a way to use RF antennas to capture detailed signals from body parts that are undergoing an MRI. A native of Newark, New Jersey, Jeff moved to Florida as a kid, where…
Using Sharkskin to Fight Bacterial Growth
Aug 28, 2019 • 22 min
One of nine children, Dr. Anthony (Tony) Brennan grew up in a small town in upstate New York. He invented a way to inhibit bacterial growth through plastic sheets that are comprised of millions of microscopic features arranged in a diamond pattern -…
Training Nurses with Virtual Patients
Aug 21, 2019 • 24 min
How do you train people to talk to other people? For some professions, like nursing, communicating with others is a critical part of the job. Computer scientist Ben Lok developed software for nursing students to interview and examine a “virtual patient….
Better Employee Evaluations
Aug 14, 2019 • 24 min
How do you measure the performance of people whose achievements are hard to measure? Building on the work of Harold Fethe, Jeff Lyons founded MindSolve, a company that developed a technology which made employee evaluations more accurate and more reliabl…
Genetic Disorders and Lung Diseases
Aug 7, 2019 • 20 min
Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, a genetic disorder, is a common factor in lung diseases like COPD and emphysema. Dr. Mark Brantly’s research examines how AAT interacts with environmental factors that trigger the disorders. His findings are importa…
Online Games to Teach STEM Skills
Jul 31, 2019 • 22 min
Can video games be used for education? Co-host James Di Virgilio puts that question to Lindsey Tropf, founder and CEO of Immersed Games. Unlike other educational software, Immersed Games uses online, multi-player experiences to teach things like STEM sk…
Fixing IBS and Colorectal Cancer
Jul 24, 2019 • 19 min
Dr. Christian Jobin, a professor of medicine, is an expert on how microorganisms behave in the intestine. When they behave badly, this can lead to conditions like inflammatory bowel syndrome and colorectal cancer. “Academically I wasn’t very gifted,” Jo…
Electrical Waves to Enhance Musical Instruments
Jul 17, 2019 • 20 min
The engineering part of Augi Lye helped solve a problem for his musician self. How to speed up the aging of wooden violins, which enhances their tone? Augi not only came up with an invention, he formed a successful company that sells devices to all stri…
How the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Works
Jul 11, 2019 • 28 min
Beloved by corporate HR departments and government agencies alike, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator measures personality types. Betsy Styron, board chairman of the Myers-Brigg Foundation, explains how the assessment works and what it should and shouldn’t…
Underwater Wireless Networks
Jun 26, 2019 • 16 min
George Sklivanitis, founder of Extreme Comms Lab, believes we can build underwater wireless networks. Using enhanced modems on existing nodes (such as ships and submarines), his team’s technology can boost signal strength under the sea by 10 times. A …
Computer Components Connected by Light
Jun 19, 2019 • 14 min
Computers and smartphones are about to get a lot faster. If Roger Tipton succeeds with his invention, light will replace copper wires as connectors of computer components. This will be like using fiberoptic cable to access the web instead of a dial-up m…
Wire-Shaped Supercapacitor
Jun 12, 2019 • 27 min
2019 Cade Prize runner-ups Joe Sleppy and Isaiah Oladeji have invented a wire-shaped supercapacitor. Unlike batteries, capacitors are not used to store energy, but to deliver it quickly and in dense amounts. Using wires instead of plates or boxes…
Advanced Padding for Helmets and Athletic Shoes
Jun 5, 2019 • 20 min
Auxetic foam is an advanced form of padding for helmets and athletic shoes. The material, which has a honeycomb structure, becomes denser as more pressure is applied. Betsy Condon and her husband Joe have licensed the technology from Florida State Unive…
Paul Sanberg and the Florida Inventors’ Hall of Fame
May 29, 2019 • 16 min
Dr. Paul Sanberg, a Vice President at the University of South Florida, holds 157 patents and has published 650 scholarly articles on neurology. One of his biggest contributions, however, is founding the National Academy of Inventors and the Florida…
Targeted Natural Enzymes to Treat Chronic Inflammation
May 22, 2019 • 25 min
Our 2019 Cade Prize winners, Greg Hudalla and Ben Keselowsky, have invented a new way to control inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. The method uses natural enzymes to suppress inflammation at the source, without the harmful side effects of medicat…
A Better Ostomy Bag
May 15, 2019 • 24 min
As a kid and a young man Michael Seres, the founder and CEO of 11 Health, was plagued by Chrons disease and intestinal problems. Eventually, this required him to have an intestinal transplant, just the 11th ever performed in the UK. The surgery left him…
Handheld Water-Quality Sensor
May 8, 2019 • 30 min
With an aging infrastructure, the United States faces more scenarios like Flint, Michigan, where high lead levels became a threat to safety. Safa Amiri, a chemistry professor at the University of Florida, has developed a handheld water-quality sensor…
High-Quality Optical Filters
Apr 30, 2019 • 23 min
Optical filters are made for filtering out parts of the color spectrum that we don’t need, or that are even harmful. Migraines, for instance, are often caused by light from a particular part of the spectrum. Hooman Banei has invented a way to manufactu…
Elimination of False Positives in Blood Cultures
Apr 26, 2019 • 22 min
Dr. Rich Patton, MD, grew up in the small town of Wahoo, Nebraska where the town doctor clearly had a better life than he did as a child farm hand. That inspired Rich to eventually go to medical school and to become a pathologist. From there he saw how …
Judah Pollack, Author of The Net and the Butterfly
Mar 13, 2019 • 22 min
Where do creative ideas come and how do we capture them? Judah Pollack, author of The Net and the Butterfly, talks frontal lobes, “genius lounges,” and the Rolling Stones. Born and raised in Manhattan, Judah made his way to the West Coast, where he…
Reinventing Cuba
Mar 13, 2019 • 28 min
Without a free market for over almost 60 years, Cubans have been forced to make do without most things. Turns out your average Cuban is pretty ingenious. Randy Batista, Jorge Lavoy, and Gabriela Azcuy, decided to start collecting examples of how Cubans…
Quick 3D Color Maps of Real-World Environments
Mar 6, 2019 • 30 min
Amir Rubin is the co-founder of Paracosm, a company that developed a handheld device that creates 3D color maps of real-world environments. “We’ve turned reality,” says Amir, “into a video game.” Amir is a second-generation entrepreneur. Both his parent…
A Better Mosquito Trap
Feb 27, 2019 • 30 min
The son of a Pennsylvania preacher, Philip Koehler made his way to Florida courtesy of the U.S. Navy. Eventually he became a Professor of Urban Entomology at the University of Florida. He’s developed a mosquito and fly trap that uses a minimal amount of…
Better MRI’s
Feb 20, 2019 • 21 min
Jeff Fitzsimmons, a professor of radiology at the University of Florida, invented a way to use RF antennas to capture detailed signals from body parts that are undergoing an MRI. A native of Newark, New Jersey, Jeff moved to Florida as a kid, where hi…
Detecting Cheats on Contract Bidding
Feb 13, 2019 • 24 min
Big public infrastructure projects used to be synonymous with corruption, including bid rigging. Super-smart professors Jim McClave and Tom Rothrock figured out a way to detect bidding irregularities and catch cheaters. As a kid, Jim loved solving…
Identifying Water Pathogens Quickly and Cheaply
Feb 6, 2019 • 20 min
Detecting diseases in water is harder than it sounds. The normal process involves expensive, time-consuming lab tests. Joseph Moss of the University of West Florida has invented a better method that spins out water-borne pathogens to help identify them …
The Invention of the Cade Museum
Jan 23, 2019 • 24 min
Stephanie Bailes is the executive director of the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention, the sponsor of Radio Cade. In 2017, Stephanie was drawn to the Cade’s mission of “inspiring and equipping visionaries, inventors and entrepreneurs.” A native o…
Helping Doctors Prescribe Antibiotics
Jan 23, 2019 • 21 min
“Smart Steward” is a web-based platform that helps doctors prescribe antibiotics with the goal of reducing antibiotic resistance. The software helps track what other doctors have given a patient and makes custom recommendations for treatment. Guest…
So You Want to Start a BioTech Company?
Jan 23, 2019 • 26 min
Serial entrepreneur Randy Scott founded Novamin, a toothpaste using the bio-glass technology invented by Larry Hench (featured on “Glass that Grows,” 9/25/18). Bio-glass is a ceramic that essentially fuses with bone and cartilage in your body. Randy…
A Microchip That Acts Like a Brain
Jan 9, 2019 • 18 min
A microchip that operates like a brain!
Training Nurses with Virtual Patients
Jan 2, 2019 • 24 min
How do you train people to talk to other people? For some professions, like nursing, communicating with others is a critical part of the job. Computer scientist Ben Lok developed software for nursing students to interview and examine a “virtual…
A Simple Mosquito Water Trap
Dec 26, 2018 • 15 min
For most people, mosquitoes are very unwelcome. They can also carry dangerous diseases like the zika virus and malaria. Dr. Roberto Perreira has invented a simple mosquito water trap that doesn’t contain pesticides. Born and raised in Brazil,…
Spray Vaccinations for Chickens
Dec 19, 2018 • 18 min
Nine billion chickens are hatched every year in the U.S. Roy Curtiss and his colleagues came up with the idea of spray vaccinations, virtually eliminating the threat of salmonella for about one penny a chick. Always interested in genetics, Curtiss bega…
Detecting Traumatic Brain Injuries
Dec 12, 2018 • 12 min
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is hard to detect, and is sometimes called the “invisible injury.” Nancy Denslow, a scientist at the McKnight brain institute and cofounder of Banyan Biomarkers has developed a blood based test that will make TBI detection a…
Electrical Waves to Enhance Musical Instruments
Dec 5, 2018 • 20 min
The engineering part of Augi Lye helped solve a problem for his musician self. How to speed up the aging of wooden violins, which enhances their tone? Augi not only came up with an invention, he formed a successful company that sells devices to all…
Next Generation Batteries
Nov 28, 2018 • 20 min
Making rechargeable batteries more powerful, cheaper, and longer-lasting benefits just about everyone. “Not a very good student in school,” Phil Bennett didn’t get into any of the major Florida universities but grew interested in science in community co…
Faster and Cheaper Artificial Intelligence
Nov 21, 2018 • 14 min
Imagine a brain on a computer chip. Jack Kendall, founder of Rain Neuromorphics has figured out how to connect artificial neurons in “neuromorphic hardware,” a brain scaffolding useful for artificial intelligence. He hopes it will make A.I. cheaper and…
Easier EEG’s to Detect Head Injuries
Nov 14, 2018 • 22 min
EEG’s are great for diagnosing all sorts of conditions, including head injuries and seizures. But they’re hard to administer and thus don’t get used as often as they should. Elena Fraser and Duncan Kabinu, work with EncephaloDynamics a company that has …
Building Apps
Nov 7, 2018 • 22 min
Both recent graduates of the University of Florida, Marlana and Nahu work on building apps for a wide variety of customers. Their story is a partnership of two visions, one rooted in entrepreneurship and the other in engineering. Both credit their paren…
Functional Electrical Stimulation for Paralysis
Oct 31, 2018 • 18 min
A veteran of both SpaceX and General Electric, Alan Hamlet, along with Matthew Bellman, is the inventor of the Myocycle. The bicycle-like device provides exercise and functional electrical stimulation for people with paralysis, and offers hope to those …
Video Motion Analysis to Help People Walk
Oct 24, 2018 • 20 min
One of four girls, Cara Negri’s favorite book growing up was about a amputee named Michelle who went on to do everything. Cara has helped develop video motion analysis to analyze how people move and how to help them walk. Her company, PnO Data Solutions…
Antibodies to Identify Proteins
Oct 17, 2018 • 20 min
Born and raised in Nottingham, England, Gerry Shaw was always interested in biology. His mother’s dream was that he become “a priest or a doctor.” After receiving what Gerry calls his “Phony Doctor” (PhD), Gerry began a career in biochemistry. In 1999…
Enzymes to Degrade Kidney Stones
Oct 10, 2018 • 16 min
A native of Sweden, Helena Crowley moved to the U.S. in 2009 as a teenager. She is the CEO of Captozyme, a company that developed an enzyme to degrade oxalates, a key component of kidney stones and possibly the source of other problems for the body.
Blood Test to Detect Traumatic Brain Injury
Oct 3, 2018 • 15 min
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is hard to detect, and is sometimes called the “invisible injury.” Ron Hayes and Nancy Denslow, both scientists at the McKnight Brain Institute and the founders of Banyan Biomarkers, have developed a blood-based test that wi…
Using Salamander Tissue to Repair Human Skin
Sep 25, 2018 • 15 min
Jonelle Toothman has done a lot. A former Division 1 soccer player, Journalism major, and Army brat, she also co-founded NextGen Biologics and became its CEO. The company uses salamander tissue as an architecture for regenerative medicine to help burn…
Ceramic Material That Can Grow With Bones
Sep 25, 2018 • 23 min
In 1969, Professor Larry Hench developed a glass that can grow with bones. His close friend and colleague, David Greenspan, helped Professor Hench develop the material into BioGlass, a product that is used in orthopedic and dental bone graft materials….
Using Sharkskin to Fight Bacterial Growth
Sep 25, 2018 • 22 min
One of nine children, Dr. Anthony (Tony) Brennan grew up in a small town in upstate New York. He invented a way to inhibit bacterial growth through plastic sheets that are comprised of millions of microscopic features arranged in a diamond pattern -…