KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme
How Shaving Your Lady Bits Became A Thing
Sep 21 • 48 min
From unwanted hair to foul smells, there are many things we sometimes find icky about ourselves. Mara Altman joins us to talk about the untold history of why we hate our bodies, which she writes about in“Gross Anatomy: Dispatches from the Front and…
The True Story Of A Woman Buffalo Soldier
Sep 20 • 48 min
When the Civil War upended Cathy Williams’ world, the newly-freed woman made the incredible choice to disguise herself as a man and fight with the famed Buffalo Soldiers. Texas novelist Sarah Bird joins us to tell Williams’ story which is also the subject…
Sally Field As Herself
Sep 20 • 47 min
Sally Field is one of the most recognizable actors of her generation. She’s tackled countless roles from television’s Gidget to complex characters like Sybil and Mary Todd Lincoln on the big screen. The Academy Award winner joins us to reveal a character…
Forget The Planet – The Economics Of Fracking May Not Work
Sep 19 • 48 min
Boom and bust cycles are nothing new in the oil business – something Texas oil producers know well. And new extraction techniques like fracking have promised huge future gains for the industry. Investigative journalist Bethany McLean joins us to discuss…
Why So Many Parents Spy On Their Teens
Sep 19 • 48 min
Smartphones have made communication faster and easier than ever for moms and dads trying to keep up with busy teens. And services like location tracking offer even more information to worried parents. But is there a downside to knowing where a child is…
How Do You Steal A Dinosaur?
Sep 19 • 48 min
Everybody likes fossils. From shark’s teeth to small limestone shells, fossils are neat to hunt and collect. New Yorker staff writer Paige Williams joins us to talk about what happens when fossil hunters go big – Tyrannosaurus big – and run afoul of…
Reinventing Identity: South Asian Americans
Sep 18 • 48 min
South Asians comprise one of the fastest growing immigrant groups in America – building careers in fields like science, technology, business and more recently public service and pop culture. Journalist Yudhijit Bhattacharjee joins us to explore how this…
This Is Not Your Mother’s Girl Scouts
Sep 17 • 48 min
Growing up in Las Cruces, New Mexico, Sylvia Acevedo would play with a kaleidoscope in her back yard and dream big. She realized those dreams as one of the first Latina women to graduate with a master’s in engineering from Stanford University and to…
How We Catch Genes From Other Species
Sep 17 • 48 min
Through research spanning the last four decades, scientists have discovered that our DNA isn’t just inherited from ancestors. In fact about eight percent of the human genome comes from viruses. Science journalist David Quammen joins us to explore…
Why Humans Are The Most Successful Animal
Sep 14 • 48 min
Humans are unique – and not just in our own eyes. We’re the only species to both completely dominate the planet and simultaneously jeopardize our own ability to survive. Seth Fletcher, chief features editor for Scientific American Magazine, joins us to…
DeRay McKesson: A Voice From Ferguson
Sep 13 • 48 min
DeRay McKesson was on the ground in Ferguson, Mo., as protestors raged following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. And yet, his outlook is optimistic when it comes to healing America’s racial divides. He joins us to make the case that there’s a path to…
Citizen Students: Rights In Schools
Sep 13 • 48 min
A lot of kids first learn about the law in school. And if they study hard enough, they’ll learn that as students they’re often stripped of their Constitutional rights. University of Chicago law professor Justin Driver joins us to talk about how corporal…
The Wars We Couldn’t Win
Sep 12 • 48 min
New York Times reporter C.J. Chivers has covered war in Afghanistan and Iraq for more than a decade. The Pulitzer Prize winner joins us to tell the stories of these conflicts through the eyes of the U.S. military members fighting them, which he writes…
One Woman’s Fight Against Honor Killings
Sep 12 • 48 min
As a teenager growing up in Pakistan, Khalida Brohi’s life changed when she learned that her uncle had killed her female cousin in a so-called honor killing. Brohi joins us to talk about how that moment vaulted her into a life of activism to empower…
A Man Born At 30
Sep 11 • 48 min
What’s the relationship between masculinity and violence? The question was on the mind of Thomas Page McBee, a trans man who took up boxing as a way of exploring the connection. He joins us to talk about what he learned, which he writes about in“Amateur:…
Are Asian Americans The New White People?
Sep 11 • 48 min
A string of recent court cases have been based on the claim that Asian Americans are victims of reverse discrimination in hiring and college admissions. Journalist Iris Kuo joins us to talk about how these cases are raising questions about privilege and…
Who Are You? Labels Matter
Sep 10 • 48 min
Each week, Kwame Anthony Appiah helps readers of The New York Times with their moral quandaries as the paper’s Ethicist columnist. He joins us to further explore how we see ourselves in relation to one another, which he writes about in“The Lies That Bind:…
Go Ahead. Major in Philosophy
Sep 10 • 48 min
The number of students majoring in the humanities has declined dramatically in the last decade. Northeastern University assistant professor Benjamin Schmidt joins us to talk about the importance of studying literature, philosophy and related pursuits –…
The Woman Behind The Iran Nuclear Deal
Sep 7 • 48 min
Wendy Sherman served in the state department under President Clinton and President Obama, rising to Deputy Secretary of State. She joins us to talk about negotiating deals with North Korea and Iran – and about how we can apply the tools of diplomacy to…
How We Decide Stuff
Sep 6 • 48 min
Some of the biggest decisions in life are also the ones we’re least equipped to make. Steven Johnson joins us to talk about how the most effective decision-makers expertly consider the future outcomes of their choices, which he writes about in…
Not All Twitter Mobs Are Created Equal
Sep 6 • 48 min
A passionate group on Twitter can kill a promising movie project and get prominent people fired. Should social media, though, be the judge and jury on important issues? Amanda Hess writes about internet culture for The New York Times, and she joins us to…
How White Kids Learn About Race
Sep 5 • 48 min
American kids are listening in on a national conversation about race that’s more nuanced than in previous generations. Mississippi State sociologist Margaret Hagerman joins us to talk specifically about how white children learn about race – and about how…
How Walls Enable Peace (And When They Don’t)
Sep 5 • 48 min
A common thread that runs throughout the history of humanity is the desire to build barriers that separate us from those we think aren’t like us. Historian David Frye joins us to talk about the purposes served by Hadrian’s Wall, the Great Wall of China…
What Houston Learned From Harvey
Sep 4 • 48 min
A year ago this week, much of Houston was under water as residents surveyed the damage of Hurricane Harvey. Texas Monthly executive editor Mimi Swartz joins us to talk about lessons learned from the disaster, which she writes about this month for the…
It’s Not Your Homework: Advice For Parents
Sep 4 • 48 min
Raising children can be one of the most fulfilling experiences in a person’s life – and also one of the hardest. Parenting expert KJ Dell’Antonia joins us to talk about some of the most common stresses parents face – and how to ease them. Her new book is…
A New Face, A New Beginning
Sep 4 • 48 min
Last year, a 21-year-old patient at the Cleveland Clinic became the youngest ever recipient of a full-face transplant. National Geographic documented the 31-hour procedure, and Joanna Connors joins us to walk through the miraculous transformation. Her…
Helping Others (Unless It Hurts You)
Aug 30 • 48 min
The elite among us talk a big game when it comes to equality and justice – so long as it doesn’t threaten their place in the world order. Anand Giridharadas joins us to talk about the hypocrisy at play in our conversations about equality – and about how…
Rethinking Sex Education
Aug 30 • 48 min
Most parents dread having to finally have The Talk with their children, primarily because there’s no definitive way to talk about love and sex. Bonnie J. Rough joins us to offer some insights into how we might better communicate the facts of life to the…
The Case For More Radical Movements
Aug 29 • 48 min
Grassroots movements come in many forms – and some are more successful than others. Charlene A Carruthers joins us to talk about strategies social justice activists can adopt to accomplish their missions. Her book is called “Unapologetic: A Black, Queer,…
The Fifty Year Path To The Gig Economy
Aug 29 • 49 min
The standard thinking goes that the 2008 recession plus a more sophisticated internet led to the gig economy. Louis Hyman joins us to talk about how decisions made by business leaders as early as the 1950s actually laid the foundation for where we are…
Within The Margin Of Error: How Polling Really Works
Aug 28 • 48 min
With the midterm elections just a few months away, each new week will bring a new poll breaking down the campaigns. CBS News Director of Elections and Surveys Anthony Salvanto joins us to talk about how this data is collected – and about what happens when…
The Last Gasp For Organized Labor
Aug 28 • 49 min
Cases involving labor unions have been argued before the Supreme Court in recent years. Garret Keizer joins us to talk about how organized labor has mostly been weakened by these decisions – and about what workers can do to strengthen their position. His…
The Girls Left Behind By Mexican Migration
Aug 27 • 48 min
For decades, Mexican men have been recruited as temporary laborers in the U.S., working in fields, factories and in the service industry. That migration has left the young women they leave behind in a state of uncertainty. Lilia Soto of the University of…
The Dilemma Over Who Is – And Isn’t – Native American
Aug 27 • 49 min
The Lumbee tribe in North Carolina has struggled for decades to be recognized by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. Without federal recognition, the Lumbee are denied sovereignty, their own land and benefits granted to other tribes. Journalist Lisa Rab…
Sorry, Thurgood Marshall: Girls Integrated Schools
Aug 23 • 48 min
During the earliest days of desegregation, black girls outnumbered boys as volunteers to attend all-white schools by a wide margin. Rachel Devlin joins guest host John McCaa to tell the stories of these Civil Rights pioneers. Her new book is called “A…
Why Everybody Lies About Education
Aug 22 • 47 min
Arne Duncan served in the Obama administration as the Secretary of Education. He joins guest host John McCaa to talk about strategies for improving our public schools, which he writes about in “How Schools Work: An Inside Account of Failure and Success…
The Spanish Civil War Still Isn’t Over
Aug 21 • 48 min
Across the U.S., cities are struggling with how we should publicly remember Civil War leaders. And a similar conversation is happening in Spain. Alex Palmer joins guest host John McCaa to talk about how the European nation is divided over how to…
Is The First Alzheimer’s Survivor Living Among Us?
Aug 20 • 48 min
For decades, scientists have believed that the nervous system and the immune system operated independent of one another – the former running the body and the second protecting it. University of Virginia neuroscientist Jonathan Kipnis joins guest host John…
A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance
Aug 17 • 49 min
In a special program, “A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance,” KERA’s Think and The California Report team up to examine the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, the crackdown on immigration, and the separation of families who attempted…
Does Democracy Still Work? Americans Weigh In
Aug 16 • 48 min
Democracy is government by the people. So how do the people feel about the state of our democracy? That’s the question researchers with the Bush Institute and Penn Biden Center explored in a recent poll. Lindsay Lloyd, deputy director of human rights at…
This Indian American Life
Aug 16 • 48 min
Neel Patel grew up the son of Indian immigrants, with one foot in America and one planted firmly in the old country. He joins us to talk about how that experience informs his debut collection of short stories – and about the lack of Indian characters in…
Why Screens And Books Require Different Reading Skills
Aug 15 • 48 min
Learning to read is a process that builds cognitive skills in children. So what happens when those skills are developed through digital reading instead of books? UCLA child development expert Maryanne Wolf joins us to talk about how reading digitally…
How To Talk To Someone Who’s Wrong
Aug 15 • 48 min
Having a conversation with people on the other side of the political spectrum can feel like a waste of time. And so we wall ourselves in through our friend groups and social media feeds. Justin Lee joins us to talk about strategies for actually engaging…
How Houston Became The Beating Heart Of Cardiac Care
Aug 14 • 48 min
For more than 50 years, the medical community has tried to create an artificial heart. Texas Monthly executive editor Mimi Swartz joins us to talk about the challenges of creating a heart – and why the only option for patients in need of one remains a…
A Former U.S. Ambassador To Russia Speaks Out
Aug 14 • 48 min
For three years, Michael McFaul served as the Obama administration’s ambassador to Russia. And he made headlines when President Trump suggested he might be willing to allow Kremlin officials to interrogate the former ambassador following the Helsinki…
What If We Just Let Wildfires Burn?
Aug 13 • 48 min
Officials in California are warning that the largest of the state’s wildfires won’t be contained until September. The fires have already consumed hundreds of thousands of acres of land and caused billions of dollars in damages. Richard Manning joins us to…
The Racial Message Of Public Monuments
Aug 13 • 48 min
Cities across America are struggling with what to do with their monuments to Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and other leaders of the Confederacy. University of Pittsburgh historian Kirk Savage joins us to talk about that question – and…
Not Quite GMO: The Future Of Mutant Food
Aug 10 • 48 min
As the world’s population edges closer to 8 billion, scientists are at work figuring out how to feed all those mouths. Stephen Hall joins us to talk about how gene editing may be the solution. His story “CRISPR Can Speed Up Nature: And Change How We Grow…
That Time We Could Have Fixed Global Warming
Aug 9 • 48 min
In the 1980s, scientists began to thoroughly understand the potential dangers of climate change. Nathaniel Rich joins us to talk about the many reasons why that understanding wasn’t put into action – and how that delay has only increased the pressure on…
What Makes A Country A Country
Aug 9 • 48 min
The map of the world feels fairly settled. There are a number of spots across the globe, however, that operate like countries without formal recognition. Slate staff writer Joshua Keating joins us to talk about these self-proclaimed nations, which he…
Texans Weigh In On Healthcare And Politics
Aug 8 • 48 min
Incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz leads challenger Beto O’Rourke by just two points. That’s according to this year’s Texas Lyceum poll, released last week. Joshua Blank oversaw the polling, and he joins us to talk about the political climate in Texas – and about…
One Man’s Crusade To Cure HIV
Aug 7 • 48 min
Dr. Joseph Lange may well have been on the cusp of ending HIV when his Malaysian Airlines flight was shot down by pro-Russian rebels in 2014. Dr. Seema Yasmin joins us to talk about Lange’s research into how the virus is transferred from mother to child –…
The World May Be Running Out Of Sand. Seriously.
Aug 7 • 48 min
A grain of sand may seem inconsequential. But these tiny specs are the building blocks for everything from roads to computers. Vince Beiser joins us to talk about the importance of sand as a natural resource – and about the very real possibility that we…
The Power Of A Humble Leader
Aug 6 • 48 min
As CEO of Dallas-basedCitySquare, Larry James is a leader in the fight against poverty. He joins us to talk about why effective leaders focus their efforts on the people they manage and serve. His new book is called“House Rules: Insights for Innovative…
For Profit Colleges: Cost More And Worth Less?
Aug 6 • 48 min
Tressie McMillan Cottom was once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges. She joins us to talk about why these institutions often contribute to economic inequality, which she writes about in“Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New…
Why A Lake On Mars Is Such A Big Deal
Aug 3 • 48 min
Italian researchers recently discovered what they believe to be a lake on Mars. Steve Clifford of the Planetary Science Institute joins us to talk about the significance of the discovery on a planet previously thought to only contain ice – and about what…
A Queer Black Man Finds Freedom
Aug 2 • 48 min
When Darnell Moore was 14, a group of boys doused him with gasoline and tried lighting a match – only to be thwarted by a windy day. As a teen, Moore was bullied constantly for being different. He joins us to talk about the struggles of growing up black…
How Free Money Would Free People
Aug 2 • 48 min
What if all Americans, regardless of their tax brackets, received a monthly check from the government to cover basic living expenses? Annie Lowrey of The Atlantic joins us to make the case for a universal basic income, which she writes about in “Give…
Finding Yourself In A Foreign Country
Aug 1 • 48 min
When young, American women dream of finding themselves in a foreign country, it’s usually an “Eat, Pray, Love” style trip. Audrey Murray joins us to talk about how she skipped the well-worn enlightenment path in favor of a tour of former Soviet republics,…
An Economic Case For Immigration
Aug 1 • 48 min
The U.S. birthrate hit an all-time low last year. And if that trend continues, the lack of a robust work force will start to drag the economy down. George Mason University professor Jack Goldstone joins us to make an economic case for loosening up…
Killing Them Softly: A History Of Poison
Jul 31 • 48 min
Russia and North Korea have each been accused in recent years of poisoning people deemed enemies of the state. Eleanor Herman joins us to talk about how the practice dates back centuries and has been used by nations all over the world. Her new book is…
What Happens With Families At The Border
Jul 31 • 48 min
A federal judge ruled this month that 1,600 families separated at the border must be reunited. Frontline correspondent Martin Smith joins us to tell the story of these children who entered the U.S. with their parents only to be detained elsewhere. The…
The World Of Whales
Jul 30 • 42 min
Whales can weigh up to 300,000 pounds and live for 200 years or more. Nick Pyenson is the curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington. He joins us to talk about how whales evolved from…
What TV News Didn’t Tell You About Ferguson
Jul 30 • 48 min
Four years ago, Michael Brown was shot and killed by police, setting off days of protests in Ferguson, Mo. Protesters captured the fallout with cellphone cameras, and Sabaah Folayan joins us to talk about turning that bystander footage into a portrait of…
Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novelist Andrew Sean Greer
Jul 26 • 48 min
Andrew Sean Greer won the Pulitzer Prize this year for his novel “Less” (Little, Brown and Company). He joins us to talk about his humorous tale of a writer on the edge of 50 who literally travels the world in an effort to avoid an awkward encounter with…
Becoming A Tech Billionaire Is Harder Than You Think
Jul 26 • 48 min
Silicon Valley is the new Las Vegas, filled with hopeful entrepreneurs hoping to hit the jackpot. Corey Pein became one of them in order to uncover the truth and the lies of the tech industry. He joins us to talk about the experience, which he writes…
A Refugee Wins The Immigration Lottery
Jul 25 • 48 min
As a child, Abdi Nor Iftin was obsessed with American culture – even before U.S. Marines arrived in his native Somalia to battle the country’s warlords. He joins us to tell his amazing story of fleeing Mogadishu for Kenya, winning an American visa in a…
Maybe We Evolved To Be Internet Trolls
Jul 24 • 48 min
If you’re searching for humanity at its worst, online is a good place to look. Notre Dame anthropologist Agustín Fuentes joins us to talk about how some of our terrible social media behavior is actually partly a result of our evolution. His story“Are We…
Bouncing Back From Trauma
Jul 24 • 48 min
Most of us will encounter a traumatic event in our lives. They’re often unavoidable, but what we can control is how we react to them. Psychiatrist Dennis Charney joins us to talk about bouncing back from life’s worst moments. He’s a co-author…
Why Being White Makes You Racist
Jul 23 • 48 min
When confronted with racist behavior, white people can exhibit a range of emotions – including anger, fear and guilt. Robin DiAngelo joins us to talk about how these behaviors get in the way of meaningful interracial dialogue, which she writes about…
Is Privacy Still Possible?
Jul 23 • 48 min
How much of ourselves are we obligated to share with others, and what do we have a right to keep hidden? Sarah Igo of Vanderbilt University joins us to talk about those questions and others, which she explores in her new book“The Known Citizen: A History…
News Or Editorial: Can You Tell The Difference?
Jul 20 • 48 min
Both Republicans and Democrats are more likely to classify a news statement as factual if it favors their side – that’s according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. Jeffrey Gottfried, senior researcher at Pew, co-authored “Distinguishing Between…
Finding Purpose In Prison
Jul 19 • 48 min
As a 19-year-old, Donna Hylton made a terrible mistake – one that landed her a 25-year prison sentence. She joins us to talk about how spending time with other inmates helped her to come to terms with her abusive upbringing, which she writes about in“A…
The Terrorist Turned Informant
Jul 18 • 48 min
Aimen Dean was an early member of al-Qaeda, working alongside founder Osama bin Laden himself. He joins us to talk about his decision to switch allegiances and provide information to Britain’s intelligence services, which he writes about in “Nine Lives:…
How Society Fails Trans Kids
Jul 18 • 48 min
Children as young as 2 years old can find themselves at odds with the gender assigned to them at birth. Sociologist Ann Travers joins us to talk about the experience of transgender kids – and about how parents can guide their discovery. Travers’ book is…
Immigrants On Their Earliest Memories Of America
Jul 17 • 48 min
The First Days Project invites United States immigrants to document their earliest memories of their new home – what scared them, what surprised them and what they found confusing. Samip Mallick runs the project, and he joins us to talk about what can be…
Who You Should (And Shouldn’t) Trust For Health Advice
Jul 17 • 48 min
Medical research can be nuanced, inconclusive or just plain tricky to explain clearly. University of Pennsylvania professor Paul Offit joins us to talk about how people with agendas often take scientific studies and twist the information to suit their…
In An Era of Change, Evangelicals Still Rule
Jul 16 • 48 min
As America becomes more and more diverse, white evangelical voters showed in 2016 that candidates they back still win elections. University of Maryland political scientist Janelle S. Wong joins us to talk about the future of evangelical voting as…
Rethinking Our Relationship With Animals
Jul 16 • 48 min
Animals serve humans as laborers, food sources and, in some cases, companions. Michigan State law professor David Favre joins us to think through our evolving relationship with our fellow inhabitants of Earth, which he writes about in “Respecting Animals:…
Lessons From the Opioid Epidemic
Jul 13 • 48 min
When parents are addicted to opioids, it’s often their children who pay the biggest price. In West Virginia, 6,300 kids are in the foster care system — nearly half because of their parents’ substance-abuse problems. Zoë Carpenter visited the state to…
The Doctor Who Exposed The Flint Water Crisis
Jul 12 • 48 min
A few years back, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha felt perfectly comfortable telling parents it was fine for their kids to drink the town’s water. Flint, Michigan was a part of America, wasn’t it? She joins us to tell the story of how she evolved from passive…
Cheaters: Why Women And Men Stray
Jul 12 • 48 min
When a spouse cheats, it often means the end of the relationship. Dr. Kenneth Rosenberg joins us to talk about the three types of cheating, why they’re so prevalent and how we can overcome them. His new book is called “Infidelity: Why Men and Women Cheat”…
Why Do We Care If A Boy Wears A Dress?
Jul 11 • 48 min
Young women are taught that they need to be assertive, strong and brave in a world dominated by men. So why doesn’t it work the other way? Sarah Rich joins us to talk about why we should also be teaching boys how to be nurturing, caring and other traits…
Everybody’s Insecure And That’s OK
Jul 11 • 48 min
If you’re someone who would rather die than talk to a stranger, you’re not alone – about 40 percent of us consider ourselves shy. Psychologist Ellen Hendriksen joins us to talk about how we can overcome our fear of interacting with other people. Her new…
Partners Forever: How The U.S. And Mexico Rely On Each Other
Jul 10 • 48 min
Mexican president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador won the race in part by vowing to stand up to President Trump. Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute, joins us to talk about the strained U.S.-Mexico relationship – and about what it…
New Urbanism in North Texas
Jul 10 • 48 min
As North Texas’ population has boomed, accommodating the ever-increasing traffic has been a challenge. But what if cars took a backseat to actual people? We talk about how we should rethink our most densely-populated urban areas with DART board member…
How Snapchat Changed Two Families
Jul 9 • 48 min
Emily Giffin’s novels, including “Something Borrowed” and “Heart of the Matter,” are mainstays on bestsellers lists. She joins us to talk about her latest effort, “All We Ever Wanted” (Ballentine), which centers on a high school scandal that rocks…
Bringing ‘Hairspray’ To The Stage
Jul 9 • 48 min
The musical “Hairspray” follows Tracy Turnblad, a Baltimore teen who dreams of dancing on a 1960s TV show. “Hairspray” is being produced by the Dallas Theater Center, and we talk with director Joel Ferrell and Michelle Dowdy – who plays Tracy – about the…
Why Honor Can Save Us
Jul 5 • 48 min
What role does honor play in how a society functions? University of Houston philosopher Tamler Sommers joins us to make the case that living a more honorable life is the key to solving many of the nation’s problems. His new book is called “Why Honor…
How Superpowers Fight Today
Jul 3 • 48 min
The U.S. isn’t involved in armed conflict with Russia, China or Iran. War is being waged, though, through the use of cyber weapons. New York Times national security correspondent David Sanger joins us to talk about how the world’s superpowers are engaging…
A Look At The Supreme Court’s Rulings And Its Future
Jul 3 • 48 min
The United States Supreme Court has ruled recently on everything from who has to bake a cake to who has to pay union dues to who can travel to the U.S. And now the search for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy’s replacement begins. SMU Constitutional Law…
The Life Of Eunice Kennedy Shriver
Jul 2 • 48 min
With a senator, attorney general and president among their ranks, the men of the Kennedy family had an enormous influence on 20th Century America. Eileen McNamara joins us to make the case that it was actually a Kennedy woman – Special Olympics founder…
The Melting Away Of The Middle Class
Jun 29 • 48 min
For a nation that preaches the importance of families, we haven’t done a very good job of caring for them. Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, joins us to talk about why increases in the costs of health care,…
Hormones Are More Than Just Sex
Jun 28 • 48 min
Hormones contribute a lot to our lives – from controlling our metabolisms and emotions to guiding the survival of the species. And yet scientists are still learning about these curious chemicals. Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein joins guest host Courtney Collins…
Have Elite Athletes Hit Their Peak?
Jun 28 • 48 min
When athletes break a world record, it’s usually by a fraction of a second or a quarter of an inch. So how much further can we push ourselves? USA Today sports columnist Christine Brennan joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how scientists and…
The Western Roots Of Extremism
Jun 27 • 48 min
Journalist Souad Mekhennet has interviewed some of the top operatives in Al-Qaida, the Taliban and ISIS. A Muslim woman who was born and raised in Germany, Mekhennet sees her reporting as a way to bridge cultures that often misunderstand each other. She…
Blocks, Blackboards And The Development Of Kids
Jun 26 • 48 min
From dolls and race cars to blocks and water guns, kids today play with a lot of the same toys their parents did. Design critic Alexandra Lange joins guest host of Courtney Collins to talk about what parents should be thinking about when considering which…
Why Savings Don’t Equal Retirement Security
Jun 25 • 50 min
For many American workers, the plan for retirement is to save as much as possible and hope you don’t outlive it. Brookings Institution economist Martin Neil Baily joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how to better navigate advisory fees,…
Does Everything Really Need To Be Funny?
Jun 25 • 48 min
As we’ve evolved as a species, so has our sense of humor. Ken Jennings joins guest host Courtney Collins to trace how we’ve developed into a culture that prizes humor over more traditionally appreciated traits like strength and wisdom. His new book is…
How TV And Movies Keep Women In Their Place
Jun 22 • 48 min
As a girl growing up in the 1970s and ‘80s, Carina Chocano was bombarded with sexed-up Barbies, princesses in need of saving and an endless string of housewives on television. She joins us to talk about how girls absorb images from popular culture into…