KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme
News Or Editorial: Can You Tell The Difference?
Jul 20 • 48 min
Both Republicans and Democrats are more likely to classify a news statement as factual if it favors their side – that’s according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. Jeffrey Gottfried, senior researcher at Pew, co-authored “Distinguishing Between…
Finding Purpose In Prison
Jul 19 • 48 min
As a 19-year-old, Donna Hylton made a terrible mistake – one that landed her a 25-year prison sentence. She joins us to talk about how spending time with other inmates helped her to come to terms with her abusive upbringing, which she writes about in“A…
The Terrorist Turned Informant
Jul 18 • 48 min
Aimen Dean was an early member of al-Qaeda, working alongside founder Osama bin Laden himself. He joins us to talk about his decision to switch allegiances and provide information to Britain’s intelligence services, which he writes about in “Nine Lives:…
How Society Fails Trans Kids
Jul 18 • 48 min
Children as young as 2 years old can find themselves at odds with the gender assigned to them at birth. Sociologist Ann Travers joins us to talk about the experience of transgender kids – and about how parents can guide their discovery. Travers’ book is…
Immigrants On Their Earliest Memories Of America
Jul 17 • 48 min
The First Days Project invites United States immigrants to document their earliest memories of their new home – what scared them, what surprised them and what they found confusing. Samip Mallick runs the project, and he joins us to talk about what can be…
Who You Should (And Shouldn’t) Trust For Health Advice
Jul 17 • 48 min
Medical research can be nuanced, inconclusive or just plain tricky to explain clearly. University of Pennsylvania professor Paul Offit joins us to talk about how people with agendas often take scientific studies and twist the information to suit their…
In An Era of Change, Evangelicals Still Rule
Jul 16 • 48 min
As America becomes more and more diverse, white evangelical voters showed in 2016 that candidates they back still win elections. University of Maryland political scientist Janelle S. Wong joins us to talk about the future of evangelical voting as…
Rethinking Our Relationship With Animals
Jul 16 • 48 min
Animals serve humans as laborers, food sources and, in some cases, companions. Michigan State law professor David Favre joins us to think through our evolving relationship with our fellow inhabitants of Earth, which he writes about in “Respecting Animals:…
Lessons From the Opioid Epidemic
Jul 13 • 48 min
When parents are addicted to opioids, it’s often their children who pay the biggest price. In West Virginia, 6,300 kids are in the foster care system — nearly half because of their parents’ substance-abuse problems. Zoë Carpenter visited the state to…
The Doctor Who Exposed The Flint Water Crisis
Jul 12 • 48 min
A few years back, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha felt perfectly comfortable telling parents it was fine for their kids to drink the town’s water. Flint, Michigan was a part of America, wasn’t it? She joins us to tell the story of how she evolved from passive…
Cheaters: Why Women And Men Stray
Jul 12 • 48 min
When a spouse cheats, it often means the end of the relationship. Dr. Kenneth Rosenberg joins us to talk about the three types of cheating, why they’re so prevalent and how we can overcome them. His new book is called “Infidelity: Why Men and Women Cheat”…
Why Do We Care If A Boy Wears A Dress?
Jul 11 • 48 min
Young women are taught that they need to be assertive, strong and brave in a world dominated by men. So why doesn’t it work the other way? Sarah Rich joins us to talk about why we should also be teaching boys how to be nurturing, caring and other traits…
Everybody’s Insecure And That’s OK
Jul 11 • 48 min
If you’re someone who would rather die than talk to a stranger, you’re not alone – about 40 percent of us consider ourselves shy. Psychologist Ellen Hendriksen joins us to talk about how we can overcome our fear of interacting with other people. Her new…
Partners Forever: How The U.S. And Mexico Rely On Each Other
Jul 10 • 48 min
Mexican president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador won the race in part by vowing to stand up to President Trump. Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute, joins us to talk about the strained U.S.-Mexico relationship – and about what it…
New Urbanism in North Texas
Jul 10 • 48 min
As North Texas’ population has boomed, accommodating the ever-increasing traffic has been a challenge. But what if cars took a backseat to actual people? We talk about how we should rethink our most densely-populated urban areas with DART board member…
How Snapchat Changed Two Families
Jul 9 • 48 min
Emily Giffin’s novels, including “Something Borrowed” and “Heart of the Matter,” are mainstays on bestsellers lists. She joins us to talk about her latest effort, “All We Ever Wanted” (Ballentine), which centers on a high school scandal that rocks…
Bringing ‘Hairspray’ To The Stage
Jul 9 • 48 min
The musical “Hairspray” follows Tracy Turnblad, a Baltimore teen who dreams of dancing on a 1960s TV show. “Hairspray” is being produced by the Dallas Theater Center, and we talk with director Joel Ferrell and Michelle Dowdy – who plays Tracy – about the…
Why Honor Can Save Us
Jul 5 • 48 min
What role does honor play in how a society functions? University of Houston philosopher Tamler Sommers joins us to make the case that living a more honorable life is the key to solving many of the nation’s problems. His new book is called “Why Honor…
How Superpowers Fight Today
Jul 3 • 48 min
The U.S. isn’t involved in armed conflict with Russia, China or Iran. War is being waged, though, through the use of cyber weapons. New York Times national security correspondent David Sanger joins us to talk about how the world’s superpowers are engaging…
A Look At The Supreme Court’s Rulings And Its Future
Jul 3 • 48 min
The United States Supreme Court has ruled recently on everything from who has to bake a cake to who has to pay union dues to who can travel to the U.S. And now the search for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy’s replacement begins. SMU Constitutional Law…
The Life Of Eunice Kennedy Shriver
Jul 2 • 48 min
With a senator, attorney general and president among their ranks, the men of the Kennedy family had an enormous influence on 20th Century America. Eileen McNamara joins us to make the case that it was actually a Kennedy woman – Special Olympics founder…
The Melting Away Of The Middle Class
Jun 29 • 48 min
For a nation that preaches the importance of families, we haven’t done a very good job of caring for them. Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, joins us to talk about why increases in the costs of health care,…
Hormones Are More Than Just Sex
Jun 28 • 48 min
Hormones contribute a lot to our lives – from controlling our metabolisms and emotions to guiding the survival of the species. And yet scientists are still learning about these curious chemicals. Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein joins guest host Courtney Collins…
Have Elite Athletes Hit Their Peak?
Jun 28 • 48 min
When athletes break a world record, it’s usually by a fraction of a second or a quarter of an inch. So how much further can we push ourselves? USA Today sports columnist Christine Brennan joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how scientists and…
The Western Roots Of Extremism
Jun 27 • 48 min
Journalist Souad Mekhennet has interviewed some of the top operatives in Al-Qaida, the Taliban and ISIS. A Muslim woman who was born and raised in Germany, Mekhennet sees her reporting as a way to bridge cultures that often misunderstand each other. She…
Blocks, Blackboards And The Development Of Kids
Jun 26 • 48 min
From dolls and race cars to blocks and water guns, kids today play with a lot of the same toys their parents did. Design critic Alexandra Lange joins guest host of Courtney Collins to talk about what parents should be thinking about when considering which…
Why Savings Don’t Equal Retirement Security
Jun 25 • 50 min
For many American workers, the plan for retirement is to save as much as possible and hope you don’t outlive it. Brookings Institution economist Martin Neil Baily joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how to better navigate advisory fees,…
Does Everything Really Need To Be Funny?
Jun 25 • 48 min
As we’ve evolved as a species, so has our sense of humor. Ken Jennings joins guest host Courtney Collins to trace how we’ve developed into a culture that prizes humor over more traditionally appreciated traits like strength and wisdom. His new book is…
How TV And Movies Keep Women In Their Place
Jun 22 • 48 min
As a girl growing up in the 1970s and ‘80s, Carina Chocano was bombarded with sexed-up Barbies, princesses in need of saving and an endless string of housewives on television. She joins us to talk about how girls absorb images from popular culture into…
Drones: A Tool, A Toy, A Threat?
Jun 21 • 48 min
About 3 million drones were sold worldwide in 2017. And they’re used by everyone from amateur photographers to marine biologists to military strategists. Alex Fitzpatrick of Time magazine joins us to talk about the many ways that these machines have…
David Sedaris Wanders The World
Jun 21 • 48 min
David Sedaris’ best-selling books have allowed him a comfortable life, including a beach house on the North Carolina coast. And it’s at that house that he did much of the reflection that goes into his new book, “Calypso.” He joins us to talk about his…
No Place To Call Home
Jun 20 • 48 min
When refugees leave their homes, they’re gambling that some place new will welcome them. Viet Thanh Nguyen knows that experience well as a refugee from Vietnam after the fall of Saigon. On World Refugee Day, he joins us to talk about the many obstacles…
Refugees Are More Than Their Struggles
Jun 20 • 47 min
Clemantine Wamaryia and her sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan genocide and wandered the African continent for six years before finally landing in Chicago. Once in the United States, Clemantine flourished while Claire struggled. Clemantine joins us to talk…
What You’re Eating Probably Isn’t Food
Jun 19 • 50 min
The rise of industrial farming and food processing has changed our diets. And if you are what you eat, then these methods have also changed us. Kristin Lawless joins us to talk about why mass production has led to less healthy foods – and about how we can…
Forever A Temp
Jun 19 • 48 min
Workers are less tied to their employers these days than ever. That’s great for mobility, and not so good for anyone looking for a stable life. Sarah Kessler joins us to talk about how the gig economy is transforming the places people live, the hours they…
Every Conflict Does Have A Solution
Jun 18 • 48 min
Even good-faith negotiations can sometimes end in a standstill. So what next? Daniel Shapiro, founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program, joins us to talk about how we often let our emotions and identities get in the way of…
Straddling The Border: The Lives Of Mexican Americans
Jun 18 • 48 min
The Mexican population in the U.S. has skyrocketed in the last 40 years – from about 700,000 in the 1970s to more than 35 million today. Alfredo Corchado immigrated in 1987, and he joins us to tell his story – and the story of how Mexicans have changed…
The Power Of Oprah
Jun 15 • 48 min
Since opening its doors in 2016, theNational Museum of African American History and Culturehas been one of the hottest tickets in Washington. We take a tour of the new exhibition“Watching Oprah: The Oprah Winfrey Show and American Culture”with its…
How Portraits Capture People
Jun 14 • 48 min
Earlier this year, the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery unveiled official portraits of President Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama. And since then, other paintings of prominent figures in U.S. history have been added, including Henrietta…
Covering The White House
Jun 14 • 48 min
Today, President Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore. We talk about the historic summit – and the news of the day in Washington – with NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe and Abby Livingston of the Texas Tribune.
Fact Checking The News
Jun 13 • 48 min
Glenn Kessler has one of the toughest – and politically perilous – jobs in the media. As the Washington Post’s Fact Checker columnist, he analyzes what politicians say to discern who’s telling the truth and who’s muddying the waters. Kessler joins us to…
My 8 Years With Obama
Jun 13 • 48 min
As one of Barack Obama’s top aides, Ben Rhodes spent eight years in the White House working alongside the president. He joins us to talk about what it was like to wait out the Osama bin Laden raid, lead secret negotiations with other countries and serve…
James Clapper On The State Of Intelligence
Jun 12 • 48 min
James Clapper served as Director of National Intelligence under President Obama. And since leaving the post, he’s been a defender of the intelligence community while also talking about improvements that can be made. He joins us to reflect on his time…
The Stars Of NPR
Jun 12 • 48 min
It wouldn’t be a trip to NPR headquarters in Washington without a visit with a few familiar voices. We talk with Sam Sanders about his new show, “It’s Been a Minute with Sam Sanders;” Shankar Vedantam digs into recent discoveries on “Hidden Brain;” and…
The Purpose Of Pride
Jun 11 • 48 min
The first gay pride parade took place in 1970 in New York City. And this month, cities across the nation will continue the tradition. We talk about how these events have evolved with Vincent E. Slatt of the Rainbow History Project and Jade Salazar, a…
The Senate Race: Conversations With Cruz And O’Rourke
Jun 11 • 48 min
In November, Texans will go to the polls to decide if Republican Ted Cruz will serve a second term in the U.S. Senate or be replaced by Democrat Beto O’Rourke. Each candidate joins us to talk about their current legislative priorities – and why he should…
What You Can’t Learn In Medical School
Jun 8 • 48 min
Every day, doctors see people at the lowest moments in their lives. This hour, we talk with a trio of physicians about the human side of healing. Joining us are an E.R. doc who learned about critical care from her own emergency, a former resident who…
Young But Not Healthy
Jun 7 • 48 min
Young women face a lot of pressure as they begin their careers, find a mate and consider starting a family. And when those same women face serious illnesses, there’s extra pressure to pretend all is well. Michele Lent Hirsch is one of those women, and she…
When Black Athletes Take A Political Stand
Jun 7 • 48 min
Black athletes are some of today’s most vocal social critics – from Colin Kaepernick kneeling during the national anthem to LeBron James wearing an “I Can’t Breathe” T-shirt following Eric Garner’s death. ESPN senior writer Howard Bryant joins us to talk…
Why Renters Can’t Afford Rent
Jun 6 • 48 min
Almost half of all renters spend more than 30 percent of their income on rent. And with the lack of affordable housing, it’s no wonder more than 500,000 Americans spend the night on the streets. Bryce Covert joins us to talk about how our current…
Was the Colony Of Roanoke Really Lost?
Jun 6 • 48 min
In 1587, 115 people crossed the Atlantic from England to establish a colony off the coast of North Carolina. But when the colony’s leader, John White, returned after gathering supplies, he found not a soul in the camp. Andrew Lawler joins us to talk about…
Urban, Suburban and Rural: The Cultural Divide
Jun 5 • 48 min
If it feels as if America is in a state of flux, your intuition is correct. And much of that change can be credited to the way our population is shifting among rural, urban and suburban locations. Juliana Horowitz of the Pew Research Center joins us to…
Kids Today Really Are The Worst
Jun 4 • 48 min
Even the most well-behaved kids need a little disciplining every once in a while. Parenting expert Katherine Reynolds Lewis joins us to talk about effective strategies for correcting behavior. Her new book is called “The Good News About Bad Behavior: Why…
How American Meritocracy Favors The Already Rich
Jun 4 • 48 min
Americans generally agree on the importance of free speech, rewarding hard work and representative democracy. Steven Brill joins us to talk about how these foundational ideas – while still important – may also have contributed to some of our national…
Teaching Computers To Ask Why Will Change Everything
Jun 1 • 48 min
The mantra “correlation is not causation” has kept scientists away from what’s known as causal thinking. UCLA computer scientist Judea Pearl joins us to talk about why it’s actually OK for researchers to draw these connections – and how this type of…
The Sun Had A Mother
May 31 • 48 min
Did you know that the sun was likely once related to other stars? And that those “sibling” stars may now reside in other parts of the Milky Way? Science journalist Rebecca Boyle joins us to talk about how astronomers are gaining a better understanding of…
Our Seas Of Trash
May 31 • 48 min
Our planet is home to an estimated 6.9 billion tons of plastic waste. And it will take a minimum of 450 years for it to biodegrade – though some of it may never break down. Jenna Jambeck studies the problem at the University of Georgia, and she joins us…
Healthy People Also Hear Voices
May 30 • 48 min
Hearing voices has long been considered a sign of psychosis. Stanford sociologist T.M. Luhrmann joins us to talk about why a better understanding of how voices work in the brain might be a key to treating patients with mental illness. Her story “The Sound…
The Standoff Over Access To Public Lands
May 30 • 48 min
In 2016, Ammon Bundy was a fixture of news coverage as he led an armed standoff with federal agents at the headquarters of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. James Pogue was on the scene during the siege, and he joins us to talk about what it says…
Why Mom Said To Stop Slouching
May 29 • 48 min
People with good posture also have other positive qualities attributed to them. Emory University psychiatry professor Sander L. Gilman joins us to talk about how ideas from medicine, theology, sociology and a host of other fields have combined to…
Jake Tapper Writes Fiction, Too
May 29 • 48 min
Charlie Marder is a newly-minted congressman who stumbles upon a conspiracy that reaches all the way to the White House. Marder is the creation of Jake Tapper, who tells his story in his 1950s-era debut novel, “The Hellfire Club” (Little, Brown and…
Redefining Autism And Who’s Left Out
May 25 • 48 min
The “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders” sets the standards for how psychologists and psychiatrists should treat patients. Lina Zeldovich joins us to talk about how the latest revision of the manual may exclude some people on the…
You’ve Wasted Another Perfectly Good Hour — And That’s OK
May 25 • 48 min
True downtime – with no work, no television and definitely no phones – is a scarce resource. MIT professor Alan Lightman joins us to talk about the importance of allowing our minds to wander, which he writes about in his new book, “In Praise of Wasting…
Homeless Vets Are Women, Too
May 25 • 48 min
About 55,000 women who served in the U.S. military are homeless. Jas Boothe was one of them, and she joins us to talk about how female veterans are not cared for as well as their male counterparts – and about the “Ms. Veteran America” pageant, which is…
Syrian Refugees Are Still Dying
May 23 • 48 min
Every day, refugees are rescued while trying to cross the Mediterranean for a better life in Europe. As a pediatrician, Dr. Seema Jilani has been aboard those rescue boats, pulling people out of the water to save their lives. She joins us to talk about…
Come Together: A Guide To Better Parties And Meetings
May 23 • 48 min
Even if we like the people we’re around, so often our interfaces revolve around mindless small talk and boring meeting agendas. Priya Parker has studied how people around the world are making the most of the time they spend together, and she joins us to…
Are You Part Of The American Aristocracy?
May 21 • 48 min
The “1 percent” is the typical target for those upset by income inequality. Matthew Stewart joins us to talk about why that ire should be broadened to include a larger chunk of the populace. His story “The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy”…
Is Democracy Bad For Economic Growth?
May 21 • 48 min
The 20th Century growth of global democracy fostered a history-making economic boom for many. But stagnant wages and growing inequality over the last few decades have frustrated millions and inspired nationalist and protectionist political movements. In…
Inside The Life Of Robin Williams
May 18 • 34 min
While his one-of-a-kind humor made millions of TV viewers laugh in “Mork & Mindy” and his thoughtful approach to character garnered an Oscar for “Good Will Hunting,” Robin Williams also struggled with addiction, self-doubt and depression. New York Times…
Businesses Are Bracing For Political Surprise
May 17 • 48 min
The world just isn’t slowing down and today everything from global conflicts and terrorist actions, to hackers and even individual Twitter users can impact our lives and organizations like never before. Amy B. Zegart, senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover…
Can You Cure A Sex Offender?
May 17 • 48 min
High-profile accusations and convictions of sexual assault have made lots of headlines this year. There has been less reporting though, about what happens to the perpetrators of sex crimes – who often end up in mandatory therapy. We’ll talk this hour with…
What Woodrow Wilson Got Right — And Wrong
May 16 • 48 min
Woodrow Wilson faced many challenges as the 28th President of the United States – including the terrors of World War I in Europe and growing dissent and social pressures at home. Presidential biographer Patricia O’Toole joins us to discuss the Wilson…
Bad Teeth Will Hold You Back
May 15 • 48 min
Good teeth are important for everything from eating healthy to being able to smile confidently when you’re happy. The high cost of insurance though and lack of access to basic dental care in many rural, minority and poor communities is creating haves and…
Xi Jinping’s Vision Of A Global China
May 15 • 48 min
Big changes are underway in China and the country is reworking its image in the wider world as well. China expert Elizabeth C. Economy joins us to talk about what a global China might mean for the future. Her new book is “The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping…
When Black America Championed Mass Incarceration
May 14 • 48 min
America’s war on crime began in the 1970s and was strongly supported by black leaders in some of the country’s largest cities. Former public defender James Forman Jr. joins us to talk about how policies from that era lead to an overrepresentation of…
Don’t Believe Everything You See
May 14 • 48 min
French director Jean-Luc Godard famously said that “cinema is truth 24 frames-per-second.” Video editing is bringing that idea into question, though. Franklin Foer joins us to talk about how manipulation of digital video is chipping away what we consider…
What You Didn’t Know About Paul Simon
May 11 • 48 min
When running down the list of great American songwriters, it doesn’t take long to get to Paul Simon. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer collaborated with music critic Robert Hilburnon a definitive biography, and Hilburn joins us to talk about the book,“Paul…
Close Encounters With Pluto
May 10 • 48 min
In 2015, a spacecraft calledNew Horizonsflew by Pluto at 32,000 miles per hour, taking pictures all along the way.Alan Sternled the planning of the mission for NASA, and he joins us to talk about the years of work that went into sending the New Horizon…
A Family Wrestles Its Demons In Real Time
May 10 • 48 min
Stephen Karam’splay“The Humans”won the 2016 Tony Award for best play and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A production of the show visits theWinspear Opera HouseMay 8-20, and its star,Richard Thomas, joins us to talk about its story of aging parents…
A Chinese Boy, His Lost Mother, And His New White Parents
May 9 • 48 min
Lisa Ko was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award for fiction for her debut novel, “The Leavers” (Algonquin Books). She joins us to talk about her story of a young boy adopted by a pair of white professors after his Chinese immigrant mother…
The Fight For The Soul Of America
May 9 • 48 min
With income inequality, rising racism and deep division on gun control and other issues, it can feel like a dire time in America. Jon Meacham joins us to provide historical evidence that we’ve made it through tough times before – and about why those…
The Duplass Brothers On Sharing An Identity
May 8 • 48 min
Mark and Jay Duplass seemingly have the Midas touch in Hollywood. As actors, writers and producers, they’ve been involved in “Transparent,” “The Mindy Project,” “Togetherness,” “Wild Wild Country” and many, many other projects. The siblings join us to…
America: Stuck Between Two Borders
May 8 • 48 min
As a native of South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest has witnessed the struggles of undocumented immigrants crossing the border from Mexico. And when she moved near the Canadian border, she noticed similarities in how the U.S. has treated Native…
The Politics of Barbie’s Body
May 7 • 48 min
For nearly 60 years, young girls have brushed Barbie’s hair, taken her for a spin in her convertible and wondered what it would be like to live in that Dream House. Andrea Nevins joins us to talk about the profound effect this 11.5 inch-tall doll has had…
Is It Illegal To Be Mentally Ill?
May 7 • 48 min
For many mentally ill people, prison is a more likely landing spot than a hospital. Alisa Roth joins us to talk about how the criminal justice system is unprepared to treat these people – and about how the courts might rethink our prosecution of the…
Marcia Gay Harden Remembers What Her Mom No Longer Can
May 4 • 48 min
Marcia Gay Harden’s mother, Beverly, loved arranging flowers – a skill she learned while living in Asia. It’s through that lens that the Oscar-winning Texan tells Beverly’s story of love, loss and eventual struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. Her new book…
‘Why I Stopped Being A Skinhead’
May 3 • 48 min
As a teenager, Christian Picciolini joined a neo-Nazi group and charted a path for a life of violence and racism. He joins us to talk about how a moment of racial violence shook him out of his ways, which he writes about in “White American Youth: My…
Who Has Guns, Who Doesn’t, And Why
May 3 • 48 min
The National Rifle Association opens its annual convention today in Dallas. Juliana Menasce Horowitz of the Pew Research Center joins us to talk about America’s complex relationship with guns, the subject of a study she lead.
Riding The Rails: Life As A Drifter
May 2 • 48 min
Drifters maintain a constant state of motion, crisscrossing the country untethered to a physical address. TCU sociologist Jeff Ferrell joins us to talk about what he learned by spending time in these ephemeral communities, which he writes about in “Drift:…
Ronan Farrow On The Gutting Of American Diplomacy
May 2 • 48 min
Ronan Farrow won the Pulitzer Prize this year for his reporting on sexual misconduct in Hollywood. Before he was a journalist, though, he worked in the state department. As newly minted Secretary of State Mike Pompeo takes over the department, Farrow…
The Security Of Stuff
May 1 • 48 min
If you’ve ever named your car or owned a favorite T-shirt, you know that these everyday objects are more than just things. Francine Russo joins us to talk about the psychology behind why we get so attached to some objects – to the point where we assign…
My Party, My Identity
May 1 • 48 min
We’re at the point in our political discourse that many diehard Democrats and Republicans can’t even debate policy issues because to compromise at all is to concede a part of themselves. University of Maryland political scientist Lilliana Mason joins us…
Exonerated And Motivated
Apr 30 • 48 min
After serving a combined 60 years for crimes they didn’t commit, a trio of former inmates opened a detective agency in Dallas to investigate other wrongful convictions. Christopher Scott – one of the three – joins us to talk about how he rebuilt his life…
How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Became RBG
Apr 30 • 48 min
In her 25 years on the bench, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has reliably sided with the Supreme Court’s liberal wing. The 85-year-old’s life is the subject of the new documentary “RBG,” and its directors Betsy West and Julie Cohen join us to talk about Ginsburg’s…
How The Cowboys Cheerleaders Became America’s Team
Apr 27 • 48 min
In 1976, Suzanne Mitchell took over control of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders, transforming the troupe – and the gameday experience – forever. The documentary “Daughters of the Sexual Revolution: The Untold Story of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders”…
We Can’t See Them, But They’re Everywhere
Apr 26 • 48 min
For all of the natural world that we can see, there are millions upon millions of tiny organisms we can’t see. Eugenia Bone studies these microbes, and she joins us to talk about their outsized impact on our daily lives. Her new book is called “Microbia:…
What Your Dog’s Really Thinking And Feeling
Apr 26 • 48 min
Dogs may be man’s best friend – but they’ve got a strange way of showing it sometimes. Evolutionary biologist Marc Bekoff joins us to talk about the curious habits of our four-legged friends – and about how observing them closely can bring us closer to…
The Invisible Victims Of Sexual Assault
Apr 25 • 48 min
Every day, women head into fields, hotels and houses to pick crops, make beds and care for other people’s children. And along with low pay and long hours, they endure sexual harassment and assault. Investigative journalist Bernice Yeung joins us to talk…
Islamophobia Didn’t Begin With 9/11
Apr 25 • 48 min
Islamophobia has been ever present since Sept. 11, 2001. Its roots in America, though, go back centuries. University of Detroit Mercy associate law professor Khaled A. Beydoun joins us to talk about how anti-Muslim ideas have been ingrained in our legal…
Two Sisters, One Mental Illness
Apr 24 • 48 min
In the novel “Everything Here Is Beautiful” (Pamela Dorman Books), older sister Miranda dutifully watches over her unpredictable sibling, Lucia. Author Mira T. Lee joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how Lucia’s developing mental illness tests…