KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme
The Best School Is Out There
Nov 12 • 48 min
We all want our kids to receive a good education. But what constitutes a “good education?” Ken Robinson joins us to talk about how parents can guide their children to the right school and see that they make the most of their time in the classroom. His…
The Unseen Creatures We Live With
Nov 9 • 48 min
Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is…
Developing Health Care In The Developing World
Nov 8 • 48 min
Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is…
Throwing Shade — The Shakespearean Way
Nov 8 • 48 min
Citizens of Elizabethan England had very particular ways of thumbing their noses at others – from well-timed zingers to strategic Shakespeare quotes. Historian Ruth Goodman joins us for a rollicking trip back to a low-brow time, the subject of her book…
The Balancing Act Of Black Women
Nov 7 • 48 min
Black women often find themselves in a no-win situation. Call out racism and risk being seen as an agitator, or stay quiet and feel like part of the problem. University of Washington, Seattle associate professor of communications Ralina L. Joseph joins us…
The Midterm Elections: What The Results Mean
Nov 7 • 48 min
Did the Democrats retake the House? Was Ted Cruz able to hold off Beto O’Rourke? This week, we finally get the answers to those long-simmering questions and many others. We talk about the major storylines of the midterm elections with Rebecca Deen, chair…
The Founding Fathers Weigh In On Politics Today
Nov 6 • 48 min
Between politicians and federal judges, public figures talk a lot about what the Founding Fathers intended in the words they wrote to form the nation. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis joins us to examine the thought processes of…
The Literary Foundation Of Black Lives Matter
Nov 6 • 48 min
The Black Lives Matter movement was birthed by a hashtag just a few years ago. The call for equality and dignity, however, dates back much further. Johns Hopkins University philosopher Christopher J. Lebron joins us to walk through the history of American…
Why Learning To Read Is Still So Hard
Nov 5 • 48 min
Reading is one of the most studied aspects of human learning. And yet, students are rarely taught to read using scientifically proven methods. Emily Hanford, senior education correspondent for APM Reports, joins us to talk about why educators are failing…
An Hour Of Running With Peter Sagal
Nov 5 • 48 min
Every Saturday, public radio listeners tune into “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me” to catch up on the week that was and have a few laughs. Host Peter Sagal travels the country with the show, and the one thing he never forgets to pack is his running shoes. He…
When American Politics Was Really Divisive
Nov 2 • 48 min
If you think Congress is a messy place now, you should’ve been there in the run-up to the Civil War. Yale history professor Joanne Freeman joins guest host John McCaa to talk about a time when pistols were routinely drawn and all-out brawls frequently…
A Conversation With Ireland’s Ambassador To The U.S.
Nov 1 • 48 min
As Great Britain continues its Brexit negotiations with the E.U., one of the sticking points is the necessity for a physical border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. Daniel Mulhall, Ireland’s ambassador to the United States, joins us to talk about how…
What Single-Payer Health Care Might Really Look Like
Nov 1 • 48 min
Single-payer health care was one of Bernie Sanders’ campaign promises during his presidential run. And the baton has been picked up by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Beto O’Rourke and other prominent Democrats. Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, editor-in-chief of…
Gun Ownership: Why It’s Different For Black People
Oct 31 • 48 min
About a quarter of all African-Americans own a gun – and that number is on the rise. RJ Young is one of them, and he joins us to talk about his experience as an NRA-certified pistol instructor and about the differences between white and black gun culture.…
Have This Talk Before It’s Too Late
Oct 31 • 48 min
Death may be the one topic that nobody likes to talk about. Michael Hebb joins us to talk about why it’s important to engage with friends and loved ones about end-of-life wishes – and to offer practical tips for getting the conversation started. His new…
The Ups And Downs Of Facebook
Oct 30 • 48 min
For the last decade, Facebook has helped people separated by physical distance to reconnect and remain close. And it’s also been the place where those same people have found themselves alienated from one another because of both real and fake news. James…
Why Safe Spaces Make Students Less Resilient
Oct 30 • 48 min
College campuses were once safe spaces for the exchange of ideas. These days, though, both professors and students often feel as if they’re walking on eggshells. We talk with social psychologist Jonathan Haidt to explain why we’re setting students up to…
A Novel Of The Modern Native American
Oct 29 • 48 min
In Tommy Orange’s debut novel, “There, There” (Knopf), 12 Native Americans living in Oakland intersect at the Big Oakland Powwow. The book has been hailed by readers and critics alike, and we talk with Orange about creating native characters who…
The Greatest Battle The Marines Didn’t Win
Oct 29 • 48 min
The two-week fight at the Chosin Reservoir was one of the decisive battles of the Korean War – and one of the seminal moments in the history of the Marine Corps. We talk with historian Hampton Sides about the courageous Marines who braved sub-zero…
What Makes People Vote
Oct 25 • 49 min
Nearly every major national story-line of the last year has been funneled through the lens of the midterm elections. This hour, we look at voting in America past and present. We’ll start with a conversation with Pew Research Center senior researcher Alec…
How Presidents Make War
Oct 25 • 48 min
The most trying time for any inhabitant of the Oval Office is when the nation is at war. Historian Michael Beschloss joins us to talk about how presidents have navigated Congress, the press and the American people in guiding the country through armed…
When The Brain Rebels
Oct 25 • 48 min
People who suffer from epilepsy can find it difficult to move forward in life while under the constant threat of experiencing an episode. That was Kurt Eichenwald’s experience, and he joins us to talk about this often misunderstood condition – and how…
A Rape Survivor On Justice And Mercy
Oct 24 • 48 min
Our legal system has methods for punishing perpetrators of sexual assault. But prison time for the guilty doesn’t necessarily equal peace for the victim. Lacy Johnson joins us to talk about her own experience as a sexual assault survivor – and about how…
The Modern World Closes In On The Amazon
Oct 24 • 48 min
Logging operations are tempted by the Amazon and its vast forestland. Scott Wallace joins us to talk about how that thirst for lumber and other natural resources is threatening indigenous groups in Brazil and Peru. His story “Isolated Nomads Are Under…
The Evolution Of Empathy
Oct 23 • 48 min
The concept of empathy is only a little more than a century old. And yet how we define empathy has changed many times and in subtle ways. Historian Susan Lanzoni joins us to talk about how we’ve wrestled with the intersection of our own experience and the…
The Roots Of Black Lives Matter
Oct 22 • 48 min
The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2012 following the death of Trayvon Martin and gained steam two years later during the Ferguson uprising. University of Illinois at Chicago professor Barbara Ransby joins host us to talk about what Black Lives…
Mobs vs. Mexicans In Texas History
Oct 22 • 48 min
In the early decades of the 20th Century, Texas law enforcement and vigilantes killed Mexican citizens with little worry of legal consequences. Brown University assistant professor Monica Muñoz Martinez joins us to talk about how the families of these…
Computer Scientists Are Obsessed With Termites
Oct 19 • 48 min
Termites gobble up $40 billion worth of our stuff annually. Lisa Margonelli joins host joins to talk about these largely misunderstood insects, whose collective power may one day actually be harnessed for good. Her new book is called “Underbug: An…
The Forgotten Poverty Of Rural Whites
Oct 18 • 48 min
Sarah Smarsh grew up in a long line of poor wheat farmers in rural Kansas. She joins us to talk about how working-class poverty stretches across generations – and about our troubling tendency as a nation to judge people based on their wealth. Her new book…
Why America Should Take Care Of The World
Oct 18 • 48 min
As part of his “America First” policy, President Trump has pushed for a reduction in our involvement in global affairs. Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution joins us to make the case that this strategy leaves a leadership void that will likely make…
Can A Carbon Tax Curb Climate Change?
Oct 17 • 42 min
A report released last week by the United Nations predicts climate change could lead to worsening food shortages and a host of natural disasters as soon as 2040. Jeff Nesbit, executive director of Climate Nexus, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the…
The Risk Of Government Brain Drain
Oct 17 • 48 min
Much of our attention to government focuses on the Senate confirmation of judges and senior officials. Michael Lewis joins us to talk about the grunts who keep the federal government machine moving — and about how that machine is in danger of grinding to…
A Soldier, A Ghost, Shared Love And Betrayal
Oct 16 • 48 min
Eden Malcolm spends each day in his hospital bed, unable to communicate with his wife and young daughter. That is until the day he wakes up alone and rediscovers the spark of life. Eden is the creation of Elliot Ackerman, who joins us to tell the story of…
Us Vs. Them (And Everyone Else In The Middle)
Oct 16 • 48 min
It feels as if America is split down the middle between liberals and conservatives. The truth, though, is that we’re divided into even more significant, smaller factions. Researcher Daniel Yudkin joins us to take a more accurate and nuanced look at what…
The History of Impeachment
Oct 15 • 48 min
Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton each served as president of the United States — and each faced impeachment while in office. Jeffrey A. Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, joins us to take a balanced look at the…
Gaslighting: The Abuse Is Real
Oct 15 • 48 min
“Gaslighting” is the manipulative technique sociopaths, narcissists and others use to control people. Family counselor Stephanie Moulton Sarkis joins us to talk about how we can spot this pattern of lies, distractions and distortions of the truth, which…
Why We Can’t Get No Satisfaction
Oct 12 • 48 min
The self-help industry exists to make us think we could be living our best lives if only we tried a little harder and spent a little more. Heather Havrilesky joins us to make the case that we should embrace our imperfections and come to peace with the…
How Trump Is Winning At Foreign Policy
Oct 11 • 48 min
Since his election, President Trump has been at odds with the United Nations, NATO and many of our traditional allies. Ohio State political scientist Randall Schweller joins us to explain how the president’s foreign policy strategy has bolstered the…
You Might Not Be Alone In The Voting Booth
Oct 11 • 36 min
American democracy is dependent on the sanctity of the ballot box. So what happens if our election results come into question? Kim Zetter joins us to talk about how bad actors can actually tap into voting machines with relative ease – and about how the…
A Korean Kid, Her White Parents, And Why That Matters
Oct 10 • 48 min
Nicole Chung was raised by white parents in Oregon after her biological Korean parents placed her up for adoption. Chung joins us to tell the story of her search for her birth parents – and what that process taught her about her own identity – which she…
Democracy: Always Up For Debate
Oct 10 • 36 min
Democracy should be a pretty simple idea. But since its invention, societies have struggled with how to truly deliver power to the people. New School professor James Miller joins us to tell the stories of how cultures through the ages have tried – and…
Nanny State Parenting
Oct 9 • 35 min
Parental decisions are often made not out of a sense of what’s best for the child, but instead out of fear of making a choice others will see as wrong. Kim Brooks has experiences that parental blowback, and she joins us to talk about raising kids in a…
Cardiologists Get Heart Disease, Too
Oct 9 • 48 min
Today, open-heart surgery, pacemakers and even heart transplants feel fairly routine. Dr. Sandeep Jauhar joins us to take us back to a time when pioneering physicians risked their careers – and sometimes patients’ lives – to develop these lifesaving…
When The Border Patrol Crosses The Line
Oct 8 • 48 min
More than 200 million Americans live in the “border zone,” defined by the Justice Department as the area within 100 air miles of any land or coastal boundary. And in that border zone, Congress has granted U.S. Customs and Border Protection broad powers.…
Jose Antonio Vargas Could Be Deported At Any Moment
Oct 5 • 48 min
Pulitzer Prize-winner Jose Antonio Vargas has been called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America.” He joins us to talk about what it’s like to live a life of uncertainty, always feeling as if you’re hiding in plain sight. His new book is…
To Truly Know America, She Left
Oct 4 • 48 min
Sometimes a little distance is helpful in trying to understand something. That was Suzy Hansen’s experience years after leaving America to live in Istanbul. She joins us to talk about witnessing American power and influence from an outsider’s perspective,…
Why Are Fewer Black Americans Voting? They Can’t
Oct 4 • 42 min
In 2013, the Supreme Court struck down elements of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, angering those already worried about voter disenfranchisement. Carol Anderson, chair of African American Studies at Emory University, joins us to talk about how photo ID…
Will The Rio Run Dry?
Oct 3 • 48 min
Texas’ Rio Grande Valley is experiencing a population boom. And those additional people are putting a strain on the area’s natural resources – particularly water. Naveena Sadasivam joined *Think *at the studios of KUT in Austin to talk about how drought…
Yale Gave Him A Scholarship – Then He Gave Back
Oct 3 • 48 min
Casey Gerald grew up gay, black and poor in Dallas, the grandson of an evangelical pastor. And when he received a scholarship to play football at Yale, his world was opened to parts of American society he never knew existed. He joins us to talk about…
A Novel Way To Talk About Abortion
Oct 2 • 48 min
Jodi Picoult is the best-selling author of “Nineteen Minutes,” “Handle with Care, “House Rules” and many other novels. She joins us to talk about her latest effort,“A Spark of Light”(Random House), which tells the story of a police negotiator who rushes…
Got Facts? What You Didn’t Know About Milk
Oct 2 • 48 min
Humans have been drinking milk since the domestication of mammals more than 10,000 years ago. Mark Kurlansky joins us to talk about our complicated history with milk – from the gene mutation that lead to lactose intolerance to milk-borne illnesses that…
Shattering Science’s Glass Ceiling
Oct 1 • 48 min
In Marcia McNutt’s distinguished scientific career, she’s lead the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, the United States Geological Survey and taught at Stanford. She joins us to talk about encouraging young women to pursue STEM careers – and about…
Ethics In The White House
Sep 28 • 48 min
Every White House employs a lawyer charged with making sure the administration operates not only legally but ethically, too. Richard W. Painter served as chief ethics lawyer in the George W. Bush White House. As Think broadcasts from Austin as part of the…
A Conversation With John Kerry
Sep 28 • 48 min
John Kerry first entered the public arena as a critic of the Vietnam War, a path that lead to a senate seat, a presidential nomination and secretary of state. As Think broadcasts from the studios of KUT in Austin as part of the Texas Tribune Festival,…
Doris Kearns Goodwin On Presidential Leadership
Sep 26 • 48 min
As the author of “Team of Rivals,” “No Ordinary Time” and other books, Doris Kearns Goodwin is one of America’s foremost historians. The Pulitzer Prize-winner joins guest host John McCaa to talk about her latest effort, “Leadership in Turbulent Times”…
America’s Oldest Problem, Still Unsolved
Sep 26 • 48 min
In 1858, Abraham Lincoln famously told the Illinois Republican State Convention that, “a house divided against itself cannot stand,” arguing that the country couldn’t thrive while split over slavery. Ibram X. Kendi, director of the Antiracist Research and…
One Writer’s View Of An America In Crisis
Sep 25 • 48 min
The Civil War and the Great Depression each thrust the nation into a time of reinvention. And writer Ben Fountain feels we’re in the middle of another pivotal moment. He joins us to explain why he thinks the 2016 election and its aftermath have put the…
The Story Behind This Viral Photo
Sep 25 • 48 min
Aylan Kurdi made the front pages of newspapers across the world when images of the young Syrian refugee’s body washed up on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. Tima Kurdi had immigrated to Canada by the time she saw the picture of her nephew, and she…
Escape From Yemen
Sep 24 • 48 min
As a young Muslim living in Yemen, Mohammed al Samawi tried to build bridges between Muslims, Jews and Christians. And his efforts were met with death threats. He joins us to tell the story of how a coalition of online supporters worked together to…
When Logic Steers You Wrong
Sep 24 • 48 min
As a mathematician, Eugenia Cheng is trained to work through problems logically. And even she struggles with fears of things that are extremely unlikely to happen. She joins us to talk about how we can use scientific reasoning to navigate an era full of…
How Shaving Your Lady Bits Became A Thing
Sep 21 • 48 min
From unwanted hair to foul smells, there are many things we sometimes find icky about ourselves. Mara Altman joins us to talk about the untold history of why we hate our bodies, which she writes about in“Gross Anatomy: Dispatches from the Front and…
The True Story Of A Woman Buffalo Soldier
Sep 20 • 48 min
When the Civil War upended Cathy Williams’ world, the newly-freed woman made the incredible choice to disguise herself as a man and fight with the famed Buffalo Soldiers. Texas novelist Sarah Bird joins us to tell Williams’ story which is also the subject…
Sally Field As Herself
Sep 20 • 47 min
Sally Field is one of the most recognizable actors of her generation. She’s tackled countless roles from television’s Gidget to complex characters like Sybil and Mary Todd Lincoln on the big screen. The Academy Award winner joins us to reveal a character…
Forget The Planet – The Economics Of Fracking May Not Work
Sep 19 • 48 min
Boom and bust cycles are nothing new in the oil business – something Texas oil producers know well. And new extraction techniques like fracking have promised huge future gains for the industry. Investigative journalist Bethany McLean joins us to discuss…
Why So Many Parents Spy On Their Teens
Sep 19 • 48 min
Smartphones have made communication faster and easier than ever for moms and dads trying to keep up with busy teens. And services like location tracking offer even more information to worried parents. But is there a downside to knowing where a child is…
How Do You Steal A Dinosaur?
Sep 19 • 48 min
Everybody likes fossils. From shark’s teeth to small limestone shells, fossils are neat to hunt and collect. New Yorker staff writer Paige Williams joins us to talk about what happens when fossil hunters go big – Tyrannosaurus big – and run afoul of…
Reinventing Identity: South Asian Americans
Sep 18 • 48 min
South Asians comprise one of the fastest growing immigrant groups in America – building careers in fields like science, technology, business and more recently public service and pop culture. Journalist Yudhijit Bhattacharjee joins us to explore how this…
This Is Not Your Mother’s Girl Scouts
Sep 17 • 48 min
Growing up in Las Cruces, New Mexico, Sylvia Acevedo would play with a kaleidoscope in her back yard and dream big. She realized those dreams as one of the first Latina women to graduate with a master’s in engineering from Stanford University and to…
How We Catch Genes From Other Species
Sep 17 • 48 min
Through research spanning the last four decades, scientists have discovered that our DNA isn’t just inherited from ancestors. In fact about eight percent of the human genome comes from viruses. Science journalist David Quammen joins us to explore…
Why Humans Are The Most Successful Animal
Sep 14 • 48 min
Humans are unique – and not just in our own eyes. We’re the only species to both completely dominate the planet and simultaneously jeopardize our own ability to survive. Seth Fletcher, chief features editor for Scientific American Magazine, joins us to…
DeRay McKesson: A Voice From Ferguson
Sep 13 • 48 min
DeRay McKesson was on the ground in Ferguson, Mo., as protestors raged following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. And yet, his outlook is optimistic when it comes to healing America’s racial divides. He joins us to make the case that there’s a path to…
Citizen Students: Rights In Schools
Sep 13 • 48 min
A lot of kids first learn about the law in school. And if they study hard enough, they’ll learn that as students they’re often stripped of their Constitutional rights. University of Chicago law professor Justin Driver joins us to talk about how corporal…
The Wars We Couldn’t Win
Sep 12 • 48 min
New York Times reporter C.J. Chivers has covered war in Afghanistan and Iraq for more than a decade. The Pulitzer Prize winner joins us to tell the stories of these conflicts through the eyes of the U.S. military members fighting them, which he writes…
One Woman’s Fight Against Honor Killings
Sep 12 • 48 min
As a teenager growing up in Pakistan, Khalida Brohi’s life changed when she learned that her uncle had killed her female cousin in a so-called honor killing. Brohi joins us to talk about how that moment vaulted her into a life of activism to empower…
A Man Born At 30
Sep 11 • 48 min
What’s the relationship between masculinity and violence? The question was on the mind of Thomas Page McBee, a trans man who took up boxing as a way of exploring the connection. He joins us to talk about what he learned, which he writes about in“Amateur:…
Are Asian Americans The New White People?
Sep 11 • 48 min
A string of recent court cases have been based on the claim that Asian Americans are victims of reverse discrimination in hiring and college admissions. Journalist Iris Kuo joins us to talk about how these cases are raising questions about privilege and…
Who Are You? Labels Matter
Sep 10 • 48 min
Each week, Kwame Anthony Appiah helps readers of The New York Times with their moral quandaries as the paper’s Ethicist columnist. He joins us to further explore how we see ourselves in relation to one another, which he writes about in“The Lies That Bind:…
Go Ahead. Major in Philosophy
Sep 10 • 48 min
The number of students majoring in the humanities has declined dramatically in the last decade. Northeastern University assistant professor Benjamin Schmidt joins us to talk about the importance of studying literature, philosophy and related pursuits –…
The Woman Behind The Iran Nuclear Deal
Sep 7 • 48 min
Wendy Sherman served in the state department under President Clinton and President Obama, rising to Deputy Secretary of State. She joins us to talk about negotiating deals with North Korea and Iran – and about how we can apply the tools of diplomacy to…
How We Decide Stuff
Sep 6 • 48 min
Some of the biggest decisions in life are also the ones we’re least equipped to make. Steven Johnson joins us to talk about how the most effective decision-makers expertly consider the future outcomes of their choices, which he writes about in…
Not All Twitter Mobs Are Created Equal
Sep 6 • 48 min
A passionate group on Twitter can kill a promising movie project and get prominent people fired. Should social media, though, be the judge and jury on important issues? Amanda Hess writes about internet culture for The New York Times, and she joins us to…
How White Kids Learn About Race
Sep 5 • 48 min
American kids are listening in on a national conversation about race that’s more nuanced than in previous generations. Mississippi State sociologist Margaret Hagerman joins us to talk specifically about how white children learn about race – and about how…
How Walls Enable Peace (And When They Don’t)
Sep 5 • 48 min
A common thread that runs throughout the history of humanity is the desire to build barriers that separate us from those we think aren’t like us. Historian David Frye joins us to talk about the purposes served by Hadrian’s Wall, the Great Wall of China…
What Houston Learned From Harvey
Sep 4 • 48 min
A year ago this week, much of Houston was under water as residents surveyed the damage of Hurricane Harvey. Texas Monthly executive editor Mimi Swartz joins us to talk about lessons learned from the disaster, which she writes about this month for the…
It’s Not Your Homework: Advice For Parents
Sep 4 • 48 min
Raising children can be one of the most fulfilling experiences in a person’s life – and also one of the hardest. Parenting expert KJ Dell’Antonia joins us to talk about some of the most common stresses parents face – and how to ease them. Her new book is…
A New Face, A New Beginning
Sep 4 • 48 min
Last year, a 21-year-old patient at the Cleveland Clinic became the youngest ever recipient of a full-face transplant. National Geographic documented the 31-hour procedure, and Joanna Connors joins us to walk through the miraculous transformation. Her…
Helping Others (Unless It Hurts You)
Aug 30 • 48 min
The elite among us talk a big game when it comes to equality and justice – so long as it doesn’t threaten their place in the world order. Anand Giridharadas joins us to talk about the hypocrisy at play in our conversations about equality – and about how…
Rethinking Sex Education
Aug 30 • 48 min
Most parents dread having to finally have The Talk with their children, primarily because there’s no definitive way to talk about love and sex. Bonnie J. Rough joins us to offer some insights into how we might better communicate the facts of life to the…
The Case For More Radical Movements
Aug 29 • 48 min
Grassroots movements come in many forms – and some are more successful than others. Charlene A Carruthers joins us to talk about strategies social justice activists can adopt to accomplish their missions. Her book is called “Unapologetic: A Black, Queer,…
The Fifty Year Path To The Gig Economy
Aug 29 • 49 min
The standard thinking goes that the 2008 recession plus a more sophisticated internet led to the gig economy. Louis Hyman joins us to talk about how decisions made by business leaders as early as the 1950s actually laid the foundation for where we are…
Within The Margin Of Error: How Polling Really Works
Aug 28 • 48 min
With the midterm elections just a few months away, each new week will bring a new poll breaking down the campaigns. CBS News Director of Elections and Surveys Anthony Salvanto joins us to talk about how this data is collected – and about what happens when…
The Last Gasp For Organized Labor
Aug 28 • 49 min
Cases involving labor unions have been argued before the Supreme Court in recent years. Garret Keizer joins us to talk about how organized labor has mostly been weakened by these decisions – and about what workers can do to strengthen their position. His…
The Girls Left Behind By Mexican Migration
Aug 27 • 48 min
For decades, Mexican men have been recruited as temporary laborers in the U.S., working in fields, factories and in the service industry. That migration has left the young women they leave behind in a state of uncertainty. Lilia Soto of the University of…
The Dilemma Over Who Is – And Isn’t – Native American
Aug 27 • 49 min
The Lumbee tribe in North Carolina has struggled for decades to be recognized by the Federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. Without federal recognition, the Lumbee are denied sovereignty, their own land and benefits granted to other tribes. Journalist Lisa Rab…
Sorry, Thurgood Marshall: Girls Integrated Schools
Aug 23 • 48 min
During the earliest days of desegregation, black girls outnumbered boys as volunteers to attend all-white schools by a wide margin. Rachel Devlin joins guest host John McCaa to tell the stories of these Civil Rights pioneers. Her new book is called “A…
Why Everybody Lies About Education
Aug 22 • 47 min
Arne Duncan served in the Obama administration as the Secretary of Education. He joins guest host John McCaa to talk about strategies for improving our public schools, which he writes about in “How Schools Work: An Inside Account of Failure and Success…
The Spanish Civil War Still Isn’t Over
Aug 21 • 48 min
Across the U.S., cities are struggling with how we should publicly remember Civil War leaders. And a similar conversation is happening in Spain. Alex Palmer joins guest host John McCaa to talk about how the European nation is divided over how to…
Is The First Alzheimer’s Survivor Living Among Us?
Aug 20 • 48 min
For decades, scientists have believed that the nervous system and the immune system operated independent of one another – the former running the body and the second protecting it. University of Virginia neuroscientist Jonathan Kipnis joins guest host John…
A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance
Aug 17 • 49 min
In a special program, “A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance,” KERA’s Think and The California Report team up to examine the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, the crackdown on immigration, and the separation of families who attempted…
Does Democracy Still Work? Americans Weigh In
Aug 16 • 48 min
Democracy is government by the people. So how do the people feel about the state of our democracy? That’s the question researchers with the Bush Institute and Penn Biden Center explored in a recent poll. Lindsay Lloyd, deputy director of human rights at…