KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme


A Conversation With John Cleese
Dec 6 • 47 min
John Cleese is many things: co-creator of Monty Python, a pioneer of sketch comedy, master of silly walks. And now he is the recipient of VideoFest’s Ernie Kovacs Award, which celebrates another off-beat comedy icon.Cleese joins host Krys Boyd to talk…
Living In The Shadow Of George Wallace
Dec 5 • 47 min
In his 1963 inauguration speech, former Alabama Governor George Wallace promised a cheering crowd, “Segregation now. Segregation tomorrow. Segregation forever!” It would be many years later, when his daughter Peggy Wallace Kennedy had a child of her own,…
Even Silly Scientific Questions Have Answers
Dec 5 • 47 min
There are no ridiculous questions, just a million strangely satisfying answers. Randall Munroe is a science journalist, former NASA roboticist and writer of the popular web comic “xkcd,” and he set out to scientifically investigate oddball, possible…
Junk: The Billion Dollar Industry
Dec 3 • 47 min
When we donate clothing and other goods to a charity, do we really know where they go? Turns out, our decluttering fuels a global, billion-dollar, second-hand trade system. Adam Minter joins host Krys Boyd to talk about people who find treasure in our…
The Trial And (Mostly) Error Of Medieval Science
Dec 3 • 48 min
People who lived during the Middle Ages ran into many of the same health problems we see today. The biggest difference, of course, is they had much different – and not very scientific – ways of dealing with these maladies, the way we view the science of…
Susan Rice On Benghazi, Iran And Handing The Keys To The Trump Administration
Dec 2 • 48 min
Pragmatic, relentless, pursued, and emboldened: those are apt to describe Susan E. Rice, former national security adviser and UN ambassador under President Barack Obama. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about everything from her family’s history of…
Can Stem Cells Really Cure Everything?
Dec 2 • 46 min
Stem-cell therapies promise to relieve aching joints, treat autism, even cure cancer. But without real, scientific research behind the claims, it’s hard for consumers to know if they’re buying a miracle cure or exposing themselves to snake oil. Health and…
Why There’s A Massive Shortage Of Psychiatric Hospital Beds
Nov 26 • 48 min
In 1973, a Stanford psychologist and seven others conducted an undercover sting to test the legitimacy of mental health diagnoses. The resulting scientific paper changed the course of modern psychiatry … but was any of it true? Author Susannah Cahalan…
LGBTQ And Christian? How One Church Decided
Nov 26 • 47 min
Same-sex marriage was legalized by the Supreme Court in 2015, but that decision didn’t settle ongoing questions of how churches incorporate LGBTQ members. Mark Wingfield, associate pastor of Dallas’ Wilshire Baptist Church, joins host Krys Boyd to talk…
The Brilliant Women Walt Disney Drew From
Nov 25 • 47 min
With Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Snow White, Disney has created some of cinema’s most recognizable female characters. Which is ironic, considering the studio was once quite a boys club. Nathalia Holt joins host Krys Boyd to talk about Disney’s Golden…
What Indigenous Cultures Can Teach Climate Scientists
Nov 25 • 47 min
As climate scientists try to protect a warming world, some are looking to indigenous peoples for lessons in caring for the land. Alejandro Frid, an ecologist for First Nations of British Columbia’s Central Coast and adjunct assistant professor in the…
What It Was Like To Be Mr. Rogers’ Friend
Nov 22 • 47 min
Journalist Tom Junod had lost confidence in himself. He was known as cynical, hardened journalist. So it was an inside-joke that he’d be assigned to interview the nicest man in America: Fred Rogers. Junod joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what turned…
How Economists Can Save The World
Nov 21 • 47 min
Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer shared the 2019 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for their “experimental approach to alleviating global poverty.” Duflo and Banerjee are both economics professor at MIT, and they join host Krys…
All She Wanted Was To Be A Single Black Mother
Nov 19 • 49 min
Nefertiti Austin’s request seemed simple enough – all she wanted was to adopt the boy she was already caring for as a foster parent. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what that painstaking process taught her about how America thinks of single, black…
The Idealism Of Samantha Power
Nov 18 • 48 min
Samantha Power began her career as a journalist tracking human rights abuses, which led to a Pulitzer Prize. But transitioning from muckraker to policymaker meant learning new ways of tackling international issues. The former U.S. Ambassador to the United…
The Bloody History Of Thanksgiving
Nov 15 • 48 min
In 1621, the chief of the Wampanoag tribe and the governor of Plymouth agreed to a truce. And that fall, their respective people actually did gather to celebrate a successful harvest. George Washington University professor David J. Silverman joins host…
Lindy West Takes On The Patriarchy
Nov 14 • 48 min
Lindy West made a name for herself with her critically acclaimed memoir “Shrill,” which was developed into a series for Hulu. The New York Times columnist joins host Krys Boyd about to talk about her follow-up, “The Witches Are Coming,” which looks the…
New Strategies For Preventing Gun Violence
Nov 14 • 47 min
Seventy-one percent of Americans say mass shootings are a “significant source of stress,” according to a new poll from the American Psychological Association. Robyn Thomas, Executive Director of Giffords Law Center,and Peter Ambler, Executive Director of…
The Pioneers Who Pushed America West
Nov 13 • 49 min
The call of the West pulled adventurous Americans from the East Coast to cross the Mississippi in search of fortune. H.W. Brands, Jack S. Blanton, Sr. chair in history at the University of Texas at Austin, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the…
How Reading And Writing Saved A Lost Girl
Nov 12 • 46 min
Jaquira Diaz’s formative years were complicated. Growing up in Puerto Rican housing projects, in a family affected by mental illness, all while navigating her own struggles with sexual assault and depression – it’s a wonder she survived. But survive, she…
When A White Supremacist Attended Shabbat
Nov 12 • 47 min
Derek Black is the son of a KKK grand wizard and godson of David Duke. And when he met Matthew Stevenson, an Orthodox Jew, in college, the two seemed like an unlikely pair. They join host Krys Boyd to talk about the time Matthew invited Derek to attend a…
Why Debutantes Are Still A Thing
Nov 11 • 48 min
The tradition of young women “debuting” began 600 years ago in the court of Elizabeth 1. And since that time, the practice has crossed back and forth across the Atlantic. Kristen Richardson joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what it is to become a…
What Happened To All Those Migrant Children?
Nov 11 • 48 min
More than 1,500 migrant children have been taken from their parents at the border by the Trump administration, according to the ACLU. Frontline investigative producer and correspondent Daffodil Altan joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what happens to…
The Nerdy Brilliance Of Comedian Hari Kondabolu
Nov 8 • 48 min
Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor openly challenged their audiences. Comic Hari Kondabolu, however, takes a more circuitous path via self-deprecation and intellect to attack racism and human rights violations. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his comedy…
Do Red Flag Laws Actually Work?
Nov 7 • 48 min
Red flag laws, or “extreme risk protection orders,” make it easy for the government to confiscate guns from citizens if they pose a grave risk to society. It sounds logical, but do they actually work? Jacob Sullum of Reason magazine joins host Krys Boyd…
Queen Latifah, Lil’ Kim And The History Of Women In Rap
Nov 7 • 48 min
Hip-hop is a genre primarily ruled by men. But just try turning on the radio for a few minutes without hearing a song by Cardi B or Nicki Minaj. Music journalist Kathy Iandoli joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the contributions of Queen Latifah,…
‘Undone’: The Story Behind Amazon’s Coolest Series
Nov 6 • 47 min
There are great gifts and there are great burdens – and in the new Amazon series “Undone,”the lead character must decide which one she has. Kate Purdy, co-creator, producer and writer of “Undone,” joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her drama, which uses…
What Brexit’s Really About
Nov 6 • 48 min
It’s been three years since British voters chose to leave the European Union, though negotiations on how that will work drag on. But you have to look much further back than the 2016 vote to understand how Brexit came to be. Fintan O’Toole, a writer for…
Frauds And Fakers And Counterfeit Makers
Nov 5 • 46 min
When we shell out hard-earned cash for something nice, it’s upsetting to discover it’s a fake. Sometimes, though, collectors who wind up with knockoffs come to prize them. Lydia Pyne, visiting researcher at the Institute for Historical Studies at the…
The Indian Children Stolen By The Federal Government
Nov 5 • 47 min
Throughout the American West, you’ll often find main city thoroughfares named “Indian School Road.” But city maps don’t tell the story behind the name: trauma inflicted by the U.S. government on Native American children. Nick Estes, assistant professor in…
Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan on Recent Rate Cuts
Nov 4 • 47 min
The Federal Reserve recently announced it is cutting interest rates by a quarter point*– *the third cut this year. Robert S. Kaplan, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how these decisions are made,…
America’s Hottest Companies – And Their Shaky Balance Sheets
Nov 4 • 47 min
Silicon Valley has tried to rethink the way we drive, where we work and how we accomplish life’s everyday tasks. Derek Thompson, contributing writer at The Atlantic, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how long these companies can survive when profits seem…
The Adolescence of Animals
Nov 1 • 48 min
Teenagers are known for being moody, hormonal and awkward – characteristics that extends beyond humans. Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, visiting professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard and president of the International…
YouTube and the Next Generation of Celebrity
Oct 31 • 47 min
It wasn’t that long ago that being on television was the surest route to celebrity. Today, YouTube is king, and personalities are raking in fame, riches and followers. Richard Lawson of Vanity Fair joins host Krys Boyd to profile these internet celebs,…
Death, Ingénues, And True Crime: A Halloween Special
Oct 31 • 48 min
Obsession, murder, dying, and a touch of humor: just some of the dark subjects we’ll touch on in this Halloween special. Host Krys Boyd talks with a mortician, a journalist studying true crime, and an examination of women in horror films from a feminist’s…
Why The Lovelist Treasures Are Cultivated By Pain
Oct 29 • 48 min
Exotic perfumes, stoles of angora fur, a strand of delicate pearls, even simple mirrors: these are luxuries people have coveted for centuries … but they don’t come without a price. Writer and editor Katy Kelleher joins host Krys Boyd to pull back the…
Modern Man Vs Cave Man: Why We Might Be Losing That Battle
Oct 29 • 47 min
Progress by definition is good, but it’s not without its downsides. Even major advancements – commercial travel, the internet, nuclear energy, etc. – can cause major problems in the hands of bad actors. Christopher Ryan joins host Krys Boyd to talk about…
Thomas Jefferson’s Utopian Vision and the Violent Reality
Oct 28 • 48 min
Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia with equality and enlightenment in mind. In reality, the citizens of the state didn’t share the same values. Alan Taylor, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how a school…
When the Buzz of Progress Becomes Noise Pollution
Oct 28 • 48 min
In a busy city, you expect noise. The sounds of planes, cars, sirens are all an expected part of daily life. But noise is now seeping into even the rural landscape, and tech is to blame. Bianca Bosker, contributing writer at The Atlantic, joins host Krys…
Opioids In Rural America
Oct 25 • 47 min
The opioid crisis touches every corner of America. Kentucky, though, suffers particularly hard as the rate of opioid-related deaths in the state is double the national average. As Think broadcasts from Lexington, Kentucky, host Krys Boyd talks with…
Refusing to Be Defined by Disability
Oct 24 • 48 min
Keah Brown is a smart, funny woman with an affinity for pop culture. She’s got a lot to offer – but throughout her life, so many people only see her as someone with cerebral palsy. The journalist and creator of #DisabledandCute joins guest host Courtney…
A Conversation With John Grisham
Oct 24 • 68 min
John Grisham’s characters are familiar by now: brilliant lawyers in over their heads with mysterious, dark forces hot on their heels. And we can’t get enough. Grisham joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about his prolific pace of writing a book a…
How Religion, Violence And Greed Shaped Latin America
Oct 23 • 47 min
Latin America is a diverse place, but there are common themes that have shaped the region over the last millennium. Marie Arana, literary director of the National Book Festival, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how exploitation, violence and religion…
When Lincoln Died, The Drama Began
Oct 23 • 47 min
In the days following President Lincoln’s assassination, a secret and furious battle erupted to see which of his lieutenants would lead the country. Steve Walters and Erik Archilla, co-creators of a dramatic podcast about those chaotic days, join host…
John Hodgman’s 15 Minutes Of Fame
Oct 22 • 48 min
You might know John Hodgman from his days as a correspondent on “The Daily Show,” or from years of Apple ads, or from his last book, “Vacationland.” The point is, Hodgman really hopes you know him. The writer, comedian and actor joins host Krys Boyd to…
How President Bush Made The Call On The 2007 Iraq Surge
Oct 22 • 48 min
In May 2003, President George W. Bush announced, “mission accomplished,” marking the end of the military phase of the Iraq War. Four years later, he deployed 30,000 more troops to quell civil war. Jeffrey A. Engel, director of the Center for Presidential…
We All Want To Be Equal (And Above Everyone Else)
Oct 21 • 48 min
The assumption that “people vote with their pocketbooks” dismisses identity politics; after all, nationalism and populism aren’t rooted solely in economic theory. Francis Fukuyama, senior fellow at Stanford University and Mosbacher Director at The Center…
Why We Should Bring Back The Draft
Oct 21 • 48 min
The war in Afghanistan is now the longest in American history – many new enlistees weren’t even born when it began 18 years ago. Elliot Ackerman served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan as a Marine, and he joins host Krys Boyd to discuss why, he…
Why You Should Fear Volcanoes More Than Ebola
Oct 18 • 48 min
What’s the use of doom and gloom if an asteroid takes us out anyway? But, really, it might just be gene-editing that get us in the end, if we’re being honest. Journalist Bryan Walsh joins Krys Boyd to talk about the many probabilities of world-ending…
Life Lessons From A Black Academic
Oct 17 • 48 min
The modern feminist movement, with Gloria Steinem as its face, could be said was focused primarily on white women’s rights. Black feminist author and assistant professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University Tressie McMillan Cottom, joins host…
What Does Jeff Bezos Want?
Oct 16 • 48 min
“Alexa, remind me to get milk at the store.” “Alexa, put soccer practice on the calendar.” “Alexa, colonize space.” Staff writer for The Atlantic Franklin Foer joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his research into Amazon and what happens when Big Tech…
If You Go Off The Pill, Will You Still Love Your Husband?
Oct 16 • 48 min
There’s always a wink and nod when a woman says, “it’s that time of the month.” But why do personalities and craving shift so drastically—especially when on the pill? Sarah E. Hill, research psychologist and professor, Department of Psychology, TCU joins…
You: Meet ‘Digital’ You
Oct 15 • 48 min
What we see isn’t necessarily what we experience, and what we feel isn’t necessarily based on what we see. But why? Turns out science isn’t clear on that question–but not for lack of trying. Neuroscientist and psychologist Michael S. A. Graziano joins…
They Made One Of The Greatest Archaeological Discoveries Of All Time
Oct 15 • 48 min
A pile of bones found deep inside a South African cave revealed a spectacular discovery: a new species of human ancestry. Paleoanthropologist Professor Lee Berger and Director of the Center for the Exploration of the Human Journey at the Perot Museum…
Netflix And Chill? You Are Burning Coal
Oct 14 • 48 min
When we separate out our trash and fill the recycling bin, we feel like better stewards of the earth. But maybe it’s time to look outside the bin to really address climate change. Journalist Tatiana Schlossberg joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how…
Travel Writer, Paul Theroux On Life And Death In Mexico
Oct 14 • 48 min
Recording the sights and cuisine of a particular place is the hallmark of travel journalism, but documenting the pain of migration, hopes of the poor, and the color of a landscape creates an important, historical document for the genre. Paul Theroux joins…
Reuniting Mind and Body In Treating Trauma
Oct 10 • 35 min
Trauma is more than just PTSD. First responders often suffer from it, along with medical students, even stressed out professionals. James S. Gordon, M.D., founder and executive director of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine in Washington, D.C., joins host…
Here Is What We Can Do About Anti-Semitism
Oct 10 • 48 min
When the Tree of Life synagogue was attacked while the assailant screamed, “All Jews must die,” it was a wake-up call: hatred is not just for the history books, but is alive and thriving today. Bari Weiss, staff writer and editor for the opinion section…
Are Male and Female Brains Really So Different?
Oct 9 • 37 min
We hear men are inherently more violent or that a woman’s brain makes her a deeper thinker…but how much of this is just pop culture science? Kevin Mitchell, Associate Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience at Trinity College Dublin, joins host Krys Boyd…
The Science Behind Your Bad Habits
Oct 9 • 48 min
It’s New Year’s Eve and you pledge that this year you’ll go to the gym. Six weeks later you’re binging on TV instead. But your neighbor? She hits the gym every day. How does she do it and why can’t you? Wendy Wood, provost professor of psychology and…
Talking Back To A Culture That Doesn’t Value Gay Black Men
Oct 8 • 37 min
In those years between child, teenager, and man, there is a hard-fought battle for identity. But growing up black and queer in a Texas town adds more layers to those lessons of pain, vulnerability, and love. Poet Saeed Jones joins host Krys Boyd to…
She Fights for Muslim’s First Amendments And She Would Fight For Yours Too
Oct 8 • 48 min
Freedom of religion – or freedom from a religion – is guaranteed with the First Amendment. But recently the question has been asked, which religions should have greater access to that freedom? Asma Uddin, lawyer and scholar specializing in U.S. and…
Often Wrong But Never In Doubt: Political Polarization in America
Oct 7 • 35 min
“I told you so” might be one of the most satisfying phrases in the English language: it lets us know how wise we are and frees us from any blame. Michael Patrick Lynch, Director of the Humanities Institute and professor of philosophy at University of…
Do Museums Sell Respectability?
Oct 7 • 48 min
The art world oozes glamour and, more importantly, money. Rhonda Lieberman joins host Krys Boyd to discuss her views that art philanthropy can invite unsavory business ties, which museums must court in order to fund their institutions. Her article,…
When To Blow The Whistle
Oct 4 • 47 min
There isn’t a news outlet in America that hasn’t written or talked about whistleblowers in the last week. Tom Mueller joins Krys Boyd to talk about the calculations that whistleblowers go through when they decide to raise an issue – and about what’s ahead…
Women In The Ashes Of ISIS
Oct 3 • 34 min
Al-Qaeda was conceived by men as a movement for men. But with the rise of ISIS, women were called to build a new society together with men, and many answered that call. Journalist Azadeh Moaveni joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the realities young…
A Case For Clemency
Oct 2 • 48 min
When a judge imposes a sentence, is justice really served? What if forgiveness could be the more moral – and effective – choice? Martha Minow, a professor at Harvard Law School, joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the intersection of crime and punishment and…
The Evolution of City Mouse And Country Mouse
Oct 2 • 33 min
Urban landscapes are characterized as hot and gritty, with more concrete than green space. Still, pigeons, coyotes and fish often thrive despite the inhospitable conditions. Brendan Koerner joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the burgeoning study of urban…
How We Evolved The Need To Believe
Oct 1 • 48 min
When early humans formalized a relationship between man and god, how did it eventually become the faiths we know today? Agustín Fuentes, Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the…
New Frontiers In Medicine — And Medical Ethics
Oct 1 • 48 min
Imagine these scenarios: a loved one is dying, but a new machine can prolong their life; a life-saving drug just hit the market, but it will bankrupt the family. Dr. Jonathan Moreno, a professor of ethics at the University of Pennsylvania, joins host Krys…
How Saudi Arabia Won Donald Trump Over
Sep 30 • 48 min
Saudi Arabia’s crown prince Mohammed bin Salman promised reform, even granting women the right to drive. But when Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered, the violence and revenge at his behest became clear. Journalist Martin Smith joins…
A Thousand Years Of Pirate History
Sep 30 • 48 min
Pirates have captured the popular imagination since the Elizabethan Era: ship hulls filled with chests of gold and stolen rubies. Today, though, pirates are more a product of failed states with bounties of hostages for ransom. Maritime terrorism expert…
The Education Of A University Chancellor
Sep 27 • 49 min
The large state university is under the microscope these days: who gets in and why, the rise of the for-profit degree, exorbitant student debt, and, of course, football (or at least the money that surrounds it). As Think broadcasts from the Texas Tribune…
Meet The Man Trying To Primary Trump
Sep 26 • 48 min
President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign began almost as soon as he took office, but there are a few traditional, fiscally conservative Republicans who want to challenge him. As Think broadcasts from the studios of KUT in Austin, William Weld –…
If You Need A Court-Appointed Lawyer, Watch Out
Sep 26 • 47 min
Courtroom judgments are supposed to be made without consideration of race, sex, class or ethnicity – if you can get a good lawyer. As Think broadcasts from the studios of KUT in Austin, journalist Neena Satija joins host Krys Boyd to discuss how Texas’…
How Abusers Stalk Through The Courts
Sep 25 • 46 min
There’s an expectation that a protective order filed in a courtroom will bring some relief to a victim of domestic violence — that is unless the abusive ex uses a courtroom to terrorize. Journalist Jessica Klein joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk…
The Inequality Of Urban Design
Sep 24 • 48 min
Pedestrian deaths are on the rise. Population spikes, growth in truck and SUV sales, people distracted by their phones — these are all reasons cited for the jump. But what about racism? Tamika L. Butler, director of planning for California and the…
Anything You Ever Wanted To Know About Death
Sep 24 • 47 min
“Where do we go when we die?” That might be a subject best left to the philosophers. But what about other burning questions like, “What happens to astronauts if they die in space?” or “Do fingernails grow after I’m dead?” Mortician Caitlin Doughty joins…
What Does The SAT Really Measure?
Sep 23 • 47 min
When wealthy parents were caught bribing their children’s way into exclusive schools, it highlighted a broken admissions system. Journalist Paul Tough joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the hurdles low-income students face to attend college — many that…
Margaret Atwood Tells The Rest Of The Story
Sep 23 • 48 min
In 1985, the world met Offred, the protagonist of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a dystopian world in which fertile women are forced surrogates to the religious ruling regime in Gilead. Now the characters return in a much-anticipated sequel. Novelist Margaret…
When Fans Write The Story
Sep 20 • 45 min
“Trekkies” are known the world over (though they’d snap back that it’s “Trekkers”). For lovers of “Star Trek,” “Harry Potter” and the like, fandom isn’t just about admiration – try bemoaning a song by Taylor Swift or Nicki Minaj if you want swift justice…
The Struggles Of Low-Income College Students Go Beyond Tuition
Sep 19 • 48 min
We celebrate when a disadvantaged student makes it into a top college. But what happens when the welcome mat is rolled up and classes begin? Anthony Jack was once one of those students. The Harvard education professor joins host Krys Boyd to talk about…
Are We Going To War With Iran?
Sep 19 • 40 min
Questions remain about the drone strikes that took out half of Saudi Arabia’s Aramco oil facility. The Houthis in Syria have claimed responsibility, but the Trump administration is pointing the finger at Iran. Jim Krane, Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for…
Why Trump Is THE T.V. President
Sep 18 • 48 min
How did a man known for the TV catch phrase “You’re fired” get hired to the highest office in the land? James Poniewozik, chief television critic for The New York Times, joins host Krys Boyd to argue that Donald Trump represents the melding of politics…
Do Colleges Really Need Safe Spaces?
Sep 18 • 48 min
College campuses have traditionally welcomed the free exchange of ideas – even controversial ones. But is that tradition still alive and well? Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his approach to civil…
After Hurricanes, We All Pay To Bail Out The Beach
Sep 17 • 48 min
You’ve seen the house hunting TV shows featuring people who want an upscale vacation home right on the water. These buyers can obviously afford beachfront property, so why is it that when a massive hurricane hits, taxpayers are on the hook for a rebuild?…
W. Kamau Bell’s America
Sep 17 • 48 min
W. Kamau Bell is a comedian – but he doesn’t tell one-liners. The host and executive producer of the Emmy-winning CNN series “United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell” inserts himself in awkward situations – meeting with a chapter of the KKK, for…
The $300 Band-Aid: Surprises In Medical Bills
Sep 16 • 48 min
When a medical emergency lands someone in the hospital, insult is often added to injury by bills that can put families tens of thousands of dollars in debt. Dr. Marty Makary, a surgeon and professor of health policy at Johns Hopkins University, joins host…
A Case For Staying In Afghanistan
Sep 16 • 48 min
Last week, President Trump canceled peace talks with the Taliban but remained committed to pulling U.S. troops out of America’s longest-running war. Farhat Popal and Chris Walsh of theGeorge W. Bush Institutejoin host Krys Boyd to make the case that the…
Puerto Rico is Not Free
Sep 13 • 48 min
When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, the island was devastated. But the destruction of the its economy via U.S. policies began long before 2017. Ed Morales, lecturer Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, joins host Krys Boyd…
The Deadly Cost of Amazon’s One-Day Delivery
Sep 12 • 47 min
These days, when we order from Amazon, we expect a certain standard: it will be cheap and it will arrive fast—sometimes same day. Buzzfeed News reporter Caroline O’Donahue joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the safety, labor, and human costs that are very…
When Bombs Tried to Kill Them, Books Kept Their Souls Alive
Sep 12 • 47 min
The Syrian Civil War reduced that country to rubble. Ancient cities once full of life, are now empty shells; citizens live in the shadows of obliterated schools, hospitals, and homes. Journalist Mike Thompson joins host Krys Boyd to talk about one bright…
Who’s Looking After Home Health Care Workers?
Sep 11 • 48 min
We willingly and gratefully invite healthcare workers into our home to care for our loved ones in their most vulnerable moments, but who is looking out for them? Reporter Alexia Fernández Campbell joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the harsh realities of…
The Invention of Modern Anthropology
Sep 11 • 48 min
There was a time when school children were taught that civilizations were “primitive,” the people, “savages.” That is, until the father of modern anthropology changed the narrative. Charles King, Georgetown University Professor of International Affairs…
Why True Crime’s Biggest Fans are Women
Sep 10 • 47 min
Whether we want to admit it or not, audiences crave violence. Take the dominance of “true crime,” the New York Times called the genre a “gold rush.” Journalist Rachel Monroe joins host Krys Boyd to talk about murder, media, and the people obsessed with…
The Extraordinary Eye of Gordon Parks
Sep 9 • 47 min
Gordon Parks, the first African American staff photographer for Life Magazine saw his camera, he said, as “a weapon against poverty.” John Rohrbach, Senior Curator of Photographs at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, joins host Krys Boyd to talk…
Who Am I Without My Mother Tongue?
Sep 9 • 48 min
It wasn’t long ago when bilingualism was frowned upon—immigrant parents were asked to stick to one language at home so families could all be versed in the lingua franca. But with that unwritten policy, came a loss of connection to family and traditions.…
Who’s A Good Dog?
Sep 6 • 47 min
According to the American Pet Products Association, we spend almost $70 billion on our dogs each year. It’s clear we love our dogs–but do we truly understand our relationship to our furry friends? Alexandra Horowitz, who runs Barnard College’s Dog…
There’s A Lot You Don’t Know About Country Music
Sep 6 • 48 min
Country music is a genre built by artists who were outsiders, singing to those who felt left out. Host Krys Boyd sits down with writer/producer Dayton Duncan and producer Julie Dunfey to talk about their work on “Country Music,” the new eight-part series…
The Case For Single Payer Healthcare
Sep 6 • 47 min
In 2018, Americans spent more on healthcare than the GDPs of Brazil, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Spain and Canada. Healthcare activist Timothy Faust joins host Krys Boyd to discuss why, he says, it’s more dangerous to get sick in the U.S. than anywhere in…