KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme


Roadmap To Iraq: The Bush Administration’s Path To War
Aug 4 • 47 min
It’s been 17 years since U.S. forces invaded Iraq. Robert Draper of The New York Times joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how a combination of groupthink, faulty intelligence and a flawed decision-making process led to a war that spawned many unintended…
Gun Culture A Year After El Paso
Aug 3 • 48 min
One year ago today, a man allegedly drove 10 hours, stopped at a Walmart in El Paso, and opened fire, killing 23. On the anniversary of the deadliest anti-Latino attack in American history, we’ll revisit the debate about guns in America. Jennifer Carlson,…
The Making And Breaking Of The Middle Class
Aug 3 • 47 min
The promise of the middle class began in the 1920s with a promise of “a chicken in every pot.” By mid-century, the dream became much more expansive—even as it turned away a significant portion of Americans. David Stebenne, teaches political, legal and…
Life In The Shadow Of The Border Wall
Aug 3 • 50 min
For most Americans, President Trump’s border wall is an abstract idea. But for people living along the border, its physical presence actually affects their lives. D.W. Gibson spent two years observing a section of the wall’s development – from prototype…
A Doctor Revisits The Worst Of The AIDS Years
Jul 29 • 47 min
Dr. Ross Slotten experienced the AIDS crisis both as a newly-minted physician caring for patients and as a gay man watching many friends die from the virus. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his personal experience caring for people amid the epidemic.…
The Covid Numbers You Should Care About
Jul 29 • 46 min
Each day we’re inundated with new data about the spread of COVID-19. But which numbers tell the real story? Caroline Chen covers healthcare for ProPublica and is currently reporting on the coronavirus pandemic. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how…
Alex Jones And The Explosion Of Conspiracy Theory
Jul 28 • 47 min
It seems unreal: a conspiracy that connected online retailer Wayfair to organized child sex trafficking. But so many believed it that the National Human Trafficking Hotline was overwhelmed with calls. Where do these ideas originate? And how do they affect…
There She Is: The History Of Miss America
Jul 28 • 48 min
You might remember the glitzy days of nationally televised beauty pageants: parades of beautifully coiffed young women representing every corner of America. Was this a celebration of femininity or a slap in the face for feminism? City University of New…
The Sorry State Of Apologies
Jul 27 • 47 min
When we hurt someone’s feelings, it’s hard to cop to our mistakes. It’s even harder to repair the damage by asking for forgiveness. Clinical psychologist Molly Howes joins host Krys Boyd to examine how we make amends and how acknowledging harm heals the…
The Best Way To Listen To This Show Is While Walking
Jul 24 • 49 min
We all need some self-care these days, so if someone growls at you to “take a hike,” definitely take them up on it. After all, it’s one of the healthiest things you can do. Trinity College Dublin neuroscientist Shane O’Mara joins host Krys Boyd to talk…
Meet The Real Tree Huggers
Jul 23 • 47 min
Forests move. When a tree dies or is felled, a new one sprouts and shifts the landscape, leading to a natural migration. Enter: climate change. Science reporter Zach St. George joins host Krys Boyd to talk about ecological efforts to protect woodlands and…
Why Dollar Stores Get Robbed All The Time
Jul 23 • 47 min
From the road, the dollar store inside the strip mall is innocuous, maybe a place for a bargain or a last-minute purchase. And they’re popular – increasing in number 50-percent in the last 10 years. But they’re also home to a steady stream of violence.…
Why Children Need Love To Love Others
Jul 22 • 48 min
You might remember the horrifying images of Romanian orphanages released in the 1990s: children rocking themselves for comfort in cribs, babies left alone and uncared for, emotional and physical development stunted. Was the damage done beyond repair?…
Can The Black Experience Ever Be Detached From Slavery?
Jul 22 • 47 min
James Baldwin said, “hope is invented every day.” But what if that hope conjured by one race is ignored and trampled on by others? Frank B. Wilderson III, professor and chair of African American studies at the University of California, Irvine, joins host…
Grow A Garden, Tend Your Mind
Jul 21 • 47 min
Quarantines are stifling; time seems to have stopped and we feel trapped inside. But there is physical freedom waiting for us right below our feet. Psychiatrist Sue Stuart-Smith talks to host Krys Boyd about therapeutic horticulture, which she writes…
What’s Standing In The Way Of A COVID Vaccine
Jul 21 • 47 min
From the beginning of pandemic lockdown, the message has been: When we get a vaccine, life will go back to normal. But when that will be – if ever – remains an open question. Dr. Seema Yasmin is an epidemiologist, medical doctor, journalist, and a former…
Why Leprosy Was Always Misunderstood
Jul 20 • 47 min
Imagine rounding up patients afflicted with a highly infectious disease and ordering them to isolate without outside contact for the rest of their lives. It’s not science fiction, but the history of a Leprosy colony in Louisiana. NPR news correspondent…
America Can’t Back Away From The World Now
Jul 20 • 47 min
We’re well-aware of our globalized world and yet, it still somehow shocked us that a virus that originated in China could upend the lives of millions on our shores. Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations and former senior Middle East…
Eat, Sleep And Breathe … Better
Jul 17 • 49 min
We all know what it takes to live a healthier lifestyle, but with everyday stress piling up, it can be difficult to get started. This hour, host Krys Boyd talks with experts about simple ways to get healthier: a neuroscientist teaches us about the…
An Argument For Reparations
Jul 16 • 47 min
You can draw a straight line from income inequality back to Jim Crow laws and slavery. Therefore, there’s an argument to be made for a monetary path toward addressing those wrongs. William A. Darity Jr., Samuel DuBois Cook Distinguished Professor of…
Citizens Of Other Countries Trust Their Governments. Why Don’t We?
Jul 16 • 48 min
In New York and Florida, contact tracers are unable to track down guests who attended super-spreader events. In New Mexico, officials are pursuing court-ordered quarantines. Why won’t Americans comply with government rules? Wired magazine contributor…
Russian Election Interference Started Way Before 2016
Jul 15 • 47 min
Election interference didn’t start with Russian President Vladimir Putin – and the United States isn’t exactly innocent, either. Yale University fellow David Shimer joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the history of covert programs to influence voters. His…
Can We Safely Reopen Schools?
Jul 15 • 37 min
The CDC says to reopen schools safely, children must wear masks, desks must be pushed six feet apart, and cafeterias should be closed — measures President Trump has called “very tough” and “expensive.” Meanwhile, districts and teachers are preparing to…
Why America Has Always Been A House Divided
Jul 14 • 47 min
The Pledge of Allegiance refers to “one nation, under God, indivisible.” But the reality is that division has been a part of the American experience since the beginning. Journalist Colin Woodard joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the historic struggle to…
The Psychology Of Victimhood
Jul 14 • 47 min
We’ve all sent texts that weren’t returned or been left out of a group. So why is it that some of us can write off these slights when others see themselves as a perpetual victim? Humanistic psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman talks to host Krys Boyd about…
James Baldwin Still Has Something To Say
Jul 13 • 47 min
In the wake of the Civil Rights movement, James Baldwin, with anger and love, documented the work that still needed to be done. And his words still resonate today. Eddie Glaude, Jr., James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Princeton…
Why Science Is So Easy To Dismiss
Jul 13 • 47 min
“Motivated reasoning” is deciding what evidence to believe based on a conclusion that one prefers. Is that why some people wear masks and others don’t? Adrian Bardon, professor of philosophy at Wake Forest University, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about…
The Future Of DACA
Jul 10 • 49 min
The Supreme Court narrowly rejected the Trump administration’s attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – meaning life for its nearly 700,000 participants remains in limbo. In this collaboration between Think and The Texas…
In Defense Of The Suburbs
Jul 9 • 47 min
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said of COVID-19, “If you reduce the density you can reduce the spread.” As we look to a new world laden with pandemic worries, the message might as well be, “get out of town.” Ian Bogost, contributing writer at The Atlantic and…
A Business Approach To Fixing Politics
Jul 9 • 47 min
If your country’s two dominant political parties faced more competition, they might have to reach beyond their bases to stay competitive. Katherine M. Gehl, founder of the Institute for Political Innovation, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about lessons from…
Meet The Woman Behind Some Of TV’s Funniest Characters
Jul 8 • 47 min
Forget “live, laugh, love” – scriptwriter and producer Kari Lizer wants three dogs and more sleep. The creator of “The New Adventures of Old Christine” and an Emmy-nominated co-executive producer of “Will & Grace” joins host Krys Boyd to talk about life…
For The Dying, Dreams Offer Comfort
Jul 8 • 47 min
Patients in hospice care tend to sleep a lot – and those periods of blissful rest can lead to a new way of dreaming. Dr. Christopher Kerr, CEO and chief medical officer at Hospice Buffalo, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about observing end-of-life patients…
Beyond Cattle: How Giraffes And Giant Antelopes Came To Texas
Jul 7 • 48 min
Five-thousand Texas ranches keep at least one exotic animal species. That means everything from antelopes to zebras. Asher Elbein joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what happens when a nilgai meets the cow – and how these nonnative animals are affecting…
Not Black And White: Asian-American Women And Colorism
Jul 7 • 48 min
Asian and Asian-American women often find themselves in a battle against colorism – even from within their own families. Nikki Khanna, associate professor in the department of sociology at the University of Vermont, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how…
How Having An Abortion — Or Not — Affects Women
Jul 6 • 48 min
Reproductive rights make headlines during presidential campaigns and out of the Supreme Court. It’s less common, however, to hear from women with firsthand experience. Diana Greene Foster is a professor in the University of California, San Francisco’s…
How Women Earned The Right To Vote
Jul 6 • 46 min
In August 1920, American women were granted the right to vote. And the reality is, they fought hard to take it. Writer, director and producer Michelle Ferrari joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the passage of the 19th Amendment and the brave women who…
Robert Gates On America’s Post-Cold War Path
Jul 2 • 48 min
Robert Gates, served as secretary of defense under presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, former officer in the United States Air Force and worked for the CIA before being appointed director of the agency. A member of the National Security Council…
The Inner Lives Of Butterflies
Jul 2 • 48 min
From caterpillar to chrysalis to fully formed butterfly, these insects inspire wonder, fascination and a whole world of science exploring their quirks. Journalist Wendy Williams joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the colorful, weird and beautiful ways…
Colson Whitehead Visits The Jim Crow South
Jul 1 • 47 min
Colson Whitehead’s latest novel is based on a real juvenile detention reformatory in 1960s Florida. He joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his story of two boys, bound by the trauma around them as they swing between hope and cynicism. Earlier this year,…
Beyond Borders: What Makes A Nation
Jul 1 • 47 min
Nationalism would seem to be at odds with an increasingly interconnected world. But throughout history, nation-states have always had to navigate a push-pull relationship with places beyond their borders. Thomas Meaney, a fellow at the Max Planck…
Building Cities That Climate Change Won’t Wash Away
Jun 30 • 47 min
Despite its name, a 500-year storm really means there’s 1 in 500 chance of occurring in any given year. Between 2015 to 2017, Houston experienced three—not great odds. Are cities pivoting as quickly to protect citizens? Shayla Love, a senior staff writer…
What Happened The Last Time We Tried To Cut Off Immigation
Jun 30 • 48 min
If there was a flood of immigration at the turn of the century, with the 1924 Immigration Act, it became little more than a trickle. Jia Lynn Yang, deputy national editor at the New York Times, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the lawmakers at the…
How Universities Contribute To Inequality
Jun 26 • 49 min
When the 2019 college admissions scandal broke, it reaffirmed what education scholars already knew: there are severe inequities among who and who is not admitted to colleges and universities. Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center…
We Ask A Lot Of Police — Here’s What We Can Outsource
Jun 25 • 47 min
In addition to law enforcement, our police forces are tasked with plenty of responsibilities that have fallen through the bureaucratic cracks. Patrick Sharkey, professor of sociology and public affairs at New York University and founder of…
Schools Can Create Better Citizens By Returning To Civics
Jun 25 • 47 min
Only two in five Americans can name the three branches of government. Does that correlate with the approximately 80 percent that doesn’t trust the government at all? Rebecca Winthrop, co-director of the Center for Universal Education and a senior fellow…
How We Got To ‘Sesame Street’
Jun 24 • 48 min
Before kids were glued to their phones, they were glued to the TV. And many of them were watching programs about multiculturalism, literacy, and lessons in kindness — often given by a giant yellow bird. David Kamp joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what…
Buckle Up: Driverless Cars Will Change More Than Your Commute
Jun 24 • 48 min
Driverless cars are here — they’re being tested right now in cities across America. The irony is: Even with no one in the driver’s seat, we’re about to encounter more twists and turns in the road than we might be ready for. Anthony M. Townsend joins host…
How Shakespeare Spun Tragedy And Comedy From An Epidemic
Jun 23 • 48 min
In Act 3 of “Romeo and Juliet,” Mercutio delivers the line “a plague on both your houses.” And while it’s a cutting insult, living with the constant dread of illness was, in those days, a part of daily life. Stephen Greenblatt, John Cogan University…
Busting The Myth Of The Texas Rangers
Jun 23 • 47 min
Texans are familiar with the heroics and larger-than-life characters of the Texas Rangers, but behind all that shine is a tarnish to be reckoned with. Doug J. Swanson, writing teacher at the University of Pittsburgh, member of Texas Institute of Letters…
The Politics Of White Anger
Jun 22 • 47 min
What makes someone a “patriot” and another an “agitator”? Oftentimes, the distinction relies heavily on the color of one’s skin. Davin Phoenix, associate professor of political science at the University of California, Irvine, talks to host Krys Boyd about…
A Practical Guide To Fixing Our Democracy
Jun 22 • 47 min
If you have problems with our current system of government, it’s probably of little comfort to know we tweaked it over many decades to work this way. David Litt, a speechwriter for President Obama, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how we became so…
Madame Speaker: The Political Life Of Nancy Pelosi
Jun 19 • 48 min
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi elicits strong opinions from the left and the right. But who is she* really? *Molly Ball, Time magazine’s national political correspondent and a political analyst for CNN, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about Pelosi’s…
Working From Home Can Be Better — Here’s How
Jun 18 • 45 min
Millions of Americans have embraced a new reality centered around Zoom calls and working at the kitchen table. Georgetown University professor Cal Newport joins host Krys Boyd to talk about face-to-face communication vs. computer interfacing and how we…
The Link Between Policing And Segregation
Jun 18 • 50 min
Changing policing methods requires changing a department’s internal culture. There are, however, additional changes that need to happen to the places being policed. Monica Bell of the Yale School of Law joins host Krys Boyd to argue that “segregation rots…
Meet The Formerly Enslaved Woman Who Secured Reparations
Jun 17 • 47 min
Henrietta Wood was a free black woman who won her freedom in 1848, only to be re-enslaved five years later. Rice University historian W. Caleb McDaniel joins host Krys Boyd to tell the story of how Wood ultimately sued and won the largest amount given in…
An Urbanite’s Journey To Understand The Heartland
Jun 17 • 47 min
Broadly speaking, an ideological gap exists between the more liberal coasts and the more conservative “fly-over” states. So why does that divide exist? Marie Mutsuki Mockett, a fiction and nonfiction teacher at Rainier Writing Workshop and visiting writer…
The Argument For Increasing The National Debt
Jun 15 • 48 min
Modern Monetary Theory is a policy position that asks whether the federal government should operate like a household with a balanced budget or more like a change agent. Stephanie Kelton, professor of economics and public policy at Stony Brook University…
When Alexandra Petri Says ‘Everything Is Fine,’ She’s Being Sarcastic
Jun 11 • 47 min
No matter how often we’re told “we’re all in this together,” months of isolation and perpetual bad news still make us want to throw something at the wall. Washington Post humorist and columnist Alexandra Petri joins host Krys Boyd to add her brand of…
The Best Way To Listen To This Show Is While Walking
Jun 11 • 48 min
We all need some self-care these days, so if someone growls at you to “take a hike,” definitely take them up on it. After all, it’s one of the healthiest things you can do. Trinity College Dublin neuroscientist Shane O’Mara joins host Krys Boyd to talk…
Policing: What Not To Do
Jun 10 • 47 min
There’s a stark difference between the image of the friendly neighborhood police officer in a blue uniform and the officer dressed in body armor and riot gear. Seth W. Stoughton is an associate professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law,…
COVID-19 And The Future Of College
Jun 10 • 47 min
Football games, sorority parties, dorm life – not to mention classes – aren’t advisable, even if you’re standing six-feet away wearing a mask. So college administrators are left to rethink what higher education looks like going forward. Paul Quinn College…
They Had 12 Kids – Six Had Schizophrenia
Jun 9 • 48 min
They were the perfect family, until illness took the children, one by one. Robert Kolker joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the Galvin family, which saw schizophrenia take over six of 12 kids – drawing interest from the National Institute of Mental…
How The Economy Survived The 1918 Flu
Jun 9 • 48 min
A side effect of the coronavirus is a rotten economy. So what can a century-old pandemic tell us about how long the downturn will last? Stanford professor Walter Scheidel joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how the 1918 flu took many lives but in the end…
How Protests Shape Public Opinion
Jun 8 • 47 min
Television screens of late have been filled with images of peaceful protests – and of violence. What the media choose to cover helps to form public opinion. Omar Wasow, assistant professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton and co-founder of…
The Trial And Error Of Evolution
Jun 8 • 47 min
Would a rose by any other name smell as sweet? Hard to say – but what we do know is a rose from thousands of years ago probably gave today’s roses their scent. Neil Shubin, Robert R. Bensley Professor of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of…
Britain’s Long Road To Irrelevance
Jun 5 • 48 min
The British Empire was once the largest in history. Now, with the vote to exit the European Union, it becomes an island alone. David Reynolds, professor of international history at Christ’s College, Cambridge and fellow of the British Academy, joins host…
When The Buzz From Buying Stuff Is Gone
Jun 4 • 46 min
What’s the point of buying a new dress when everyone wears sweatpants and T-shirts to Zoom meetings? And who cares about custom suits anymore? Anne Helen Petersen, senior culture writer for BuzzFeed News, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about a history of…
When The People We Elect Don’t Talk, This Is What We Get
Jun 2 • 47 min
Government response to the pandemic has felt very piecemeal – in part because this is a public health crisis that is playing out very differently depending on where you live. Ed Yong covers health and science for The Atlantic, and he joins host Krys Boyd…
COVID-19 And The Future of Sports And Entertainment
Jun 2 • 48 min
If a summer blockbuster plays in a theater with no audience, is it really a summer blockbuster? And is piping in crowd noise really ramping up the excitement of a football game? Brent Lang, executive editor of film and media at Variety and Tom Goldman,…
The Evolution Of Protests
Jun 1 • 47 min
In major cities across the nation this weekend, people gathered to protest the police killings of black Americans. Peniel Joseph is founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at the University of Texas at Austin. He joins host…
Poor And Pregnant In Texas? You Might Want To Move
Jun 1 • 48 min
One-sixth of all uninsured Americans live in Texas, and the number of uninsured Texas women of reproductive age is even higher. ProPublica reporter Nina Martin joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about the critical links between maternal mortality…
A Moral Guide To Economics
May 28 • 48 min
Who is more important, a CEO or a grocery store worker? The pandemic has given us a new lens through which to consider that question. Gene Sperling served as Chief Economic Advisor to Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, and he joins host Krys Boyd…
In Search Of A Fuller Breath
May 28 • 47 min
Breathing is a fundamental part of life – and yet we’re still figuring out how to get better at it. Science writer James Nestor joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how clues can be found not in research labs, but in choir rooms, smoggy streets, and even…
Each Human Life Has A Value (And It’s $10 Million)
May 27 • 48 min
A human life is theoretically invaluable. By assigning a value to a life, though, we’re actually better able to protect them. Adam Rogers, senior correspondent for Wired, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the actuarial models that determine the dollar…
The Truth Is: Conspiracy Theories Are Dangerous
May 27 • 48 min
It’s easy to brush off conspiracy theories as nonsense – until you realize how influential and organized their followers are. Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic, joins host Krys Boyd to talk specifically about QAnon, whose adherents…
Building A Democracy Not Dominated By Dollars
May 26 • 47 min
Money has a way of buying influence in our society. So how do we make sure even those of modest means still have a voice? Lloyd Dumas, Professor of Political Economy, Economics, and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Dallas joins host Krys Boyd…
Who Gets Rich In The Cocaine Trade
May 26 • 48 min
Cocaine is an expensive glamour drug. But that patina of prosperity doesn’t trickle down to the farmers of the coca leaves, who lead lives of poverty and dread. Toby Muse joins host Krys Boyd to talk about his 15 years living in Colombia observing how the…
Beyond Mom, Dad And 2.5 Kids
May 26 • 49 min
This hour, we’ll talk about how people are rethinking the definition of family. New York Times columnist David Brooks joins us to talk about how the “nuclear family” is an outdated concept. We’ll talk about how DNA testing has left some people with more…
The Undervalued Assets Of Black Communities
May 21 • 48 min
Racial zoning, exploitative mortgage rates, white flight — these are just some of the reasons why one part of a city flourishes and another fails. Andre M. Perry, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, joins host Krys…
Emily St. John Mandel On Her New Novel
May 21 • 47 min
Described by the Washington Post as “the perfect novel for your survival bunker,” Emily St. John Mandel’s new book is a tale of international deceit peppered with unusual characters. Her previous book, “Station Eleven,” was a finalist for a National Book…
The Do’s And Don’t’s Of Debt
May 20 • 48 min
Congress has authorized a series of stimulus packages to see Americans through the coronavirus pandemic. But when the panic subsides, who will pay that bill? Atif Mian, John H. Laporte, Jr. Class of 1967 Professor of Economics, Public Policy and Finance…
Presidents’ Lives After The White House
May 20 • 47 min
Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush set the standard of how former presidents can work together when they took the lead on global disaster relief. Journalist Kate Andersen Brower joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the post White House lives of recent…
Science Denial Is Nothing New (Ask Galileo)
May 19 • 47 min
Once, there were only four elements: fire, air, water and earth. When suggested otherwise, the new ideas were met with disbelief. Mario Livio, astrophysicist and author, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about Galileo Galilei, who revolutionized science and,…
The Wisdom Of Trees
May 19 • 47 min
To chart the seasons, look to tree leaves. To understand the past, look inside to the tree’s rings. Valerie Trouet, associate professor in the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what we can…
In An Italian ER, A Doctor Soldiers On
May 18 • 47 min
When parts of Italy were put on lockdown, the Western world was still waking up to a coming pandemic. Filmmaker Sasha Achilli joins host Krys Boyd to tell the story of one ER doctor there and her battle to save a daily swarm of incoming patients inside a…
The Survivors Of Sutherland Springs
May 18 • 46 min
A church welcomes the community to worship inside its halls. So how does it willingly open its doors again after violence shattered lives inside? Houston Chronicle columnist Joe Holley joins host Krys Boyd to tell the story of a small Texas town learning…
Teaching Doctors To See Patients As People
May 14 • 47 min
Patients feel reassured when they have a doctor with a good “bed side manner.” Is that a teachable skill? Dr. Saul J. Weiner, professor of medicine, pediatrics and medical education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, joins host Krys Boyd, to talk…
How COVID Complicates Farm To Table
May 13 • 47 min
When the coronavirus began to spread, it was common for grocery stores to limit toilet paper to one package per customer. Now some stores are placing caps on packages of beef, pork, and chicken. Yossi Sheffi, director of the M.I.T. Center for…
The Year Our World Became Global
May 13 • 47 min
The internet certainly has made our world more interconnected. But to trace the first instances of people connecting the dots worldwide, you’ve got to go back a millennium. Yale historian Valerie Hansen joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the long, winding…
What Will Cities Look Like Post-Pandemic
May 12 • 47 min
Shops and restaurants are part of what make cities vibrant places. And with many of them closed, urban spaces don’t feel the same. Atlantic staff writer Derek Thompson joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how COVID-19 is changing our relationship with the…
A Black Woman Tracks Down Her White Founding Father
May 12 • 47 min
Most of us can trace our family history with paper trails and create intricate family trees. But when your family relies on oral stories passed down through generations, lineage can be hazy. Bettye Kearse joins host Krys Boyd to talk about tracing her own…
One Women’s Quest To Tame Her Depression
May 11 • 47 min
For people with depression, there’s not a one-size-fits-all treatment. Instead, it can be a lengthy, frustrating process to find the right combination of therapy and medication. Anna Mehler Paperny has experienced that search firsthand, and she joins host…
Inventing The Wheel (The First Time)
May 11 • 47 min
Every object that’s part of our lives – everything we eat, buy and use – had to be thought of by somebody. And some of those ideas required quite a bit of vision. Science writer Cody Cassidy joins host Krys Boyd to tell the stories of people who changed…
Fear Is Natural–But It Can Be Controlled
May 7 • 47 min
Unprecedented world events have shaken us. So how do we confront our fears and move on to richer, more optimistic lives? Eva Holland, correspondent for Outside magazine, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her own battle with fear and the methods she…
Meet The Woman Pilots of WWII
May 7 • 47 min
Rosie the Riveter is the most famous example of women pitching in behind-the-scenes during World War II. And while she was keeping factories operational on the ground, more than a thousand women took to the air to help win the war from the sky. Katherine…
You’re More Resilient Than You Think
May 6 • 48 min
Resilience is about facing setbacks head-on and setting new goals after failure. But how do you bounce back when the future is so uncertain? Noam Shpancer, a professor of psychology at Otterbein University, joins host Krys Boyd to talk specifically about…
Losing Charge: The U.S. Is Trailing In The Race For A Better Battery
May 6 • 47 min
American manufacturing is in the midst of a decades-long decline, prompting President Trump and others to find ways to get back to labeling products “Made in America.” ProPublica reporter Lydia DePillis joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how we’ve been…
A Nine Letter Word For Diversion: Crossword
May 5 • 47 min
On social media, pics of families crowded around elaborate jigsaw puzzles are on the rise. Not as picturesque: individuals pouring over their daily crossword puzzles. Still, thousands and thousands of them are definitely out there. Adrienne Raphel joins…
Susan Choi On Her Nation Book Award Winner
May 5 • 47 min
Susan Choi’s “Trust Exercise: A Novel” was a runaway hit last year, delighting readers and critics all the way to a National Book Award. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her story of how power shifts back and forth between students and teachers at a…
MLK and Malcolm X Were More Alike Than You Realize
May 4 • 47 min
The narrative for the Civil Rights movement is that one leader preached non-violence and another encouraged upending the entire system. The reality is that Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X inspired one another and had a lot in common. Peniel E.…