KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme
Black Millennials And A Dream Deferred
Jan 22 • 48 min
Many black millennials have watched as their parents and grandparents faced the reality that the American Dream was just out of their grasp no matter how far they reached. Reniqua Allen joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how this generation is rethinking…
What Happens If We Don’t Turn The Other Cheek
Jan 17 • 48 min
Our laws are fairly accepting when it comes to the use of violence in cases of self-defense. Things are less clear when it comes to defending yourself against officers of the law. Georgetown University professor Jason Brennan joins host Krys Boyd to make…
What Trump Can Do In A State Of Emergency
Jan 17 • 36 min
President Trump said, “I would almost say definitely,” when asked if he is willing to bypass Congress and declare a state of emergency to build the border wall. Elizabeth Goitein, co-director of the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan…
Memes To An End: The Power Of Digital Culture
Jan 16 • 48 min
Internet memes can seem pretty trivial (Grumpy Cat, anyone?). But when used correctly, they can actually tap into the zeitgeist in a way that connects like-minded people across the globe. An Xiao Mina joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how memes, emojis…
What Journalism Does For The Arts
Jan 16 • 37 min
In the last decade, newspapers and other publications have drastically cut the number of arts and culture writers they employ. This hour, host Krys Boyd talks with a panel of critics, artists and journalism teachers about the relationship between an arts…
Why America Still Needs The Rest Of The World
Jan 15 • 47 min
During the Cold War, America had a number of allies ready to join us in the fight against communism. Foreign Affairs magazine editor Gideon Rose joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how these relationships have shifted and softened since those days when the…
The Long, Strange History of Parenting Advice
Jan 15 • 32 min
New parents often bring home their new bundles of joy and immediately discover that when it comes to parenting the advice is limitless and often conflicting. Jennifer Traig – a mother herself – joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how parenting advice has…
When We Talk Ourselves Out Of The Truth
Jan 14 • 39 min
We live in an age when the truth feels more malleable than ever. James Owen Weatherall, professor of logic and philosophy of science at the University of California, Irvine, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the social and psychological factors that lead…
Rethinking How We Treat Depression
Jan 10 • 48 min
More than 250 million people worldwide suffer from depression – and yet treatment has changed very little in the last few decades. University of Cambridge psychiatry professor Edward Bullmore joins host Krys Boyd to talk about possible links between…
How Middle School Grades Boys
Jan 10 • 35 min
The preteen years for kids can be a juncture point in which some will continue a path toward maturity while others will leave their once-sweet selves behind. Ellen McCarthy joins host Krys Boyd to talk specifically about how middle school affects boys.…
For Polite Conversation, Try The Internet
Jan 9 • 48 min
Between Twitter and the comments section, the Internet can seem like a place where polite discussion goes to die. Antonio García Martínez joins host Krys Boyd to turn that narrative on its head. His story “Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help…
The Other O’Keeffe Sister
Jan 9 • 37 min
Ida O’Keeffe was an accomplished artist in her own right – a distinction that her more famous sister, Georgia, worked diligently to cover up. Sue Canterbury, Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, joins host…
The High Cost Of Misdemeanors
Jan 8 • 48 min
Misdemeanors by definition are relatively minor crimes. UC-Irvine law professor Alexandra Natapoff joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how these infractions often tip vulnerable populations into poverty once the legal machine kicks in. Her new book is…
He Came For The Coffee (And Stayed For The War)
Jan 8 • 47 min
As a 24-year-old, Mokhtar Alkhanshali left his life in San Francisco to explore the rich history of coffee farming in his ancestral home of Yemen. And it wasn’t until he arrived that he learned just how difficult it is to leave a country at war. Dave…
How Cancer Doctors Are Tailoring Treatment
Jan 7 • 48 min
Standard treatment for cancer and other diseases involves diagnosing the problem and following a protocol. Science journalist Fran Smith joins host Krys Boyd to talk about a new way of treating disease called precision medicine, in which prevention,…
Losing My Religion
Jan 7 • 48 min
Jessica Wilbanks grew up in the Pentecostal church – a life she left behind at 16. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how her decision alienated her from her fundamentalist parents – and about the difficult process of charting her own spiritual path,…
A Lesson In Texas Mythology
Jan 4 • 48 min
W.F. Strong is beloved by public radio listeners for his popular “Stories from Texas” segment that airs on The Texas Standard. He joins guest host John McCaa to tell some tales – some tall, some not – and to talk about the mythology that surrounds the…
How We’re Still Funding The Civil War
Jan 2 • 48 min
As American cities debate what to do with Confederate monuments, many will be surprised to learn that over the last decade, taxpayers have spent $40 million on the preservation of these statues and Confederate heritage organizations. Brian Palmer of the…
Texans Of The Year
Jan 2 • 47 min
Each year, The Dallas Morning News looks back at the previous 12 months to determine the Texan of the Year. Elizabeth Souder and Brendan Miniter of the paper’s editorial board join guest host John McCaa to talk about the finalists, which include Dallas…
A Playwright Remembers His Border Childhood
Dec 20, 2018 • 48 min
Octavio Solis grew up in El Paso before becoming one of America’s most accomplished Latino playwrights. He joins host Krys Boyd to tell stories of his younger days along the Rio Grande – and how they influenced his life and work. He gathers these…
When Slavery Uproots Your Family Tree
Dec 20, 2018 • 48 min
The digitization of records and their availability online has offered unprecedented access for amateur genealogists. Kenyatta D. Berry, host of “Genealogy Roadshow” on PBS, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about using this information to build a story of your…
How We’ve Used Anne Frank
Dec 20, 2018 • 47 min
Anne Frank is the most well-known of the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust because of the diary she kept during her young life. Dara Horn joins us to talk about what Frank’s writings say about the person she would have become – and to introduce us…
Estrangement As Salvation
Dec 19, 2018 • 49 min
Estrangement is a situation that touches parents and their children, siblings and even lifelong friends. Harriet Brown joins us to talk about the building blocks that eventually create walls between loved ones – and about her fractured relationship with…
Gene Editing As A Cure For Deafness
Dec 19, 2018 • 47 min
Researchers are currently testing a form of gene editing on mice that could hold the cure for many people born deaf. Science writer Dina Fine Maron joins host Krys Boyd to explain a fascinating procedure in which edited genes are attached to a virus and…
The Many Ways Presidents Leave The White House
Dec 18, 2018 • 48 min
With Democrats set to take control of the U.S. House of Representatives in January, some are already banging the drum for impeachment hearings for President Trump. David Priess, who served in both the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush White Houses, joins…
The Surprising Future Of American Jews
Dec 18, 2018 • 48 min
American Jews have established themselves in virtually every facet of American life. And that integration opens up a new set of challenges. Harvard Law professor Robert H. Mnookin joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how intermarriage, decreased religious…
Rethinking Recycling
Dec 17, 2018 • 48 min
The United States recycles about 34 percent of its waste – a number that hasn’t increased much in decades. Beth Porter, climate and recycling director for Green America, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about recycling strategies for both individuals and…
Want To Kill The Middle Class? Try Tariffs
Dec 17, 2018 • 48 min
Earlier this month, the United States and China called a temporary truce in the countries’ months-long trade war, though difficult negotiations are required for the peace to hold. Matthew Rooney, managing director of the Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth…
Why Your Grandma Says That
Dec 14, 2018 • 48 min
Every weekend, Martha Barnett and Grant Barrett take a deep dive into the nuances of how we communicate with each other on their public radio show “A Way With Words.” They join us to talk about what they’ve learned about the regional and generational…
Erasing The Link Between Art And Architecture
Dec 13, 2018 • 48 min
Daniel Libeskind designed New York’s World Trade Center Redevelopment and many, many other significant projects around the world. He joins us to talk about his approach to architecture – and why he says anyone can do it. His new book on his life’s work is…
Who Or Whom? Who Cares.
Dec 13, 2018 • 47 min
As much as our English teachers would like us to follow the laws of grammar, language has a way of developing organically. Lane Greene joins us to talk about how language evolves despite all those rules, which he writes about in “Talk on the Wild Side:…
The Ethics Of Editing Babies
Dec 12, 2018 • 48 min
Late last month, Chinese researcher He Jiankui opened a Pandora’s Box with his announcement that he’s edited the genes of twin girls. Science writer Ed Yong joins us to talk about how the prospect of designer babies has rocked the scientific community,…
How White Gatekeepers Restrain Black Thinkers
Dec 11, 2018 • 48 min
In a new essay, Mychal Denzel Smith writes, “The white audience does not seek out black public intellectuals to challenge their worldview; instead they are meant to serve as tour guides through a foreign experience that the white audience wishes to keep…
Trading A C-Suite For A Cop’s Beat
Dec 11, 2018 • 47 min
As enforcers of the law, police officers are charged with leading exemplary lives – even as they interact with criminals on a daily basis. Sarah Cortez has spent two decades as a beat cop – a profession she took up after a career climbing the corporate…
Why We Should Be Talking About Rape
Dec 10, 2018 • 48 min
As a 17-year-old living in Mumbai, Sohaila Abdulali survived a gang rape. And in the decades since, she’s worked to chart a new path to healing. Abdulali joins us to talk about whether or not rape is a life-defining moment – and if we can create a world…
What Happens After Exoneration
Dec 10, 2018 • 47 min
When a prisoner is exonerated, a wrong has been righted. Lara Bazelon joins us to talk about how these victories can actually lead to longer periods of despair for both the wrongfully convicted and the victim who can no longer claim justice. Bazelon’s new…
George Saunders’ Fable For Adults
Dec 7, 2018 • 48 min
George Saunders received critical acclaim – and a Man Booker Prize – for his 2017 novel “Lincoln in the Bardo.” He joins us to talk about his latest work, “Fox 8” (Random House), a darkly comedic short story of a fox who learns to speak.
Sons Of The Founding Fathers
Dec 6, 2018 • 48 min
Most Americans have at least a passing familiarity with George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and their contemporaries. UT-Austin historian H.W. Brands joins us to talk about the men who took the baton from the Founding Fathers and put their…
Your Brain On Art
Dec 6, 2018 • 48 min
A visit to a museum can provoke a long list of questions: How does this piece make me feel? Is what I’m looking at any good? And who gets to decide what makes something a work of art? Ellen Winner, director of the Arts and Mind Lab at Boston College,…
The World’s Most Violent Places Are Not At War
Dec 5, 2018 • 48 min
Colombia and Mexico regularly see their share of violent activity – even though they aren’t engaged in a formal war. Rachel Kleinfeld of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace joins us to talk about how corruption, political conflict and state…
You Love It When People Fail – Here’s Why
Dec 5, 2018 • 48 min
When that jerk at work spills coffee all over his shirt, we laugh, right? Turns out that’s a natural – and common – response. Tiffany Watt Smith joins us to talk about why we find perverse pleasure in the pain of others. Her new book is called…
Meet The Women Who Fought The Taliban
Dec 4, 2018 • 48 min
In the battle against the Taliban, women serving in the armed forces have played a key role in circumventing a patriarchal society to gather information from Afghan women. Eileen Rivers of USA Today – and a veteran of Operation Desert Storm – joins us to…
Swimming With Cephalopods
Dec 4, 2018 • 48 min
Cephalopods are amazing creatures – capable of complex learning, chameleon-like fluidity and lighting quick dexterity. Mike Vecchione, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries National Systematics Laboratory, joins us to…
Being Amy Sedaris
Dec 3, 2018 • 48 min
Amy Sedaris began making us laugh with her television series “Strangers with Candy” and is still cracking us up with her role on “BoJack Horseman.” She joins us to talk about her career in the funny business. Sedaris is the recipient of this year’s Ernie…
In Defense Of Puns
Nov 30, 2018 • 48 min
A snappy comeback, delivered with just the right amount of zing, can make you the life of the party or the hero of the office. James Geary joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the importance of wit in everyday life, and to make the case that puns – yes…
Examining America’s Founding Truths
Nov 29, 2018 • 48 min
Thomas Jefferson said that the American experiment depended on three truths. Harvard historian Jill Lepore joins host Krys Boyd to talk about political equality, natural rights and the sovereignty of the people through a 21stCentury lens. Her new book is…
Surprise: Placebos Are Effective
Nov 29, 2018 • 48 min
Clinical trials include a placebo to guard against misleading results. So what should we make of cases when placebo groups also improve? Gary Greenberg joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the possibility that the placebo effect might actually provide real…
Growing Up Queer: What Kids Need To Know
Nov 28, 2018 • 48 min
Kids questioning their sexual identity have more resources than ever. Still, the road to clarity can be arduous. Kelly Madrone joins host Krys Boyd to talk about ways to help struggling children and their parents along that path. Madrone’s book is called…
Rape Cases Are Being Closed – Not Solved
Nov 28, 2018 • 48 min
The criminal justice system has many ways of clearing rape cases. But a case being closed isn’t the same as justice served. Newsy reporter Mark Greenblatt joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how police departments across the country are using a federal…
The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly Of Identity Politics
Nov 27, 2018 • 48 min
With white nationalists, anti-immigrant populists, liberal academics and many other fractious groups, identity politics is having an outsized effect on the nation as a whole. Stanford University fellow Francis Fukuyama joins host Krys Boyd to talk about…
Who Says You Can’t Have More Than One Religion?
Nov 27, 2018 • 48 min
When someone has, say, a Jewish father and Christian mother, it’s common to inherit spiritual practices from each. Duane R. Bidwell of the Claremont School of Theology joins host Krys Boyd to talk about people who find it limiting to practice just one…
Waiting In The Age Of Instant Gratification
Nov 26, 2018 • 48 min
Some of the most unnerving times in our lives are when we’re waiting for news – good or bad. Jason Farman, director of the Design Cultures & Creativity Program at the University of Maryland, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how patience has been a…
The Many Facades Of Philip Johnson
Nov 26, 2018 • 48 min
If you’ve ever visited the Fort Worth Water Gardens or Dallas’ Thanks-Giving Square, you can thank Philip Johnson. Dallas Morning News architecture critic Mark Lamster joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the designer’s influence on North Texas and the…
To Infinity … And Beyond!
Nov 21, 2018 • 48 min
Space is a subject that fascinates kids and adults alike. This hour, we’re revisiting some of our favorite conversations about the cosmos, talking about the significance of discovering liquid water on Mars, what we know about the origins of the sun and…
Thanksgiving Is A Made-Up Holiday (And That’s OK)
Nov 21, 2018 • 48 min
By now, most adults know the first Thanksgiving didn’t quite go down the way we were taught in school. Anthropologist Jack David Eller joins us to talk about how American holidays and customs are largely borrowed from other cultures or created from myths.…
How Travel Apps Can Steer You Wrong
Nov 20, 2018 • 48 min
As the New York Times Frugal Traveler columnist, Seth Kugel visited more than 50 countries in search of rich experiences for the less-than-rich. He joins us to talk about why sticking to a limited budged can actually produce a more rewarding trip, which…
Why Working Mothers Can’t Win
Nov 20, 2018 • 48 min
Parenting can be particularly difficult for working mothers, seeing as that working fathers are usually just known as “fathers.” Amy Westervelt joins us to talk about her experiences balancing work and parenting, which included checking in with her boss…
Americans Are Scared Of The Wrong Things
Nov 19, 2018 • 48 min
With nuclear threats, natural disasters and social unrest, it feels like scary times, doesn’t it? Sociologist Barry Glassner joins us to talk about why our perception of these threats doesn’t line up with the reality of trouble striking. His best-selling…
Alone At The South Pole
Nov 19, 2018 • 48 min
Two men – one American, one Brit – are each attempting to become the first person to cross Antarctica on foot unassisted. New Yorker staff writer David Grann joins us to talk about Henry Worsley, a British special forces officer who gave it a shot in 2015…
Haunted By Mental Illness
Nov 16, 2018 • 48 min
Lindsay Wong grew up in a family full of mental illness. But instead of seeking treatment, her grandmother and mother blamed their maladies on ghosts who haunted the living. Wong joins us to talk about how the stigma surrounding mental illness affected…
How Eggplants Have Sex
Nov 15, 2018 • 48 min
The fruits, vegetables, legumes and other foods that wind up on our tables all have something in common: They made it there because of sex. University of California, Riverside genetics professor Norman C. Ellstrand joins us to talk about the mechanics of…
Bring Back The Trust-Busters
Nov 15, 2018 • 48 min
Some of our most important industries – banking, technology, pharmaceuticals – are controlled by just a handful of companies. Columbia University professor Tim Wu joins us to talk about the link between concentrated industrial influence and concentrated…
Fresh From The Lab: It’s Your Dinner
Nov 14, 2018 • 48 min
Humanity approaches pets and even endangered species with kindness. Jacy Reese joins us to talk about how the next step in expanding our morality is to extend that same compassion to animals we raise for food. His new book is called “The End of Animal…
Greed is Not Good – Here’s Why
Nov 13, 2018 • 48 min
CEOs and company boards have a duty to maximize shareholder profits. Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist Steven Pearlstein joins us to talk about how this mission has widened the American wealth gap – and about how a return to one of Adam…
The Best School Is Out There
Nov 12, 2018 • 48 min
We all want our kids to receive a good education. But what constitutes a “good education?” Ken Robinson joins us to talk about how parents can guide their children to the right school and see that they make the most of their time in the classroom. His…
The Unseen Creatures We Live With
Nov 9, 2018 • 48 min
Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is…
Developing Health Care In The Developing World
Nov 8, 2018 • 48 min
Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is…
Throwing Shade — The Shakespearean Way
Nov 8, 2018 • 48 min
Citizens of Elizabethan England had very particular ways of thumbing their noses at others – from well-timed zingers to strategic Shakespeare quotes. Historian Ruth Goodman joins us for a rollicking trip back to a low-brow time, the subject of her book…
The Balancing Act Of Black Women
Nov 7, 2018 • 48 min
Black women often find themselves in a no-win situation. Call out racism and risk being seen as an agitator, or stay quiet and feel like part of the problem. University of Washington, Seattle associate professor of communications Ralina L. Joseph joins us…
The Midterm Elections: What The Results Mean
Nov 7, 2018 • 48 min
Did the Democrats retake the House? Was Ted Cruz able to hold off Beto O’Rourke? This week, we finally get the answers to those long-simmering questions and many others. We talk about the major storylines of the midterm elections with Rebecca Deen, chair…
The Founding Fathers Weigh In On Politics Today
Nov 6, 2018 • 48 min
Between politicians and federal judges, public figures talk a lot about what the Founding Fathers intended in the words they wrote to form the nation. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis joins us to examine the thought processes of…
The Literary Foundation Of Black Lives Matter
Nov 6, 2018 • 48 min
The Black Lives Matter movement was birthed by a hashtag just a few years ago. The call for equality and dignity, however, dates back much further. Johns Hopkins University philosopher Christopher J. Lebron joins us to walk through the history of American…
Why Learning To Read Is Still So Hard
Nov 5, 2018 • 48 min
Reading is one of the most studied aspects of human learning. And yet, students are rarely taught to read using scientifically proven methods. Emily Hanford, senior education correspondent for APM Reports, joins us to talk about why educators are failing…
An Hour Of Running With Peter Sagal
Nov 5, 2018 • 48 min
Every Saturday, public radio listeners tune into “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me” to catch up on the week that was and have a few laughs. Host Peter Sagal travels the country with the show, and the one thing he never forgets to pack is his running shoes. He…
When American Politics Was Really Divisive
Nov 2, 2018 • 48 min
If you think Congress is a messy place now, you should’ve been there in the run-up to the Civil War. Yale history professor Joanne Freeman joins guest host John McCaa to talk about a time when pistols were routinely drawn and all-out brawls frequently…
A Conversation With Ireland’s Ambassador To The U.S.
Nov 1, 2018 • 48 min
As Great Britain continues its Brexit negotiations with the E.U., one of the sticking points is the necessity for a physical border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. Daniel Mulhall, Ireland’s ambassador to the United States, joins us to talk about how…
What Single-Payer Health Care Might Really Look Like
Nov 1, 2018 • 48 min
Single-payer health care was one of Bernie Sanders’ campaign promises during his presidential run. And the baton has been picked up by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Beto O’Rourke and other prominent Democrats. Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, editor-in-chief of…
Gun Ownership: Why It’s Different For Black People
Oct 31, 2018 • 48 min
About a quarter of all African-Americans own a gun – and that number is on the rise. RJ Young is one of them, and he joins us to talk about his experience as an NRA-certified pistol instructor and about the differences between white and black gun culture.…
Have This Talk Before It’s Too Late
Oct 31, 2018 • 48 min
Death may be the one topic that nobody likes to talk about. Michael Hebb joins us to talk about why it’s important to engage with friends and loved ones about end-of-life wishes – and to offer practical tips for getting the conversation started. His new…
The Ups And Downs Of Facebook
Oct 30, 2018 • 48 min
For the last decade, Facebook has helped people separated by physical distance to reconnect and remain close. And it’s also been the place where those same people have found themselves alienated from one another because of both real and fake news. James…
Why Safe Spaces Make Students Less Resilient
Oct 30, 2018 • 48 min
College campuses were once safe spaces for the exchange of ideas. These days, though, both professors and students often feel as if they’re walking on eggshells. We talk with social psychologist Jonathan Haidt to explain why we’re setting students up to…
A Novel Of The Modern Native American
Oct 29, 2018 • 48 min
In Tommy Orange’s debut novel, “There, There” (Knopf), 12 Native Americans living in Oakland intersect at the Big Oakland Powwow. The book has been hailed by readers and critics alike, and we talk with Orange about creating native characters who…
The Greatest Battle The Marines Didn’t Win
Oct 29, 2018 • 48 min
The two-week fight at the Chosin Reservoir was one of the decisive battles of the Korean War – and one of the seminal moments in the history of the Marine Corps. We talk with historian Hampton Sides about the courageous Marines who braved sub-zero…
What Makes People Vote
Oct 25, 2018 • 49 min
Nearly every major national story-line of the last year has been funneled through the lens of the midterm elections. This hour, we look at voting in America past and present. We’ll start with a conversation with Pew Research Center senior researcher Alec…
How Presidents Make War
Oct 25, 2018 • 48 min
The most trying time for any inhabitant of the Oval Office is when the nation is at war. Historian Michael Beschloss joins us to talk about how presidents have navigated Congress, the press and the American people in guiding the country through armed…
When The Brain Rebels
Oct 25, 2018 • 48 min
People who suffer from epilepsy can find it difficult to move forward in life while under the constant threat of experiencing an episode. That was Kurt Eichenwald’s experience, and he joins us to talk about this often misunderstood condition – and how…
A Rape Survivor On Justice And Mercy
Oct 24, 2018 • 48 min
Our legal system has methods for punishing perpetrators of sexual assault. But prison time for the guilty doesn’t necessarily equal peace for the victim. Lacy Johnson joins us to talk about her own experience as a sexual assault survivor – and about how…
The Modern World Closes In On The Amazon
Oct 24, 2018 • 48 min
Logging operations are tempted by the Amazon and its vast forestland. Scott Wallace joins us to talk about how that thirst for lumber and other natural resources is threatening indigenous groups in Brazil and Peru. His story “Isolated Nomads Are Under…
The Evolution Of Empathy
Oct 23, 2018 • 48 min
The concept of empathy is only a little more than a century old. And yet how we define empathy has changed many times and in subtle ways. Historian Susan Lanzoni joins us to talk about how we’ve wrestled with the intersection of our own experience and the…
The Roots Of Black Lives Matter
Oct 22, 2018 • 48 min
The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2012 following the death of Trayvon Martin and gained steam two years later during the Ferguson uprising. University of Illinois at Chicago professor Barbara Ransby joins host us to talk about what Black Lives…
Mobs vs. Mexicans In Texas History
Oct 22, 2018 • 48 min
In the early decades of the 20th Century, Texas law enforcement and vigilantes killed Mexican citizens with little worry of legal consequences. Brown University assistant professor Monica Muñoz Martinez joins us to talk about how the families of these…
Computer Scientists Are Obsessed With Termites
Oct 19, 2018 • 48 min
Termites gobble up $40 billion worth of our stuff annually. Lisa Margonelli joins host joins to talk about these largely misunderstood insects, whose collective power may one day actually be harnessed for good. Her new book is called “Underbug: An…
The Forgotten Poverty Of Rural Whites
Oct 18, 2018 • 48 min
Sarah Smarsh grew up in a long line of poor wheat farmers in rural Kansas. She joins us to talk about how working-class poverty stretches across generations – and about our troubling tendency as a nation to judge people based on their wealth. Her new book…
Why America Should Take Care Of The World
Oct 18, 2018 • 48 min
As part of his “America First” policy, President Trump has pushed for a reduction in our involvement in global affairs. Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution joins us to make the case that this strategy leaves a leadership void that will likely make…
Can A Carbon Tax Curb Climate Change?
Oct 17, 2018 • 42 min
A report released last week by the United Nations predicts climate change could lead to worsening food shortages and a host of natural disasters as soon as 2040. Jeff Nesbit, executive director of Climate Nexus, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the…
The Risk Of Government Brain Drain
Oct 17, 2018 • 48 min
Much of our attention to government focuses on the Senate confirmation of judges and senior officials. Michael Lewis joins us to talk about the grunts who keep the federal government machine moving — and about how that machine is in danger of grinding to…
A Soldier, A Ghost, Shared Love And Betrayal
Oct 16, 2018 • 48 min
Eden Malcolm spends each day in his hospital bed, unable to communicate with his wife and young daughter. That is until the day he wakes up alone and rediscovers the spark of life. Eden is the creation of Elliot Ackerman, who joins us to tell the story of…
Us Vs. Them (And Everyone Else In The Middle)
Oct 16, 2018 • 48 min
It feels as if America is split down the middle between liberals and conservatives. The truth, though, is that we’re divided into even more significant, smaller factions. Researcher Daniel Yudkin joins us to take a more accurate and nuanced look at what…
The History of Impeachment
Oct 15, 2018 • 48 min
Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton each served as president of the United States — and each faced impeachment while in office. Jeffrey A. Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, joins us to take a balanced look at the…
Gaslighting: The Abuse Is Real
Oct 15, 2018 • 48 min
“Gaslighting” is the manipulative technique sociopaths, narcissists and others use to control people. Family counselor Stephanie Moulton Sarkis joins us to talk about how we can spot this pattern of lies, distractions and distortions of the truth, which…