KERA's Think

KERA's Think

www.kera.org/think
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainme
Syrian Refugees Are Still Dying
May 23 • 48 min
Every day, refugees are rescued while trying to cross the Mediterranean for a better life in Europe. As a pediatrician, Dr. Seema Jilani has been aboard those rescue boats, pulling people out of the water to save their lives. She joins us to talk about…
Come Together: A Guide To Better Parties And Meetings
May 23 • 48 min
Even if we like the people we’re around, so often our interfaces revolve around mindless small talk and boring meeting agendas. Priya Parker has studied how people around the world are making the most of the time they spend together, and she joins us to…
Are You Part Of The American Aristocracy?
May 21 • 48 min
The “1 percent” is the typical target for those upset by income inequality. Matthew Stewart joins us to talk about why that ire should be broadened to include a larger chunk of the populace. His story “The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy”…
Is Democracy Bad For Economic Growth?
May 21 • 48 min
The 20th Century growth of global democracy fostered a history-making economic boom for many. But stagnant wages and growing inequality over the last few decades have frustrated millions and inspired nationalist and protectionist political movements. In…
Inside The Life Of Robin Williams
May 18 • 34 min
While his one-of-a-kind humor made millions of TV viewers laugh in “Mork & Mindy” and his thoughtful approach to character garnered an Oscar for “Good Will Hunting,” Robin Williams also struggled with addiction, self-doubt and depression. New York Times…
Businesses Are Bracing For Political Surprise
May 17 • 48 min
The world just isn’t slowing down and today everything from global conflicts and terrorist actions, to hackers and even individual Twitter users can impact our lives and organizations like never before. Amy B. Zegart, senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover…
Can You Cure A Sex Offender?
May 17 • 48 min
High-profile accusations and convictions of sexual assault have made lots of headlines this year. There has been less reporting though, about what happens to the perpetrators of sex crimes – who often end up in mandatory therapy. We’ll talk this hour with…
What Woodrow Wilson Got Right — And Wrong
May 16 • 48 min
Woodrow Wilson faced many challenges as the 28th President of the United States – including the terrors of World War I in Europe and growing dissent and social pressures at home. Presidential biographer Patricia O’Toole joins us to discuss the Wilson…
Bad Teeth Will Hold You Back
May 15 • 48 min
Good teeth are important for everything from eating healthy to being able to smile confidently when you’re happy. The high cost of insurance though and lack of access to basic dental care in many rural, minority and poor communities is creating haves and…
Xi Jinping’s Vision Of A Global China
May 15 • 48 min
Big changes are underway in China and the country is reworking its image in the wider world as well. China expert Elizabeth C. Economy joins us to talk about what a global China might mean for the future. Her new book is “The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping…
When Black America Championed Mass Incarceration
May 14 • 48 min
America’s war on crime began in the 1970s and was strongly supported by black leaders in some of the country’s largest cities. Former public defender James Forman Jr. joins us to talk about how policies from that era lead to an overrepresentation of…
Don’t Believe Everything You See
May 14 • 48 min
French director Jean-Luc Godard famously said that “cinema is truth 24 frames-per-second.” Video editing is bringing that idea into question, though. Franklin Foer joins us to talk about how manipulation of digital video is chipping away what we consider…
What You Didn’t Know About Paul Simon
May 11 • 48 min
When running down the list of great American songwriters, it doesn’t take long to get to Paul Simon. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer collaborated with music critic Robert Hilburnon a definitive biography, and Hilburn joins us to talk about the book,“Paul…
Close Encounters With Pluto
May 10 • 48 min
In 2015, a spacecraft calledNew Horizonsflew by Pluto at 32,000 miles per hour, taking pictures all along the way.Alan Sternled the planning of the mission for NASA, and he joins us to talk about the years of work that went into sending the New Horizon…
A Family Wrestles Its Demons In Real Time
May 10 • 48 min
Stephen Karam’splay“The Humans”won the 2016 Tony Award for best play and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A production of the show visits theWinspear Opera HouseMay 8-20, and its star,Richard Thomas, joins us to talk about its story of aging parents…
A Chinese Boy, His Lost Mother, And His New White Parents
May 9 • 48 min
Lisa Ko was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award for fiction for her debut novel, “The Leavers” (Algonquin Books). She joins us to talk about her story of a young boy adopted by a pair of white professors after his Chinese immigrant mother…
The Fight For The Soul Of America
May 9 • 48 min
With income inequality, rising racism and deep division on gun control and other issues, it can feel like a dire time in America. Jon Meacham joins us to provide historical evidence that we’ve made it through tough times before – and about why those…
The Duplass Brothers On Sharing An Identity
May 8 • 48 min
Mark and Jay Duplass seemingly have the Midas touch in Hollywood. As actors, writers and producers, they’ve been involved in “Transparent,” “The Mindy Project,” “Togetherness,” “Wild Wild Country” and many, many other projects. The siblings join us to…
America: Stuck Between Two Borders
May 8 • 48 min
As a native of South Texas, Stephanie Elizondo Griest has witnessed the struggles of undocumented immigrants crossing the border from Mexico. And when she moved near the Canadian border, she noticed similarities in how the U.S. has treated Native…
The Politics of Barbie’s Body
May 7 • 48 min
For nearly 60 years, young girls have brushed Barbie’s hair, taken her for a spin in her convertible and wondered what it would be like to live in that Dream House. Andrea Nevins joins us to talk about the profound effect this 11.5 inch-tall doll has had…
Is It Illegal To Be Mentally Ill?
May 7 • 48 min
For many mentally ill people, prison is a more likely landing spot than a hospital. Alisa Roth joins us to talk about how the criminal justice system is unprepared to treat these people – and about how the courts might rethink our prosecution of the…
Marcia Gay Harden Remembers What Her Mom No Longer Can
May 4 • 48 min
Marcia Gay Harden’s mother, Beverly, loved arranging flowers – a skill she learned while living in Asia. It’s through that lens that the Oscar-winning Texan tells Beverly’s story of love, loss and eventual struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. Her new book…
‘Why I Stopped Being A Skinhead’
May 3 • 48 min
As a teenager, Christian Picciolini joined a neo-Nazi group and charted a path for a life of violence and racism. He joins us to talk about how a moment of racial violence shook him out of his ways, which he writes about in “White American Youth: My…
Who Has Guns, Who Doesn’t, And Why
May 3 • 48 min
The National Rifle Association opens its annual convention today in Dallas. Juliana Menasce Horowitz of the Pew Research Center joins us to talk about America’s complex relationship with guns, the subject of a study she lead.
Riding The Rails: Life As A Drifter
May 2 • 48 min
Drifters maintain a constant state of motion, crisscrossing the country untethered to a physical address. TCU sociologist Jeff Ferrell joins us to talk about what he learned by spending time in these ephemeral communities, which he writes about in “Drift:…
Ronan Farrow On The Gutting Of American Diplomacy
May 2 • 48 min
Ronan Farrow won the Pulitzer Prize this year for his reporting on sexual misconduct in Hollywood. Before he was a journalist, though, he worked in the state department. As newly minted Secretary of State Mike Pompeo takes over the department, Farrow…
The Security Of Stuff
May 1 • 48 min
If you’ve ever named your car or owned a favorite T-shirt, you know that these everyday objects are more than just things. Francine Russo joins us to talk about the psychology behind why we get so attached to some objects – to the point where we assign…
My Party, My Identity
May 1 • 48 min
We’re at the point in our political discourse that many diehard Democrats and Republicans can’t even debate policy issues because to compromise at all is to concede a part of themselves. University of Maryland political scientist Lilliana Mason joins us…
Exonerated And Motivated
Apr 30 • 48 min
After serving a combined 60 years for crimes they didn’t commit, a trio of former inmates opened a detective agency in Dallas to investigate other wrongful convictions. Christopher Scott – one of the three – joins us to talk about how he rebuilt his life…
How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Became RBG
Apr 30 • 48 min
In her 25 years on the bench, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has reliably sided with the Supreme Court’s liberal wing. The 85-year-old’s life is the subject of the new documentary “RBG,” and its directors Betsy West and Julie Cohen join us to talk about Ginsburg’s…
How The Cowboys Cheerleaders Became America’s Team
Apr 27 • 48 min
In 1976, Suzanne Mitchell took over control of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders, transforming the troupe – and the gameday experience – forever. The documentary “Daughters of the Sexual Revolution: The Untold Story of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders”…
We Can’t See Them, But They’re Everywhere
Apr 26 • 48 min
For all of the natural world that we can see, there are millions upon millions of tiny organisms we can’t see. Eugenia Bone studies these microbes, and she joins us to talk about their outsized impact on our daily lives. Her new book is called “Microbia:…
What Your Dog’s Really Thinking And Feeling
Apr 26 • 48 min
Dogs may be man’s best friend – but they’ve got a strange way of showing it sometimes. Evolutionary biologist Marc Bekoff joins us to talk about the curious habits of our four-legged friends – and about how observing them closely can bring us closer to…
The Invisible Victims Of Sexual Assault
Apr 25 • 48 min
Every day, women head into fields, hotels and houses to pick crops, make beds and care for other people’s children. And along with low pay and long hours, they endure sexual harassment and assault. Investigative journalist Bernice Yeung joins us to talk…
Islamophobia Didn’t Begin With 9/11
Apr 25 • 48 min
Islamophobia has been ever present since Sept. 11, 2001. Its roots in America, though, go back centuries. University of Detroit Mercy associate law professor Khaled A. Beydoun joins us to talk about how anti-Muslim ideas have been ingrained in our legal…
Two Sisters, One Mental Illness
Apr 24 • 48 min
In the novel “Everything Here Is Beautiful” (Pamela Dorman Books), older sister Miranda dutifully watches over her unpredictable sibling, Lucia. Author Mira T. Lee joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about how Lucia’s developing mental illness tests…
America’s First Processed Food
Apr 23 • 48 min
Imagine living in the 19th Century, in a time when many Americans only ate the foods they produced themselves. Oklahoma State University researcher Anna Zeide joins us to talk about the development of prepackaged food – and how the industry earned the…
Why Economists And Politicians Don’t Speak The Same Language
Apr 23 • 48 min
On the campaign trail, candidate Donald Trump promised to toughen up our trade relationship with China. And now, after an exchange of import tariffs, many economists fear we may be on the way to a trade war. Princeton economics professor Alan S. Blinder…
The Human Toll Of America’s Endless Wars
Apr 20 • 48 min
For the last 17 years, we’ve asked our service members to deploy to Iraq and Afghanistan. Yet the question “What are we fighting for?” is becoming increasingly difficult to answer.Phil Klay served in Iraq as a Marine, and he joins us to talk about how…
How Bad Science Becomes Government Policy
Apr 19 • 48 min
When scientific journals publish new research, an opportunity is created for independent researchers to reproduce a study’s results. David Randall, director of research for the National Association of Scholars, joins us to talk about why many studies are…
From Anonymous: Advice Columns Through The Decades
Apr 19 • 48 min
Advice columnists are often no more qualified to dispense wisdom than your friend or neighbor. What they do offer, though, is the chance to ask our tricky questions anonymously. Jessica Weisberg joins us to talk about the role Ann Landers, Dan Savage,…
The Upside Of Change
Apr 18 • 48 min
Change can be hard for even the most adventurous among us. Our brain’s ability to do things differently, though, is one of the traits that separates us from other creatures. Leonard Mlodinow joins us to talk about how we can train our brains to embrace…
Texas’ Problems Are America’s Problems
Apr 18 • 48 min
Texas looks like a state that could’ve been designed by Donald Trump with its low taxes and minimal regulations. And it’s been more than 20 years since a Democrat has been elected to statewide office. On the other hand, its urban centers are reliably blue…
A City-Based Solution To Climate Change
Apr 17 • 48 min
Much of the conversation around climate change centers on how governments can address the problem. Carl Pope, former head of the Sierra Club, joins us to talk about why environmentalists should look beyond elected officials for action. His book, written…
Are Gangs And Frats The Same?
Apr 17 • 48 min
When Ibram X. Kendi was growing up in Queens, he witnessed the brutal initiation process gangs put new members through. And when he got to college, he saw that process play out again in fraternities. Kendi, director of the Antiracist Research and Policy…
To Touch A Tornado: The Life Of A Storm Chaser
Apr 16 • 48 min
Tim Samaras’ fascination with tornados began as a kid watching “The Wizard of Oz.” And that obsession drove him to become one of America’s greatest storm chasers. Brantley Hargrove joins us to talk about how Samaras risked his life to learn all he could,…
Crafting Calm: Using Your Hands To Free Your Mind
Apr 13 • 48 min
For dedicated crafters, knitting someone a scarf is about more than creating a homemade gift. Alanna Okun joins us to talk about how a simple roll of yarn and a set of needles can offer a sense of control in a chaotic world. Her new book is called “The…
Wellness Is Fine – But We’re All Gonna Die
Apr 12 • 49 min
It seems as if so much of our daily living is focused on not dying. And for all of our efforts, death comes for us all. Barbara Ehrenreich joins us to make the case that we should stop expending so much energy on wellness and let go of the idea that we…
A Conversation With Tyra Banks (And Her Mom!)
Apr 11 • 48 min
It’s easy to assume that Tyra Banks has been a success at everything she’s ever tried – from modeling to television to the business world. She – along with her mother, Carolyn London – joins us to talk about the behind-the-scenes struggles the world never…
What’s In Store For The First Woman President
Apr 11 • 48 min
Jennifer Palmieri served as Hillary Clinton’s communications director during her presidential run. She joins us to talk about what she learned from working on an unsuccessful campaign – and about what future female politicians can take away from her…
It’s Donald Trump’s Party Now
Apr 10 • 47 min
When Donald Trump won the presidency, many Republicans were relieved after eight years of Democratic rule. During the first year of his presidency, though, Trump has charted a new path for the GOP – one that has some conservatives questioning the future…
Recruiting Teachers Who Look Like America
Apr 9 • 48 min
Texas schools have one of nation’s largest diversity gaps – meaning students of color are rarely taught by teachers who look like them. Michael Hansen, director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution, joins us to talk about…
The Story Of The ‘Siamese Twins’
Apr 9 • 48 min
In 1829, Chang and Eng Bunker arrived in Boston and were an immediate sensation, as most people had never encountered a set of conjoined twins. University of California English professor Yunte Huang joins us to tell the Bunkers’ story – how they won their…
Lidia Bastianich’s Life In Food
Apr 6 • 48 min
Lidia Matticchio Bastianich has taught millions of people the basics of Italian cooking on her PBS television show, “Lidia’s Kitchen.” She joins guest host Courtney Collins to talk about her journey from Italian farm girl to celebrity chef, which she…
How Power Has Changed
Apr 5 • 48 min
One of the most profound ways the internet has changed the world is as a tool for connecting like-minded people, allowing the many to seize power from the few. Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms join us to talk about how this concept has played out in…
Jorge Ramos Never Feels At Home
Apr 5 • 48 min
Jorge Ramos was born in Mexico City and moved to the United States in his early 20s. The Univision broadcaster has been critical of both President Obama and President Trump on immigration, and he joins us to talk about why even after 35 years of living…
Barbara P. Bush on Global Activism
Apr 4 • 48 min
Barbara Pierce Bush – along with her sister, Jenna – grew up surrounded by politics. First their grandfather became president, then their father was elected governor before moving into the White House himself. She joins us to talk about growing up in the…
The Branch Davidian Siege: 25 Years Later
Apr 4 • 48 min
Twenty-five years ago, cult leader David Koresh entered into a standoff with federal agents that ended in the deaths of 75 people, including his own. A new documentary features survivors and law enforcement officers who experienced the tragedy, and…
How Urban Wildlife Is Evolving
Apr 3 • 48 min
For centuries, humans have altered animal habitats, turning wild spaces into concrete cities. Urban ecologist Menno Schilthuizen joins us to talk about how lizards, birds and other creatures are adapting to better live alongside us. His new book is called…
Colson Whitehead On ‘The Underground Railroad’
Apr 3 • 48 min
In “The Underground Railroad,” two slaves escape their Georgia plantation and navigate the country along the secret network. The novel earned Colson Whitehead a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, and he joins us to talk about how he wove the…
Anna Quindlen’s ‘Alternate Side’
Apr 2 • 48 min
In Anna Quindlen’s new novel, “Alternate Side,” life in a quiet New York City neighborhood is upended when the residents squabble over use of the street’s small parking lot. Quindlen joins us to talk about how something so small can divide people – and…
Elizabeth Smart On Happily Ever After
Apr 2 • 48 min
As a 14-year-old, Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped in the middle of the night and kept in chains for nine months. In the 15 years since being reunited with her family, Smart has focused her life on helping others recover from traumatic events. She joins us…
The Life Of An Astronaut
Mar 30 • 48 min
Most of us have looked up at the sky and wondered what it would be like to float through space. And a select few have actually experienced it. This hour, we’ll talk to astronauts Terry Virts, Scott Kelly and Buzz Aldrin about life in zero gravity, making…
Inside The Partition Of India And Pakistan
Mar 29 • 48 min
In 1947, 12-year-old Nisha finds herself divided between her Hindu and Muslim heritages just as her home country of India is also being split in two. Nisha is the protagonist of Veera Hiranandani’s novel “The Night Diary,” and Hiranandani joins us to talk…
What Is Pope Francis Trying To Do?
Mar 29 • 48 min
Five years ago, Jorge Mario Bergoglio took over as leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics when he was elected to the papacy. For many, he’s been a breath of fresh air – but to some conservative members of the faith, he’s pushed for unwelcome changes.…
Fighting Cancer From Within
Mar 28 • 48 min
Many cancer patients endure surgeries, months of chemotherapy or both. Science journalist Robin Marantz Henig joins us to talk about a promising new option – immunotherapy – which taps into the immune system’s T-cell supply to fight diseases. Henig’s…
Breaking Into The TV Boys’ Club
Mar 28 • 48 min
If you’ve ever watched “The Simpsons,” “Late Night with David Letterman” or even “The Muppets,” you’re familiar with Nell Scovell’s sense of humor. The writer and director behind these and many, many other television shows joins us to talk about how she…
From Us And Them To We
Mar 27 • 48 min
A trait humans share with other creatures is a natural inclination to divide. What separates us from them, though, is our ability to see past that trait to bridge our differences. David Berreby joins us to talk about how scientists are studying the way…
Evolution’s Next Step: A.I.
Mar 27 • 48 min
Researchers around the world are racing to create the ultimate algorithm – one capable of teaching itself all there is to know. University of Washington computer scientist Pedro Domingos joins us to talk about how this eventual discovery would change the…
The Odd Couple: Timothy Leary and Richard Nixon
Mar 26 • 48 min
When Timothy Leary escaped from prison, it set off a manhunt fueled by President Nixon’s obsession with catching the leading voice of America’s counterculture. Bill Minutaglio joins us to talk about what the rivalry between the two men says about the…
Preventing (Instead Of Reacting To) Pandemics
Mar 26 • 48 min
As the founder of the nonprofit health care organization Partners in Health, Paul Farmer has helped to bring medical care to some of the most impoverished places on Earth. He joins us to talk about the places that need our attention most – and about what…
Cheer Up! Why It’s A Great Time To Be Alive
Mar 23 • 48 min
Climate change, famine and war threaten humanity each day. And yet we’ve never been better equipped to take on these issues than we are right now. Gregg Easterbrook joins us to make the case that things aren’t as bad as they seem, which he writes about in…
Sorting The Refugees From The Opportunists
Mar 22 • 48 min
Europe is still trying to figure out how to accommodate the wave of migrants seeking another life there. Among the issues is: How can a nation separate the true refugees from the economic opportunists? Graeme Wood joins us to talk about a sophisticated…
The Dangers Of Consensus And Compromise
Mar 22 • 48 min
At the office, it’s often easiest to just go with the flow. Psychologist Charlan Nemeth joins us to talk about why consensus is the killer of innovation. She writes about the idea in “In Defense of Troublemakers: The Power of Dissent in Life and Business”…
The Cutting Edge Of Alzheimer’s Research
Mar 21 • 48 min
The medical community is constantly refining its approach to how we care for people suffering from dementia. Heather Snyder, senior director for medical and scientific relations with the Alzheimer’s Association, joins us to talk about the latest trends in…
When You’re The Only One
Mar 21 • 48 min
When you look around the room and no one else looks like you, talks like you or even thinks like you, it can be isolating. We devote this hour to those people who feel like they’re the only one – from a blackwoman hiker sharingthe trails with…
Learning To Wage Peace
Mar 20 • 48 min
Paul Chappell graduated from West Point and served in the Iraq War. And today, he’s one of America’s foremost voices for peace. He joins us to talk about nonviolent tools available to solve conflict in the world.
The Feds Are Braced For Revolution
Mar 20 • 48 min
In the last decade, we’ve seen increasingly militarized police departments, invasive surveillance by the NSA and highly sophisticated propaganda. Columbia law professor Bernard E. Harcourt has followed these trends, and he joins us to talk about how these…
LBJs Political Implosion
Mar 19 • 48 min
In the later years of Lyndon Johnson’s administration, the president’s attention was divided between the unwinnable Vietnam War and civil unrest at home. These turbulent years are captured in Robert Schenkkan’s play “The Great Society” – his follow up to…
Is The Endangered Species List Too Long?
Mar 19 • 48 min
The Endangered Species Act requires that we try to help all species threatened with extinction. Critics argue, though, that resources would be better spent helping the creatures that contribute most to their ecosystems. Jennifer Kahn joins us to talk…
Learning To Leave: A Woman’s Journey
Mar 16 • 48 min
Tara Westover grew up in a family of survivalists, living way off the grid and learning only what her family taught her. She joins us to tell the story of how she finally learned of the outside world – and how that knowledge led her to Harvard, Cambridge…
Things May Not Be As Bad As You Think
Mar 15 • 48 min
Turn on the news and you’re bombarded with plenty of reasons to think humanity is a lost cause. Not so, says Steven Pinker! The Harvard psychology professor joins us to talk about how we’re actually living in an age of unprecedented safety, peace and…
Texas’ Mass Mexican Deportation
Mar 15 • 48 min
During the Great Depression, there was a push to preserve jobs for white Americans by deporting Mexicans – and in some cases, Mexican-Americans. TCU assistant professor Melita M. Garza joins us to talk about how this story was covered in the media and how…
From Martha To Melania: A History Of First Ladies
Mar 14 • 48 min
First ladies of the United States have no formal power – and yet many are among the most influential people in American history. A new exhibition at the George W. Bush Presidential Center tells the stories of each first lady – from Martha Washington to…
A Celebration Of Procrastination
Mar 14 • 48 min
The next time you blow a deadline, remind yourself: Some of history’s greatest minds were lousy when it came to being on time. Andrew Santella joins us to talk about why punctuality is an overblown character trait, which he writes about in “Soon: An…
Fishing For A New Way Of Life
Mar 13 • 48 min
People living along the coast of Senegal have relied on the ocean both for food and their livelihood. In recent years, though, the fish that were once plentiful have disappeared. Anna Badkhen visited these fishing villages to find out how people are…
Scrolling For Happiness
Mar 13 • 48 min
We all feel a little boost when someone likes our Instagram photo or retweets us. And when our witty Facebook post is met with silence, it’s easy to wonder where we went wrong. Washington University in St. Louis psychologist Tim Bono joins us to talk…
The Landscape Of Black America
Mar 12 • 48 min
Following Emancipation, African-Americans created communities across the country in which black culture thrives. UCLA sociologist Marcus Anthony Hunter joins us to talk about what these communities have in common – and about the many functions they serve.…
Portraits Of Opioid Addiction
Mar 12 • 48 min
About 64,000 people die each year after overdosing on drugs. Many of those deaths can be traced to opioids, and the issue has grabbed the attention of both the medical community and the federal government. Time Magazine spent a year documenting the…
Hooked: Understanding Addiction
Mar 9 • 48 min
Addiction is a part of life that affects nearly every family. This hour, we explore the topic with a formerheroin addict, a historian who writes aboutAmerica’s relationship with alcoholand a neuroscientist who studies thebrains of addicts.
The Evolutionary Quest For Equilibrium
Mar 8 • 48 min
Human beings have a natural desire for what’s known as “homeostasis” – basically, we long for stability and equilibrium. Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio has studied this innate drive, and he joins us to talk about how it connects us to even the earliest…
The Challenges Of Fixing Immigration
Mar 8 • 48 min
When it comes to immigration reform, at the heart of the debate is: How do we decide who to let in, and how do we protect ourselves from those we want to keep out? James F. Hollifield, director of the John Goodwin Tower Center at SMU, joins us to walk…
The Upside Of Forgetting
Mar 7 • 48 min
As a palliative care nurse, Sallie Tisdale has seen the devastation caused by dementia up close. And she’s also seen moments of grace that accompany a person’s rediscovery of things they once knew. She joins us to talk about how we might take a more…
A Guide To Repairing Sorrow
Mar 7 • 48 min
A broken heart may not be an actual physical malady, but that doesn’t make it any less real. And yet for most of us, the only medicine available is time. Psychologist Guy Winch joins us to talk about practical steps to getting over everything from a…
A Conversation With Maria Shriver
Mar 6 • 48 min
Maria Shriver has worn many hats in her life – journalist, activist, First Lady of California, niece of a president and mother of four. She joins us to talk about what these various roles have taught her about making the most of life. Her new book is…
The Science Of Planning Your Life
Mar 6 • 48 min
Deciding when to do something – whether it’s starting a job, ending a relationship or just scheduling a vacation – can be tough since we have to make these choices without knowing what’s to come. Daniel Pink has studied how we can use data to better plan…
Robert Siegel On Four Decades At NPR
Mar 5 • 48 min
As an anchor of “All Things Considered,” Robert Siegel updated millions of Americans on the day’s news as they made their way home from work. Siegel retired in January, and he joins us to talk about how he helped to elevate NPR from a fledgling network…
What Makes Innovators Tick
Mar 5 • 48 min
True innovators throughout history – from Edison to Einstein – possessed innate character traits that separated them from even run-of-the-mill geniuses. That’s according to NYU business professor Melissa A. Schilling, who joins guest host Courtney Collins…
A Conversation With St. Vincent
Mar 2 • 48 min
For more than a decade, Annie Clark has been one of the darlings of the indie rock universe – from playing with the Polyphonic Spree and touring with Sufjan Stevens to releasing her own material as St. Vincent. The Dallas native joins us to talk about her…
Consequences of Tribalism in America
Mar 1 • 48 min
In America, we’re good at dividing ourselves into groups based on race, religion and ideology. Yale Law professor Amy Chua joins us to talk about how our tribalism influences the ways in which we interact with the rest of the world – and about how we…