The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/tnyradiohour
David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the mag


The Future of Trumpism
Oct 23 • 27 min
Nicholas Lemann’s “The Republican Identity Crisis After Trump” explores what will happen to the movement Donald Trump created among Republicans. In his 2016 campaign, he ran as a populist insurgent against Wall Street, “élites,” and the Republican Party…
Elvis Costello Talks with David Remnick
Oct 20 • 18 min
Elvis Costello’s thirty-first studio album, “Hey Clockface,” will be released this month. Recorded largely before the pandemic, it features an unusual combination of winds, cello, piano, and drums. David Remnick talks with Costello about the influence of…
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elizabeth Warren on the State of Our Democracy
Oct 16 • 32 min
At the 2020 New Yorker Festival, earlier this month, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Elizabeth Warren joined Andrew Marantz to talk about the Presidential race, and how Joe Biden should lead if he wins the election. Plus, Dexter…
The Battle Over Portland
Oct 13 • 24 min
During the Presidential debate in September, Donald Trump was asked to denounce the white supremacists who were battling anti-racism protesters in Portland; instead, he blamed leftists for the violence and told the Proud Boys to “stand by.” The Pacific…
Anthony Fauci Then and Now, and the Writer-Director Radha Blank
Oct 9 • 25 min
At the moment that Donald Trump was leaving Walter Reed Hospital, not yet recovered from a case of COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci sat down with Michael Specter to discuss the coronavirus and its impact on America. For the President—and all of us counting on…
Marilynne Robinson on Faith, Love, and Politics
Oct 6 • 19 min
Marilynne Robinson’s new novel, “Jack,” is the fourth to be set among the world and people of a fictional town called Gilead, Iowa. The novelist grew up in Idaho, and, when she moved to the flatter country of Iowa, she “noticed that the landscape had a…
The Election, as Seen from Swing States
Oct 2 • 30 min
Joe Biden leads the Presidential race in Pennsylvania by around ten per cent, according to most polls, but Eliza Griswold says you wouldn’t know it on the ground. Republicans in the state have organized a huge registration drive in recent years, and,…
Keith Knight of “Woke,” and Jia Tolentino Picks Three
Sep 29 • 22 min
“Woke,” a new comedy on Hulu, is inspired by the life of its creator, Keith Knight. The show, which blends reality and animated fantasy, follows Keef, a Black cartoonist who is on the cusp of mainstream success when an ugly incident with the police…
Can a Newcomer Unseat Lindsey Graham? Plus, Carlos Lozada on “What Were We Thinking”
Sep 25 • 27 min
Jaime Harrison may seem like a long shot to become a South Carolina senator: he is a Black Democrat who grew up on food stamps in public housing, and he has never held elected public office. But a Quinnipiac poll ties him with Lindsay Graham—each has the…
Miranda July’s Uncomfortable Comedies, and a Toast to Roger Angell
Sep 22 • 30 min
Miranda July’s third feature film is “Kajillionaire,” a heist movie centered on a dysfunctional family, and her first with a Hollywood star like Evan Rachel Wood. Like most of her work, it can be classified as a comedy, but just barely. “There’s some kind…
An Election in Peril
Sep 18 • 19 min
This Presidential race is a battle for the soul and the future of the country—on this much, both parties agree—and yet the pitfalls in the election process itself are vast. David Remnick runs through some of the risks to your vote with a group of staff…
The Composer Richard Wagner and the Birth of the Movies
Sep 15 • 16 min
The German composer Richard Wagner had an enormous influence not only on modern music but on artists of all stripes, and on political culture as well. His use of folkloric material to create modern epics won him the admiration of thinkers like W. E. B. Du…
What to Do with a Confederate Monument?
Sep 11 • 33 min
Across the South and well beyond, cities and states have been removing their Confederate monuments, recognizing their power as symbols of America’s foundational racism. In the town of Easton, Maryland, in front of the picturesque courthouse, there’s a…
N. K. Jemisin on H. P. Lovecraft, and Jill Lepore on the End of a Pandemic
Sep 8 • 27 min
N. K. Jemisin has faced down a racist backlash to her success in the science-fiction community. But white supremacy in the genre is nothing new, she tells Raffi Khatchadourian. Her recent novel “The City We Became” explicitly addresses the legacy of the…
Bette Midler and the Screenwriter Paul Rudnick on “Coastal Elites”
Sep 4 • 22 min
This segment contains adult language. In the new film “Coastal Elites,” Bette Midler plays a New Yorker of a certain type: a retired teacher who lives on the Upper West Side, reads the New York Times with Talmudic attention, and is driven more than half…
Rick Perlstein on Goldwater, Reagan, and Trump
Aug 28 • 20 min
“Reaganland” is the new volume in Rick Perlstein’s long chronicle of the American conservative movement; the four books, which he began publishing in 2001, run some 3,000 pages in total. While the author is left of center politically, the series has been…
Everyone Knew Who Shot Ahmaud Arbery. Why Did the Killers Walk Free?
Aug 25 • 27 min
It has been six months since Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man, was shot by three white men while he was out for a Sunday jog near his childhood home. The video of the killing, taken by one of the men who participated in it, could be said to have kindled…
Will This Be Joe Biden’s F.D.R. Moment?
Aug 23 • 32 min
Joe Biden has been playing it safe during the coronavirus pandemic, but Evan Osnos got the chance to sit down with the nominee in person. It was too hot to sit outside, but the campaign staff didn’t want an outsider in Biden’s home, so the interview took…
Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross on HBO’s “Watchmen”
Aug 21 • 21 min
HBO’s “Watchmen” was nominated for twenty-six Emmy Awards—more than any other show this year—including two for the music by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross (who are also the members of the industrial-rock band Nine Inch Nails). The music negotiates the…
Sarah Paulson, the Star of Netflix’s “Ratched”
Aug 18 • 10 min
The actor Sarah Paulson has appeared in “12 Years a Slave,” “The People v. O. J. Simpson,” and eight seasons of Ryan Murphy’s “American Horror Story.” Now she’s starring in a new Murphy production—the series “Ratched,” which premieres on Netflix next…
Samantha’s Journey into the Alt-Right, and Back
Aug 14 • 39 min
Since 2016, Andrew Marantz has been reporting on how the extremist right has harnessed the Internet and social media to gain a startling prominence in American politics. One day, he was contacted by a woman named Samantha, who was in the leadership of the…
Isabel Wilkerson on America’s Caste System
Aug 11 • 33 min
In this moment of historical reckoning, many Americans are being introduced to concepts like intersectionality, white fragility, and anti-racism. But Isabel Wilkerson would like to incorporate a little-discussed concept into our national conversation:…
The Documentary ICE Doesn’t Want You to See
Aug 7 • 16 min
Immigrations and Customs Enforcement has been given a broad mandate to round up undocumented immigrants. The agency is infamously unwelcoming to journalists, but two filmmakers managed to get unprecedented access to its employees and detention facilities.…
Isabel Wilkerson on America’s Caste System
Aug 7 • 14 min
In this moment of historical reckoning, many Americans are being introduced to concepts like intersectionality, white fragility, and anti-racism. Isabel Wilkerson, the author of the best-selling book “The Warmth of Other Suns,” is introducing a…
Jeffrey Toobin Explores Donald Trump’s “True Crimes and Misdemeanors”
Aug 4 • 14 min
The Mueller Report documented enough crimes and scandals in Donald Trump’s Presidential campaign and in his Administration to sink the career of any President before him. But Trump called the whole thing a win. What’s more, he is now running for…
Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Violence in Chicago, and William Finnegan on the Power of Police Unions
Jul 31 • 35 min
Before she became the mayor of Chicago, last year, Lori Lightfoot spent nearly a decade working on police reform. Now Lightfoot is facing civil unrest over police brutality and criticism by the President for the homicide and shooting rates in her city.…
Black Italians Fight to Be Italian
Jul 28 • 30 min
In the United States, most of us take it for granted that every person born on American soil is granted citizenship; it’s been the law since 1868, with the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment. But birthright citizenship is more the exception than the rule…
Emily Oster on Whether and How to Reopen Schools
Jul 24 • 16 min
The decision about whether to reopen schools may determine children’s futures, the survival of teachers, and the economy’s ability to rebound. Emily Oster, an economist at Brown University, reviews what we do and don’t know about the dangers of in-person…
Podcast Extra: André Holland on Shakespeare’s “Richard II”
Jul 23 • 17 min
This summer, the Public Theatre, in New York, is putting on Shakespeare’s history play “Richard II.” Because most theatre was cancelled, even outdoors, due to the pandemic, the Public partnered with WNYC to bring the show to the radio. The production…
The Perils Prison Reform, and the Vision of a Visually Impaired Artist
Jul 21 • 28 min
In the past few years, there has been a growing bipartisan demand to reduce the extraordinarily high rate of incarceration in the United States, on both moral and fiscal grounds. But some of the key reforms, according to some prison abolitionists, are…
Chance the Rapper’s Art and Activism
Jul 17 • 22 min
My generation was taught that the civil-rights movement ended in the sixties, and that the Civil Rights Act put things as they should be,” Chance the Rapper tells David Remnick. “That belief was reinforced with the election of Barack Obama”—who loomed…
Michaela Coel on Making “I May Destroy You”
Jul 14 • 20 min
The protagonist of “I May Destroy You,” a young woman named Arabella, has her drink spiked at a party and discovers afterward that she has been assaulted. She spends the rest of the show untangling what happened to her. And yet the HBO series is not a…
The State of the Biden Campaign
Jul 10 • 30 min
Joe Biden all but locked up the Democratic Presidential nomination just as the coronavirius crisis began triggering national lockdowns. Now he faces an economic disaster and a public-health emergency that prevent traditional campaigning, which may help…
Laura Marling, a Briton in Los Angeles
Jul 7 • 15 min
The thirty-year-old British singer/songwriter Laura Marling has produced seven albums of dense but delicate folk music, starting when she was only eighteen. After several years touring on the road, she tells John Seabrook, she found herself in Los…
Hasan Minhaj and Kenan Thompson
Jul 3 • 34 min
The 2019 New Yorker Festival was the twentieth edition of the annual event, and it was particularly star-studded. This program features interviews with Kenan Thompson, the longest-running cast member of “Saturday Night Live,” and Hasan Minhaj, the “Daily…
Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane
Jun 30 • 29 min
Starting this spring, many states began releasing some inmates from prisons and jails to try to reduce the spread of COVID-19. But a huge number of incarcerated people are mentally ill or addicted to drugs, or sometimes both. When those people are…
Hilton Als’s Homecoming and the March for Queer Liberation
Jun 26 • 19 min
In the summer of 1967, a young black boy in Brooklyn was shot in the back by a police officer. The writer Hilton Als recalls the two days of “discord and sadness” that followed, and reflects on the connection between those demonstrations and this summer’s…
Live at Home Part II: Phoebe Bridgers
Jun 23 • 31 min
Phoebe Bridgers’s tour dates were cancelled—she was booked at Madison Square Garden, among other venues—so she performs songs from her recent album, “Punisher,” from home. The critic Amanda Petrusich talks about the joys of Folkways records, and the…
Live at Home Part I: John Legend
Jun 19 • 16 min
Like everyone in the United States, John Legend has spent much of the past three months in lockdown. He has been recording new music (via Zoom), performing on Instagram, and promoting his upcoming album. Though many artists have delayed releasing records…
The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA
Jun 16 • 19 min
This month, the Supreme Court is expected to decide a case with enormous repercussions: the Trump Administration’s cancellation of DACA, a policy that protects young immigrants commonly known as Dreamers. In November, Jonathan Blitzer spoke with two…
Getting White People to Talk About Racism
Jun 12 • 30 min
George Floyd’s killing has prompted a national outcry and a wide reassessment of the ways in which racist systems are intrinsic to America. The anti-racism trainer Suzanne Plihcik argues that racism occurs even in the absence of people who seem like…
Josephine Decker’s “Shirley”
Jun 9 • 11 min
The film critic Richard Brody regards Josephine Decker as one of the best directors of her generation, and picked her 2018 film “Madeline’s Madeline” as his favorite of the year. Decker, he says, reinvents “the very stuff of movies—image, sound,…
Can Police Violence Be Curbed?
Jun 5 • 37 min
“To look around the United States today is enough to make prophets and angels weep,” James Baldwin wrote, in 1978. This week, the staff writer Jelani Cobb speaks with a Minneapolis activist who’s been calling to defund the city’s police department, and…
Mark Cuban Wants to Save Capitalism from Itself
Jun 2 • 29 min
Mark Cuban identifies as a capitalist, but the billionaire investor, “Shark Tank” star, and Dallas Mavericks owner has been advocating for changes that point to a different kind of politics. Cuban tells Sheelah Kolhatkar that the economic crisis now…
Life After Lockdown, and the Politics of Blaming China
May 29 • 21 min
Since January, Peter Hessler has reported from China under quarantine. Now, as restrictions lift, he tells David Remnick about his return to normal life; recently, he even went to a dance club. But, although China’s stringent containment measures were…
Reading “The Plague” During a Plague, and Memorial Day by the Pool
May 25 • 21 min
When schools were closed owing to the coronavirus outbreak, the English teacher Petria May did the most natural thing she could think of: she assigned her tenth-grade class to read Albert Camus’s novel “The Plague,” which describes a quarantine during an…
Larissa MacFarquhar on a Potentially Deadly Experiment, and Jelani Cobb on the Killing of Ahmaud Arbery
May 22 • 28 min
Abie Roehrig, a twenty-year-old undergraduate, has put his name on a list of volunteers for a human-challenge trial to test the efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine. A human-challenge trial for a vaccine would be nearly unprecedented: it would entail giving…
Perfume Genius Talks with Jia Tolentino, and Anthony Lane Examines Outbreaks in the Movies
May 19 • 23 min
The New Yorker’s Jia Tolentino has been following the artist Mike Hadreas, who records as Perfume Genius, since his first album; he has just released his fifth, “Set My Heart on Fire Immediately.” He sings about his life and his sexuality in a style that…
Jill Lepore on How a Pandemic Ends
May 15 • 27 min
Jill Lepore discusses the “stay at home” campaigns that ran on radio stations during the polio years, devised to keep children indoors; she is especially fond of a program that featured a young Hubert Humphrey reading comics. Lepore finds solace in…
The Pandemic and Little Haiti, Plus Thomas McGuane and Callan Wink Go Fishing
May 12 • 26 min
For more than fifteen years, the fiction writer Edwidge Danticat has called Miami’s Little Haiti home. The neighborhood is full of Haitian émigrés like herself, many of whom support families back home. Though the virus has barely touched Haiti, the…
Governor Gretchen Whitmer on COVID-19, Trump, and the Accusations Against Joe Biden
May 8 • 24 min
Michigan is the tenth-largest state by population, but it has the third-largest number of COVID-19 deaths. Governor Gretchen Whitmer enacted some of the country’s most stringent stay-at-home orders, even forbidding landscaping and fishing. Furious and…
The Pandemic Is Wreaking Havoc in America’s Prisons and Jails
May 5 • 22 min
Three months ago, Kai Wright, the host of WNYC’s the United States of Anxiety, joined David Remnick for a special episode about the effects of mass incarceration and the movement to end it. Now, as the coronavirus pandemic puts inmates in acute and…
The Economic Fallout of COVID-19; plus Mike Birbiglia, and Chika
May 1 • 28 min
As of the end of April, thirty million people have filed for unemployment as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Yet many believe that this is only the first stage or initial shock of the financial system’s abrupt halt. “It’s more like a heart attack…
Bonus Episode: Why COVID-19 Is Killing Black People
Apr 29 • 29 min
As black people die from COVID-19 at disproportionate rates, the disease is highlighting health disparities we’ve long known about. Kai Wright, the host of WNYC’s “The United States of Anxiety,” speaks with Arline Geronimus, a public-health researcher,…
A City at the Peak of Crisis
Apr 24 • 49 min
Experts predicted that Wednesday, April 15th would be a peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City, its epicenter. On that day, a crew of New Yorker writers talked with people all over the city, in every circumstance and walk of life, to form a…
Rachel Carson Dreams of the Sea
Apr 21 • 17 min
Before she published “Silent Spring,” one of the most influential books of the last century, Rachel Carson was a young aspiring poet and then a graduate student in marine biology. Although she couldn’t swim and disliked boats, Carson fell in love with the…
Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert on the Pandemic and the Environment
Apr 17 • 32 min
Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert join David Remnick to talk about the twin crises of our time: the coronavirus pandemic and the climate emergency. During the COVID-19 national emergency, the Trump Administration has loosened auto-emissions standards,…
War and Peace and Pandemic, and Roger Angell on Baseball Seasons Past
Apr 14 • 31 min
The contributor Yiyun Li is a fiction writer who also teaches creative writing at Princeton University. “The campus is empty,” she tells Joshua Rothman. “The city is quiet. It has a different feeling. And it’s a good time to read ‘War and Peace.’ ” When…
Amid a Pandemic, Catharsis at Seven O’Clock
Apr 10 • 18 min
David Remnick on the hope and catharsis that he finds in New York City’s daily mass cheer, which celebrates all those who are keeping the city alive at their peril. Plus, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on the inequality of COVID-19. On the surface, it may seem…
Exploitation in the Amazon
Apr 7 • 23 min
This week, Jair Bolsonaro, the President of Brazil, ignored the advice of his own health minister, and went for a walk in the capitol, declaring “We’ll all die one day.” Bolsonaro, a right-wing populist elected to the Presidency in 2018, is known for…
Why We Underestimated COVID-19, and DJ D-Nice’s Club Quarantine
Apr 3 • 26 min
Despite the warnings of politicians and health-care professionals, many have failed to treat the coronavirus pandemic as a serious threat: the spring breakers on beaches, the crowds in city parks. Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel Prize-winning expert on human…
Alcoholics Anonymous Goes Remote, and Jia Tolentino on Quarantine
Mar 31 • 16 min
An old Alcoholics Anonymous slogan goes, “Seven days without an A.A. meeting makes one weak.” But COVID-19 has made in-person meetings impossible in many situations, removing the foundation on which many alcoholics build their sobriety. Reagan Reed, the…
E.R. Doctors on the COVID-19 Crisis, and the Politics of a Pandemic
Mar 27 • 33 min
Across the country, doctors and nurses are being forced to care for an increasing number of COVID patients with dwindling supplies and no clear end to the outbreak in sight. Two emergency-room doctors, Jessica van Voorhees, in New York City, and Sana…
The Shock Wave of COVID-19
Mar 20 • 49 min
As the coronavirus pandemic brings the country to a standstill, David Remnick and New Yorker writers examine the scope of the damage—emotional, physical, and economic. Remnick speaks with a medical ethicist about the painful decisions that medical workers…
Astrid Holleeder’s Crime Family
Mar 17 • 29 min
All her life, Astrid Holleeder knew that her older brother Willem was involved in crime; in their tough Amsterdam neighborhood, and as children of an abusive father, it wasn’t a shocking development. But she was stunned when, in 1983, Willem and his best…
Life Under Quarantine
Mar 13 • 19 min
Since its outbreak last year, the coronavirus COVID-19 has thrown the world into disarray. Travel to the U.S. from Europe has been suspended for thirty days; financial markets have plunged; Saudi Arabia cancelled the Hajj—the list of impacts is already…
William Gibson on the End of the Future, and a Visit with Thundercat
Mar 10 • 27 min
William Gibson has often been described as prescient in his ability to imagine the future. His special power, according to the staff writer Joshua Rothman, is actually his attunement to the present. In “Agency,” Gibson’s new novel, people in the future…
And Then There Were Two
Mar 6 • 22 min
Just over a week ago, Bernie Sanders seemed to be the front-runner for the Democratic nomination. Then came some prominent withdrawals from the race, and, on Super Tuesday, the resurgence of Joe Biden’s campaign. (Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii remains in the…
President Mike?
Mar 2 • 21 min
Eleanor Randolph finished her biography of Michael Bloomberg in June, 2019, just as the former mayor decided not to run for President. “He didn’t want to go on an apology tour,” Randolph tells David Remnick. Bloomberg knew he would be called to answer for…
Rose McGowan on Harvey Weinstein’s Guilty Verdict, and Neuroscience on the Campaign Trail
Feb 28 • 29 min
After a Manhattan jury found Harvey Weinstein guilty of two of the sex crimes he was charged with, Ronan Farrow sat down with the actress Rose McGowan, one of the women to speak out against the movie producer, whom she has said raped her in 1997, at a…
Rolling the Dice with Russia, and a Conversation with Pam Grier
Feb 21 • 25 min
The complexity of world events can’t be modelled by a flow chart or even the most sophisticated algorithms. Instead, military officers, diplomats, and policy analysts sometimes turn to an old but sophisticated set of tools: war games. Simon Parkin…
Stephen Miller, the Architect of Trump’s Immigration Plan
Feb 21 • 25 min
Donald Trump began his Presidential bid, in 2015, with an infamous speech, at Trump Tower, in which he said of Mexican immigrants, “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.” But it was not until a former aide to Jeff Sessions…
Gish Jen’s “The Resisters”
Feb 14 • 12 min
In the near future, the Internet is sentient and her name is Aunt Nettie. Gish Jen’s novel “The Resisters” imagines a dystopian world with two classes: the “netted” (people who work) and the “surplus” (people who merely consume). The book follows Gwen, a…
Bernie Sanders Ascends, and a High School Simulates the Election
Feb 14 • 38 min
Bernie Sanders’s win in New Hampshire has established him as the Democratic Presidential front-runner. Centrist Democrats regard him not as a challenge but more like an existential threat: they assume that only a moderate—and certainly not a democratic…
Louis C.K.’s Return to the Stage
Feb 7 • 25 min
Louis C.K. is touring comedy clubs for the first time since accusations of sexual misconduct seemed to end his career, in 2017. Several women charged that C.K. had exposed himself and masturbated in front of them. (Louis says that he believed he had their…
The Black Vote in 2020
Feb 7 • 24 min
The last time a Democrat won the White House, he had enormous support from black voters; lower support from black voters was one of many reasons Hillary Clinton lost in 2016. Marcus Ferrell, a political organizer from Atlanta, tells Radio Hour about the…
N. K. Jemisin on H. P. Lovecraft
Jan 31 • 15 min
N. K. Jemisin is one of the most celebrated authors in science fiction’s history; the novels of her “Broken Earth” trilogy won the Hugo Award for three consecutive years, a unique achievement. Yet her work has also engendered an ugly backlash from a…
A Tumultuous Week in Impeachment, and Jill Lepore on Democracy in Peril
Jan 31 • 34 min
The Washington correspondent Susan Glasser has been covering the scene in the Capitol as Republicans rush to contain the damage of the John Bolton manuscript leak. Senator Chris Coons, Democrat of Delaware, told Glasser that “if a Republican makes the…
An Alternative Oscars Ceremony, and Ezra Klein on Why We’re Polarized
Jan 24 • 28 min
It’s time for the most anticipated of all awards shows: the Brodys, in which The New Yorker’s Richard Brody shares the best films of the year, according to Richard Brody. And the political commentator Ezra Klein explains why he thinks politics have gotten…
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?
Jan 24 • 22 min
Mass incarceration is now widely regarded as a prejudiced and deeply harmful set of policies. Bipartisan support exists for some degree of criminal-justice reform, and, in some circles, the idea of prison abolition is also gaining traction. Kai Wright,…
Mass Incarceration, Then and Now
Jan 17 • 49 min
The U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration in the world; although the country makes up about five per cent of the global population, it holds nearly a quarter of the world’s prisoners. David Remnick is joined by WNYC’s Kai Wright, the host of the…
The Democratic Candidates Respond to the Conflict with Iran
Jan 10 • 31 min
Next week’s debate, in Des Moines, was likely going to focus on health care and other domestic issues, but the agenda will probably be dominated by the Trump Administration’s killing of Iran’s General Qassem Suleimani and America’s history of war in the…
Terry Gross Talks with David Remnick
Jan 3 • 25 min
David Remnick has appeared as the guest of Terry Gross on “Fresh Air” a number of times over the years, talking about Russia, Muhammad Ali, and other subjects. Hosting “Fresh Air” for nearly forty-five years, Gross is a defining voice of NPR, and is…
Dexter Filkins on the Air Strike that Killed Qassem Suleimani
Jan 3 • 18 min
Qassem Suleimani was Iran’s most powerful military and intelligence leader, and his killing, in a U.S. air strike in Baghdad on Thursday night, will likely be taken as an act of war by Tehran. Dexter Filkins, who wrote the definitive profile of Suleimani,…
Kelly Slater’s Perfect Wave Brings Surfing to a Crossroads
Dec 27, 2019 • 23 min
In December of 2015, a video appeared on the Internet that stunned surfers worldwide. Titled “Kelly’s Wave,” it showed Kelly Slater—arguably the best pro surfer in history—unveiling a secret project he had been working on for more than a decade. With the…
Patty Marx Conducts an Orchestra
Dec 27, 2019 • 23 min
Patricia Marx is a staff writer at The New Yorker, and has contributed pieces for thirty years. Still, it might not be too late to try out a new career. “There are some jobs and endeavors that look impossibly hard,” she notes. “But conducting [an…
The Hyperpartisan State
Dec 20, 2019 • 27 min
North Carolina is a relatively purple state, where voting between the two major parties tends to be close. That might suggest a place of common ground and compromise, but it’s quite the opposite. “A couple of years before the rest of the country got…
Peter Dinklage on Cyrano, and Life After “Thrones”
Dec 20, 2019 • 21 min
In the classic play “Cyrano de Bergerac,” a romantic with an exceptionally large and ugly nose pines after an unattainable woman. “As a person who looks like me, whenever I would watch a version of ‘Cyrano,’ I would just think, ‘That’s an actor in a fake…
Helen Rosner Takes the Office-Fridge Challenge
Dec 17, 2019 • 13 min
Helen Rosner is known for her high degree of resourcefulness in the kitchen: she once broke the Internet with an article about the ingenious use of a hair dryer to help roast a chicken. So the staff of Radio Hour threw down a challenge: we asked Helen to…
Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”
Dec 16, 2019 • 20 min
Lena Waithe is the screenwriter and creator of the Showtime series “The Chi,” about the South Side of Chicago, but she tells Jelani Cobb, “Getting your own TV show is like getting beaten to death by your own dream.” Her first script for a feature film is…
Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women,” and Damon Lindelof’s “Watchmen”
Dec 13, 2019 • 49 min
Greta Gerwig tells David Remnick that her adaptation of the novel “Little Women” didn’t need much updating for 2019: the world hasn’t changed as much as we might think, she says. Isaac Chotiner talks with Jack Goldsmith, the conservative legal scholar…
A Worldwide #MeToo Protest that Began in Chile
Dec 12, 2019 • 8 min
Three weeks ago, members of a Chilean feminist collective called Las Tesis put on blindfolds and party dresses and took to the streets. The festive atmosphere put their purpose in stark relief: the song they sang was “Un Violador En Tu Camino” (“A Rapist…
The March Toward Impeachment
Dec 10, 2019 • 8 min
It’s been a busy week, and it’s only Tuesday. The chair of the House Judiciary Committee unveiled two articles of impeachment against the President, which are nearly certain to be adopted by the House of Representatives. The same day, Congressional…
How Channel One Keeps the News Safe for Putin
Dec 9, 2019 • 13 min
Joshua Yaffa recently profiled a Russian media mogul named Konstantin Ernst. Ernst is the C.E.O. of Russia’s largest state-controlled media network, Channel One, and his personal evolution from idealistic independent journalist to cynical mogul is a…
Jamie Lee Curtis, the Original Scream Queen
Dec 6, 2019 • 33 min
Jamie Lee Curtis comes from Hollywood royalty as the daughter of Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis. She credits her mother’s role in “Psycho” for helping her land her first feature role, as the lead in “Halloween,” in 1978. “I’m never going to pretend I got…
This Is William Cohen’s Third Impeachment
Dec 5, 2019 • 19 min
The current impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump are only the fourth in American history, and William Cohen has been near the center of power for three of them. First, he was a Republican member of the House Judiciary Committee in 1974, when his…
Kamala Harris’s Campaign Ends in a Fizzle
Dec 4, 2019 • 22 min
Senator Kamala Harris had a lot going for her campaign for the Democratic Presidential nomination: national name recognition, strong fund-raising, an association with Barack Obama, and a way of commanding the spotlight both on television and on Twitter.…
Robin Wright on the Eruption of Violence in Iran
Dec 3, 2019 • 15 min
In November, Iran announced new fuel rationing and price hikes, just at a time when U.S. sanctions are crippling the economy and especially the middle class. Protests broke out immediately, and the government responded by shutting down access to the…
Rana Ayyub on India’s Crackdown on Muslims
Dec 2, 2019 • 24 min
In August, India suspended the autonomy of the state of Kashmir, putting soldiers in its streets and banning foreign journalists from entering. Dexter Filkins, who was working on a story about Narendra Modi, would not be deterred from going. To evade the…
Bon Iver Live at The New Yorker Festival
Nov 29, 2019 • 28 min
In the winter of 2007, a songwriter by the name of Justin Vernon returned to the Wisconsin woods, not far from where he grew up. Just a few months later, he emerged with “For Emma, Forever Ago”—his first album produced under the name Bon Iver. Since then,…
Billy Porter Wears Many Hats
Nov 29, 2019 • 21 min
Billy Porter’s résumé is as impressive as it is difficult to categorize. His performance in the musical “Kinky Boots” won him a Tony Award and a Grammy, and, recently, he won an Emmy for his character on Ryan Murphy’s FX series “Pose.” Take any style…
Jenny Slate Gets Dressed
Nov 22, 2019 • 10 min
Jenny Slate is on tour for her new book “Little Weirds.” It comprises short, strange essays, many of which involve clothing and how we present ourselves to the world. While Slate was in New York, the fashion columnist Rachel Syme paid her a call at her…
Samantha’s Journey into the Alt-Right, and Back
Nov 22, 2019 • 39 min
Since 2016, Andrew Marantz has been reporting on how the extremist right has harnessed the Internet and social media to gain a startling prominence in American politics. One day, he was contacted by a woman named Samantha, who was in the leadership of the…
Thomas Mallon on Impeachment, and Philip Pullman on “His Dark Materials”
Nov 15, 2019 • 29 min
As he opened public impeachment proceedings last week, Representative Adam Schiff invoked Watergate—which, after all, ended well for Democrats. To understand how that history applies, or doesn’t, to the current proceedings, The New Yorker’s Dorothy…
A Progressive Evangelical, and Charlamagne Tha God
Nov 12, 2019 • 27 min
Eliza Griswold spoke recently with Doug Pagitt, a pastor from Minneapolis who is a politically progressive evangelical Christian. Pagitt left his church to found an organization called Vote Common Good, which aims to move at least some religious voters…
The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA
Nov 8, 2019 • 22 min
Jeff Sessions, then the Attorney General, announced in 2017 the cancellation of the Obama-era policy known as DACA—Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. A number of plaintiffs sued, and their case goes to the Supreme Court next week. The New Yorker’s…
How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit
Nov 5, 2019 • 24 min
One of the almost unsolvable problems with the U.K.’s exit from the E.U. is that it would necessitate a “hard border” between Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., and the Republic of Ireland, which would remain a member nation in Europe. The…
Can Mayor Pete Be a Democratic Front-Runner?
Nov 1, 2019 • 25 min
Six months ago, David Remnick interviewed a politician named Pete Buttigieg, who was just beginning his campaign for the Democratic nomination for President. Buttigieg was an unlikely candidate: the youngest person to run in decades, he was a small-town…
Horror with a Real-Life Message
Oct 25, 2019 • 21 min
The director Sophia Takal is working on a remake of “Black Christmas,” an early slasher flick from Canada, in which sorority girls are picked off by a gruesome killer. Takal brought a very 2019 sensibility to the remake, reflecting on the ongoing struggle…
Roomful of Teeth Redefines Vocal Music for the Future
Oct 22, 2019 • 13 min
For a new music ensemble, Roomful of Teeth has made an extraordinary impression in a short time. Caroline Shaw, one of its vocalists, received the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for “Partita for 8 Voices,” which was written for the group. Then, in 2014, the vocal…
Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence
Oct 18, 2019 • 23 min
Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein and other accused perpetrators of sexual assault helped opened the floodgates of the #MeToo movement. In his new book, “Catch and Kill,” and in “The Black Cube Chronicles” published on newyorker.com, Farrow details…
Nancy Pelosi: “Timing Is Everything”
Oct 14, 2019 • 42 min
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has a lot of fights on her hands. After she led the Democrats to victory in the 2018 midterm elections, her legislative agenda hit a number of roadblocks, including the Republican-controlled Senate. But it is Pelosi’s…
New Yorker Writers on Hong Kong, and Nixon After Tiananmen Square
Oct 11, 2019 • 36 min
The months of protests in Hong Kong may be the biggest political crisis facing Chinese leadership since the Tiananmen Square massacre a generation ago. What began as objections to a proposed extradition law has morphed into a broad-based protest movement.…
Adam Gopnik on Aging, and a Visit to Maine with Elizabeth Strout
Oct 4, 2019 • 27 min
In fifteen years, people of retirement age will outnumber children for the first time in U.S. history. But, the staff writer Adam Gopnik finds, the elderly are poorly served by the field of design, whether it’s a screw-top plastic bottle or the…
New Yorker Reporters on Impeachment
Oct 4, 2019 • 22 min
David Remnick asks five New Yorker contributors about the nascent impeachment proceedings against the President. Susan Glasser, the magazine’s Washington correspondent, notes that Republicans have attacked the inquiry but have not exactly defended the…
Cory Booker on How to Defeat Donald Trump
Sep 27, 2019 • 44 min
Senator Cory Booker burst onto the national scene about a decade ago, after serving as the mayor of the notoriously impoverished and dangerous city of Newark, New Jersey. To get that job, Booker challenged an entrenched establishment. “My political…
The Green Rush
Sep 20, 2019 • 49 min
It was just seven years ago that Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Today the drug is legal in eleven states and counting, with polls showing that sixty per cent of Americans support its…
Brittany Howard, of Alabama Shakes, Talks with David Remnick
Sep 17, 2019 • 25 min
Alabama Shakes started out playing covers at local gigs but quickly found a unique personal voice rooted in rock and soul. The band came to national attention, found a wide and devoted public, and soon earned four Grammys, for the album “Sound and Color.”…
A Texas Republican Exits the House
Sep 13, 2019 • 25 min
An exodus is under way in the House of Representatives: not even halfway into the congressional term, fifteen Republicans have announced that they will not run in 2020. One of the exiting members is Will Hurd, a former C.I.A. officer who was elected in…
For a French Burglar, Stealing Masterpieces Is Easier Than Selling Them
Sep 10, 2019 • 20 min
Vjeran Tomic has been stealing since he was a small child, when he used a ladder to break into a library in his home town, in Bosnia. After moving to Paris, he graduated to lucrative apartment burglaries, living off the jewels he took and often doing time…
Salman Rushdie’s Fantastical American Quest Novel
Sep 6, 2019 • 30 min
The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman, talks with Salman Rushdie about “Quichotte,” his apocalyptic quest novel. A few years ago, when the four hundredth anniversary of “Don Quixote” was being celebrated, Rushdie reread Cervantes’s book and…
The New Norms of Affirmative Consent
Sep 3, 2019 • 30 min
Mischele Lewis learned that her fiancé was a con man and a convicted pedophile. By lying about who he was, did he violate her consent, and commit assault? Lewis’s story raises a larger question: What is consent, and how do we give it? It’s currently the…
Marianne Williamson Would Like to Clarify
Aug 30, 2019 • 16 min
Marianne Williamson, the self-help author associated with the New Age movement, has never held political office. But the race for the Presidency, she thinks, is less a battle of politics than a battle of souls. In her appearance in the July Democratic…
Jia Tolentino on the Rise and Fall of the Internet
Aug 27, 2019 • 29 min
Jia Tolentino writes for The New Yorker about an extremely wide range of topics, but a central concern is what it has meant to her to have grown up alongside the Internet. In her new, best-selling collection of essays, “Trick Mirror: Reflections on…
Roger Federer Opens Up
Aug 23, 2019 • 19 min
The winner of twenty Grand Slam titles and the top-ranked men’s player for three hundred and ten weeks, Roger Federer remains a dominant force in tennis. On the eve of playing in his nineteenth U.S. Open, Federer spoke with David Remnick about how he got…
Derren Brown’s Big Secret
Aug 20, 2019 • 29 min
Derren Brown wants you to know that he is not a magician. The term he prefers to use is “psychological illusionist,” and his acts mix psychology, misdirection, and showmanship. When he performs, he’s explicit about engaging with audiences’ minds and…
Maggie Gyllenhaal on “The Deuce” and #MeToo
Aug 16, 2019 • 20 min
Maggie Gyllenhaal’s first starring role was in the 2002 movie “Secretary,” a distriburbing romantic comedy about a troubled woman in a sadomasochistic relationship with her boss. Since then, Gyllenhaal has continued to push the boundaries of how sex is…
Ian Frazier Among the Drone Racers
Aug 13, 2019 • 17 min
Ian Frazier, who has chronicled American life for The New Yorker for more than forty years, travelled to a house in Fort Collins, Colorado, where three roommates build, fly, and race drones. Jordan Temkin, Zachry Thayer, and Travis McIntyre are three of…
The Rippling Effects of China’s One-Child Policy
Aug 9, 2019 • 14 min
Nanfu Wang grew up under China’s one-child policy and never questioned it. “You don’t know that it’s something initiated and implemented by the authority,” she tells The New Yorker’s Jiayang Fan. “It’s a normal part of everything. Just like water exists,…
Toni Morrison Talks with Hilton Als
Aug 6, 2019 • 48 min
Toni Morrison read The New York Times with pencil in hand. An editor by trade, Morrison never stopped noting errors in the paper. In 2015, during a conversation with The New Yorker’s Hilton Als, Morrison noted that the stories she cared about were once…
Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo, Part 2
Aug 6, 2019 • 17 min
In January, The New Yorker’s Ben Taub travelled to Mauritania to meet with Mohamedou Salahi. An electrical engineer who had lived in Germany, Salahi was detained at Guantánamo Bay for fifteen years and tortured, despite the fact that he was not a…
Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo
Aug 2, 2019 • 31 min
When Mohamedou Salahi arrived at the Guantánamo Bay detention camp, in August of 2002, he was hopeful. He knew why he had been detained: he had crossed paths with Al Qaeda operatives, and his cousin had once called him from Osama bin Laden’s phone. But…
Summer, By The Book
Jul 30, 2019 • 32 min
The cultural critic Doreen St. Félix goes to Madame Tussauds with Justin Kuritzkes, the début author of the novel “Famous People,” to talk about the nature of celebrity. Jia Tolentino heads for the children’s section of a bookstore with Rivka Galchen to…
Tana French on “The Witch Elm”
Jul 26, 2019 • 17 min
Tana French was an actor in her thirties when she sat down to write about a mystery that took the lives of two children, which became the global blockbuster “In the Woods.” With her subsequent books about the Dublin Murder Squad, French became known as…
Jelani Cobb Talks with the Artist Fahamu Pecou
Jul 23, 2019 • 16 min
Fahamu Pecou has shown work in museums all over the country and appeared on television shows like “Empire” and “black-ish.” The men the artist depicts tend to strike exaggerated poses, with sagging bluejeans and a cascade of colorful boxer shorts. Pecou…
Watching the Moon Landing
Jul 19, 2019 • 28 min
Some people have always believed that the moon landing was a government hoax, and, in the age of the Internet, that conspiracy theory continues to thrive. Andrew Marantz explores the value of skepticism, and the point at which disbelief leads to a…
Tom Hanks Reads His Tale of Going to the Moon
Jul 18, 2019 • 19 min
In 2014, Tom Hanks—the star of “Apollo 13,” among many other accomplishments—wrote a short story about going to the moon. But his was not a dramatic story of NASA heroes facing grave danger. Hanks told the tale of a very twenty-first century mission,…
Carly Rae Jepsen Talks with Amanda Petrusich
Jul 16, 2019 • 14 min
“I can remember, even four months after [“Call Me Maybe” ’s] release, being claimed in the press as a one-hit wonder,” Carly Rae Jepsen says. “Isn’t it too soon to decide that? Give me a chance!” The Canadian singer and songwriter was by no means a…
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on the 2020 Presidential Race and Why We Should Break up Homeland Security
Jul 9, 2019 • 57 min
It’s hard to recall a newly elected freshman representative to Congress who has made a bigger impact than Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Her primary victory for New York’s Fourteenth District seat—as a young woman of color beating out a long-established white…
Aaron Sorkin Rewrites “To Kill a Mockingbird”
Jul 9, 2019 • 27 min
As he set about adapting “To Kill a Mockingbird” for the stage, Aaron Sorkin found himself troubled by its protagonist, the small-town lawyer Atticus Finch. Harper Lee’s Finch, he thought, is tolerant to a fault—understanding rather than condemning the…
As Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith Hit the Road
Jul 5, 2019 • 19 min
Tracy K. Smith was named Poet Laureate, in 2017, right after the most divisive election of our time. She could have spent her two-year appointment writing and enjoying a nice office in the Library of Congress, but she felt poetry might be able to help…
Valeria Luiselli on Reënacting the Border
Jul 2, 2019 • 31 min
Valeria Luiselli first travelled to the U.S.–Mexico border in 2014, when the current immigration crisis began to heat up. Under the Trump Presidency, the border has become the dead center of American politics, and Luiselli returned with the radio producer…
Emily Nussbaum Likes to Watch
Jun 28, 2019 • 17 min
For decades, critical praise for a TV show was that it was “not like TV,” but more like a novel or a movie. That ingrained hierarchy always bugged Emily Nussbaum, who went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for her criticism in The New Yorker. She has been…
The Trump Administration’s Plan to Deport Victims of Human Trafficking
Jun 25, 2019 • 25 min
The New Yorker contributor Jenna Krajeski recently met with a woman who calls herself Esperanza. In her home country, Esperanza was coerced and threatened into prostitution, and later was trafficked into the United States, where she was subjected to…
Dexter Filkins on the Dangerous Escalations between the U.S. and Iran
Jun 21, 2019 • 20 min
After a U.S. drone was allegedly shot down by Iran last week, relations between Tehran and Washington are again approaching a low point; on Thursday, President Trump ordered and then called off an air strike. The situation has been deteriorating since the…
David Remnick Talks with Robert Caro about “Working”
Jun 18, 2019 • 30 min
Robert Caro is a historical biographer unlike anyone else writing today, with the Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards, and other honors to prove it. But to call his books biographies seems to miss the mark: they’re so rich in detail, so accurate, and at…
Will the Government Get Tough on Big Tech?
Jun 14, 2019 • 18 min
Apple, Amazon, Alphabet (which owns Google), and Facebook—known in the tech world as the Big Four—are among the largest and most profitable companies in the world, and they’ve been accustomed to the laxest of oversight from Washington. But the climate may…
From Stonewall to the Present, Fifty Years of L.G.B.T.Q. Rights
Jun 7, 2019 • 49 min
Masha Gessen co-hosts this episode of the New Yorker Radio Hour, guiding David Remnick through the fifty years of civil-rights gains for L.G.B.T.Q. people. From drag queens reading to children at the library to a popular gay Presidential candidate, we’ll…
Ava DuVernay on “When They See Us,” About the Boys Who Became the Central Park Five
Jun 4, 2019 • 28 min
Ava DuVernay doesn’t like using the term Central Park Five—a moniker created by the press in the aftermath of the notorious and brutal assault of a twenty-eight-year-old woman, Trisha Meili. “They’re not the Central Park Five,” she tells the New Yorker…
Emily Nussbaum on TV’s “Deluge” of #MeToo Plots
May 31, 2019 • 20 min
The #MeToo movement of recent years started in the entertainment industry, with revelations about moguls such as Harvey Weinstein and CBS’s Les Moonves, and, since 2017, television writers have been grappling with how to address sexual harassment for a…