The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/tnyradiohour
David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the mag


A Progressive Evangelical, and Charlamagne Tha God
Nov 12 • 27 min
Eliza Griswold spoke recently with Doug Pagitt, a pastor from Minneapolis who is a politically progressive evangelical Christian. Pagitt left his church to found an organization called Vote Common Good, which aims to move at least some religious voters…
The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA
Nov 8 • 22 min
Jeff Sessions, then the Attorney General, announced in 2017 the cancellation of the Obama-era policy known as DACA—Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. A number of plaintiffs sued, and their case goes to the Supreme Court next week. The New Yorker’s…
How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit
Nov 5 • 24 min
One of the almost unsolvable problems with the U.K.’s exit from the E.U. is that it would necessitate a “hard border” between Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., and the Republic of Ireland, which would remain a member nation in Europe. The…
Can Mayor Pete Be a Democratic Front-Runner?
Nov 1 • 25 min
Six months ago, David Remnick interviewed a politician named Pete Buttigieg, who was just beginning his campaign for the Democratic nomination for President. Buttigieg was an unlikely candidate: the youngest person to run in decades, he was a small-town…
Horror with a Real-Life Message
Oct 25 • 21 min
The director Sophia Takal is working on a remake of “Black Christmas,” an early slasher flick from Canada, in which sorority girls are picked off by a gruesome killer. Takal brought a very 2019 sensibility to the remake, reflecting on the ongoing struggle…
Roomful of Teeth Redefines Vocal Music for the Future
Oct 22 • 13 min
For a new music ensemble, Roomful of Teeth has made an extraordinary impression in a short time. Caroline Shaw, one of its vocalists, received the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for “Partita for 8 Voices,” which was written for the group. Then, in 2014, the vocal…
Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence
Oct 18 • 23 min
Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein and other accused perpetrators of sexual assault helped opened the floodgates of the #MeToo movement. In his new book, “Catch and Kill,” and in “The Black Cube Chronicles” published on newyorker.com, Farrow details…
Nancy Pelosi: “Timing Is Everything”
Oct 14 • 42 min
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has a lot of fights on her hands. After she led the Democrats to victory in the 2018 midterm elections, her legislative agenda hit a number of roadblocks, including the Republican-controlled Senate. But it is Pelosi’s…
New Yorker Writers on Hong Kong, and Nixon After Tiananmen Square
Oct 11 • 36 min
The months of protests in Hong Kong may be the biggest political crisis facing Chinese leadership since the Tiananmen Square massacre a generation ago. What began as objections to a proposed extradition law has morphed into a broad-based protest movement.…
Adam Gopnik on Aging, and a Visit to Maine with Elizabeth Strout
Oct 4 • 27 min
In fifteen years, people of retirement age will outnumber children for the first time in U.S. history. But, the staff writer Adam Gopnik finds, the elderly are poorly served by the field of design, whether it’s a screw-top plastic bottle or the…
New Yorker Reporters on Impeachment
Oct 4 • 22 min
David Remnick asks five New Yorker contributors about the nascent impeachment proceedings against the President. Susan Glasser, the magazine’s Washington correspondent, notes that Republicans have attacked the inquiry but have not exactly defended the…
Cory Booker on How to Defeat Donald Trump
Sep 27 • 44 min
Senator Cory Booker burst onto the national scene about a decade ago, after serving as the mayor of the notoriously impoverished and dangerous city of Newark, New Jersey. To get that job, Booker challenged an entrenched establishment. “My political…
The Green Rush
Sep 20 • 49 min
It was just seven years ago that Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Today the drug is legal in eleven states and counting, with polls showing that sixty per cent of Americans support its…
Brittany Howard, of Alabama Shakes, Talks with David Remnick
Sep 17 • 25 min
Alabama Shakes started out playing covers at local gigs but quickly found a unique personal voice rooted in rock and soul. The band came to national attention, found a wide and devoted public, and soon earned four Grammys, for the album “Sound and Color.”…
A Texas Republican Exits the House
Sep 13 • 25 min
An exodus is under way in the House of Representatives: not even halfway into the congressional term, fifteen Republicans have announced that they will not run in 2020. One of the exiting members is Will Hurd, a former C.I.A. officer who was elected in…
For a French Burglar, Stealing Masterpieces Is Easier Than Selling Them
Sep 10 • 20 min
Vjeran Tomic has been stealing since he was a small child, when he used a ladder to break into a library in his home town, in Bosnia. After moving to Paris, he graduated to lucrative apartment burglaries, living off the jewels he took and often doing time…
Salman Rushdie’s Fantastical American Quest Novel
Sep 6 • 30 min
The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Deborah Treisman, talks with Salman Rushdie about “Quichotte,” his apocalyptic quest novel. A few years ago, when the four hundredth anniversary of “Don Quixote” was being celebrated, Rushdie reread Cervantes’s book and…
The New Norms of Affirmative Consent
Sep 3 • 30 min
Mischele Lewis learned that her fiancé was a con man and a convicted pedophile. By lying about who he was, did he violate her consent, and commit assault? Lewis’s story raises a larger question: What is consent, and how do we give it? It’s currently the…
Marianne Williamson Would Like to Clarify
Aug 30 • 16 min
Marianne Williamson, the self-help author associated with the New Age movement, has never held political office. But the race for the Presidency, she thinks, is less a battle of politics than a battle of souls. In her appearance in the July Democratic…
Jia Tolentino on the Rise and Fall of the Internet
Aug 27 • 29 min
Jia Tolentino writes for The New Yorker about an extremely wide range of topics, but a central concern is what it has meant to her to have grown up alongside the Internet. In her new, best-selling collection of essays, “Trick Mirror: Reflections on…
Roger Federer Opens Up
Aug 23 • 19 min
The winner of twenty Grand Slam titles and the top-ranked men’s player for three hundred and ten weeks, Roger Federer remains a dominant force in tennis. On the eve of playing in his nineteenth U.S. Open, Federer spoke with David Remnick about how he got…
Derren Brown’s Big Secret
Aug 20 • 29 min
Derren Brown wants you to know that he is not a magician. The term he prefers to use is “psychological illusionist,” and his acts mix psychology, misdirection, and showmanship. When he performs, he’s explicit about engaging with audiences’ minds and…
Maggie Gyllenhaal on “The Deuce” and #MeToo
Aug 16 • 20 min
Maggie Gyllenhaal’s first starring role was in the 2002 movie “Secretary,” a distriburbing romantic comedy about a troubled woman in a sadomasochistic relationship with her boss. Since then, Gyllenhaal has continued to push the boundaries of how sex is…
Ian Frazier Among the Drone Racers
Aug 13 • 17 min
Ian Frazier, who has chronicled American life for The New Yorker for more than forty years, travelled to a house in Fort Collins, Colorado, where three roommates build, fly, and race drones. Jordan Temkin, Zachry Thayer, and Travis McIntyre are three of…
The Rippling Effects of China’s One-Child Policy
Aug 9 • 14 min
Nanfu Wang grew up under China’s one-child policy and never questioned it. “You don’t know that it’s something initiated and implemented by the authority,” she tells The New Yorker’s Jiayang Fan. “It’s a normal part of everything. Just like water exists,…
Toni Morrison Talks with Hilton Als
Aug 6 • 48 min
Toni Morrison read The New York Times with pencil in hand. An editor by trade, Morrison never stopped noting errors in the paper. In 2015, during a conversation with The New Yorker’s Hilton Als, Morrison noted that the stories she cared about were once…
Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo, Part 2
Aug 6 • 17 min
In January, The New Yorker’s Ben Taub travelled to Mauritania to meet with Mohamedou Salahi. An electrical engineer who had lived in Germany, Salahi was detained at Guantánamo Bay for fifteen years and tortured, despite the fact that he was not a…
Living in the Shadow of Guantánamo
Aug 2 • 31 min
When Mohamedou Salahi arrived at the Guantánamo Bay detention camp, in August of 2002, he was hopeful. He knew why he had been detained: he had crossed paths with Al Qaeda operatives, and his cousin had once called him from Osama bin Laden’s phone. But…
Summer, By The Book
Jul 30 • 32 min
The cultural critic Doreen St. Félix goes to Madame Tussauds with Justin Kuritzkes, the début author of the novel “Famous People,” to talk about the nature of celebrity. Jia Tolentino heads for the children’s section of a bookstore with Rivka Galchen to…
Tana French on “The Witch Elm”
Jul 26 • 17 min
Tana French was an actor in her thirties when she sat down to write about a mystery that took the lives of two children, which became the global blockbuster “In the Woods.” With her subsequent books about the Dublin Murder Squad, French became known as…
Jelani Cobb Talks with the Artist Fahamu Pecou
Jul 23 • 16 min
Fahamu Pecou has shown work in museums all over the country and appeared on television shows like “Empire” and “black-ish.” The men the artist depicts tend to strike exaggerated poses, with sagging bluejeans and a cascade of colorful boxer shorts. Pecou…
Watching the Moon Landing
Jul 19 • 28 min
Some people have always believed that the moon landing was a government hoax, and, in the age of the Internet, that conspiracy theory continues to thrive. Andrew Marantz explores the value of skepticism, and the point at which disbelief leads to a…
Tom Hanks Reads His Tale of Going to the Moon
Jul 18 • 19 min
In 2014, Tom Hanks—the star of “Apollo 13,” among many other accomplishments—wrote a short story about going to the moon. But his was not a dramatic story of NASA heroes facing grave danger. Hanks told the tale of a very twenty-first century mission,…
Carly Rae Jepsen Talks with Amanda Petrusich
Jul 16 • 14 min
“I can remember, even four months after [“Call Me Maybe” ’s] release, being claimed in the press as a one-hit wonder,” Carly Rae Jepsen says. “Isn’t it too soon to decide that? Give me a chance!” The Canadian singer and songwriter was by no means a…
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on the 2020 Presidential Race and Why We Should Break up Homeland Security
Jul 9 • 57 min
It’s hard to recall a newly elected freshman representative to Congress who has made a bigger impact than Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Her primary victory for New York’s Fourteenth District seat—as a young woman of color beating out a long-established white…
Aaron Sorkin Rewrites “To Kill a Mockingbird”
Jul 9 • 27 min
As he set about adapting “To Kill a Mockingbird” for the stage, Aaron Sorkin found himself troubled by its protagonist, the small-town lawyer Atticus Finch. Harper Lee’s Finch, he thought, is tolerant to a fault—understanding rather than condemning the…
As Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith Hit the Road
Jul 5 • 19 min
Tracy K. Smith was named Poet Laureate, in 2017, right after the most divisive election of our time. She could have spent her two-year appointment writing and enjoying a nice office in the Library of Congress, but she felt poetry might be able to help…
Valeria Luiselli on Reënacting the Border
Jul 2 • 31 min
Valeria Luiselli first travelled to the U.S.–Mexico border in 2014, when the current immigration crisis began to heat up. Under the Trump Presidency, the border has become the dead center of American politics, and Luiselli returned with the radio producer…
Emily Nussbaum Likes to Watch
Jun 28 • 17 min
For decades, critical praise for a TV show was that it was “not like TV,” but more like a novel or a movie. That ingrained hierarchy always bugged Emily Nussbaum, who went on to win the Pulitzer Prize for her criticism in The New Yorker. She has been…
The Trump Administration’s Plan to Deport Victims of Human Trafficking
Jun 25 • 25 min
The New Yorker contributor Jenna Krajeski recently met with a woman who calls herself Esperanza. In her home country, Esperanza was coerced and threatened into prostitution, and later was trafficked into the United States, where she was subjected to…
Dexter Filkins on the Dangerous Escalations between the U.S. and Iran
Jun 21 • 20 min
After a U.S. drone was allegedly shot down by Iran last week, relations between Tehran and Washington are again approaching a low point; on Thursday, President Trump ordered and then called off an air strike. The situation has been deteriorating since the…
David Remnick Talks with Robert Caro about “Working”
Jun 18 • 30 min
Robert Caro is a historical biographer unlike anyone else writing today, with the Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards, and other honors to prove it. But to call his books biographies seems to miss the mark: they’re so rich in detail, so accurate, and at…
Will the Government Get Tough on Big Tech?
Jun 14 • 18 min
Apple, Amazon, Alphabet (which owns Google), and Facebook—known in the tech world as the Big Four—are among the largest and most profitable companies in the world, and they’ve been accustomed to the laxest of oversight from Washington. But the climate may…
From Stonewall to the Present, Fifty Years of L.G.B.T.Q. Rights
Jun 7 • 49 min
Masha Gessen co-hosts this episode of the New Yorker Radio Hour, guiding David Remnick through the fifty years of civil-rights gains for L.G.B.T.Q. people. From drag queens reading to children at the library to a popular gay Presidential candidate, we’ll…
Ava DuVernay on “When They See Us,” About the Boys Who Became the Central Park Five
Jun 4 • 28 min
Ava DuVernay doesn’t like using the term Central Park Five—a moniker created by the press in the aftermath of the notorious and brutal assault of a twenty-eight-year-old woman, Trisha Meili. “They’re not the Central Park Five,” she tells the New Yorker…
Emily Nussbaum on TV’s “Deluge” of #MeToo Plots
May 31 • 20 min
The #MeToo movement of recent years started in the entertainment industry, with revelations about moguls such as Harvey Weinstein and CBS’s Les Moonves, and, since 2017, television writers have been grappling with how to address sexual harassment for a…
Who Should Receive Reparations for Slavery and Discrimination?
May 28 • 28 min
The idea of reparations—real compensation made to the descendants of slaves or the victims of legalized discrimination—has gained traction since the publication, in 2014, of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s influential article “The Case for Reparations,” which appeared…
Is America Ready to Make Reparations?
May 24 • 49 min
Late in the Civil War, the Union general William T. Sherman confiscated four hundred thousand acres of land from Confederate planters and ordered it redistributed, in forty-acre lots, to formerly enslaved people—a promise revoked by President Andrew…
Lucinda Williams Talks with Ariel Levy
May 21 • 16 min
Despite winning a Grammy for her song “Passionate Kisses,” which was performed by Mary Chapin Carpenter, Lucinda Williams spent many years overlooked by the music industry: she was too country for rock, too rock for country. In 1998, American music caught…
James Taylor Will Teach you Guitar
May 17 • 32 min
James Taylor’s songs are so familiar that they seem to have always existed. Onstage at the New Yorker Festival, in 2010, Taylor peeled back some of his influences—the Beatles, Bach, show tunes, and Antônio Carlos Jobim—and played a few of his hits, even…
What the Constitution Means to the Playwright Heidi Schreck
May 14 • 23 min
Few Americans dispute the centrality of the Constitution as a statement of our country’s goals; it is as though holy. But what the Constitution actually means to any two people may differ widely, and those differences are dramatized in a new play, on…
Bill McKibben and Elizabeth Kolbert: Is It Too Late to Save the World?
May 10 • 26 min
After years of languishing far down the list of voters’ priorities, climate change has moved to the top of many voters’ concerns, according to a new CNN poll. Now Presidential candidates are competing to establish themselves as leaders on the issue, and…
Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and Comedian Pete Holmes
May 3 • 26 min
Senator Kirsten Gillibrand been fierce on the issue of sexual assault and harassment, especially in the military and government; as a champion of the MeToo movement, she was among the first Democrats to call for Senator Al Franken to step down. Some in…
Rhiannon Giddens, Americana’s Queen, Goes Global
May 3 • 23 min
By the standards of any musician, Rhiannon Giddens has a twisting and complex path. Trained as an operatic soprano at the prestigious Oberlin Conservatory, Giddens fell almost by chance into the study of American folk music. Alongside two like-minded…
A New Approach to Dementia Care
Apr 30 • 19 min
In the field of memory care, there is a fierce debate around the question of honesty. Lying can, under certain circumstances, alleviate or avert distress in patients who are suffering from memory loss. But, on principle, many providers, patients, and…
Julián Castro Is Not Afraid
Apr 26 • 30 min
In a crowded Democratic field, the candidate Julián Castro is eager to stand out. One way he’s tried to do that is by taking on the issue of immigration—a favorite topic of President Donald Trump, and one that’s important to his base. In a wide-ranging…
The Green New Deal, and an Unusual Night at the Orchestra
Apr 23 • 34 min
The Green New Deal is coming to the table during the one of the most divisive periods Washington has ever seen. Two advocates of the environmental plan—a young activist championing the cause, and a veteran of climate politics in Washington—consider what…
The N.R.A.’s Financial Mess
Apr 19 • 16 min
Last March, Wayne LaPierre sent a fund-raising letter to his members—an urgent plea for money. LaPierre described an attack on the Second Amendment that is unprecedented in the history of the country. But, in reality, what is endangering the N.R.A. isn’t…
The actor Christine Baranski on “The Good Fight,” and Kurt Vile on Songwriting
Apr 16 • 30 min
Christine Baranski was a successful theatre actor who would never stoop to do television in the old days. But when she got the pilot script for “Cybill,” and had two daughters to put through school, she took the role of Marianne, the tough-talking best…
Masha Gessen and Keith Gessen Debate Russian and American Politics
Apr 12 • 19 min
Masha Gessen and Keith Gessen have, taken together, written more than a dozen books and a thousand articles. Keith Gessen is a founder of n+1, an influential literary journal; Masha has written for major newspapers and journals as well as, since 2014, The…
The Neurology of Bias, and a Visit with Thundercat
Apr 9 • 28 min
Most of us have biases and prejudices we don’t acknowledge—or aren’t even aware of. Admitting those biases is a baseline of political “wokeness.” But measuring and proving bias, and showing how it works, is another matter. Jennifer Eberhardt is a social…
The Presidential Candidate Pete Buttigieg on Coming Out: “I Realized I Couldn’t Go On Like That Forever”
Apr 5 • 21 min
During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala…
How OxyContin Was Sold to the Masses
Apr 2 • 32 min
Patrick Radden Keefe has reported on the Sackler family and their control of Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Among the sources for his article “Empire of Pain” was a whistle-blower named Steven May, a former sales rep who joined Purdue during the…
Has the Mueller Report Changed Anything?
Mar 29 • 17 min
The Mueller investigation has been a two-year obsession for nearly everyone who cares about politics in America. For one side, the special counsel was a bête noire, a leader of a witch hunt; for the other, Mueller was a deus ex machina who would end the…
U.K. Edges Closer to the Cliff of a No-Deal Brexit
Mar 26 • 30 min
Since the minute that British citizens voted, in a 2016 referendum, to leave the European Union, confusion and disorganization has consumed the U.K. Three years later, little has changed: confusion and disorganization may carry the U.K. over the cliff of…
Emilia Clarke on a Near-Death Experience Scarier than “Game of Thrones”
Mar 22 • 19 min
Emilia Clarke was an unknown young actor when she landed the part of Daenerys, of the House of Targaryen, on a show called “Game of Thrones.” After an eventful first season—capped by her walk into a funeral pyre and rebirth as the Mother of…
The Hot Fashion Trends in Silicon Valley, and the Top Chef Niki Nakayama
Mar 19 • 24 min
Silicon Valley has a reputation for being a place where young geniuses are too busy disrupting the world to buy clothes; jeans and a hoodie generally qualify as business attire. But that is changing, the New Yorker fashion correspondent Rachel Syme notes.…
Getting Detained by ICE—on Purpose
Mar 15 • 25 min
In 2012, two young activists from the National Immigrant Youth Alliance went on an undercover mission to infiltrate the Broward Transitional Center, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in Florida. NIYA had been contacted by the son of a man…
American Exiles in East Africa (Part 2)
Mar 12 • 32 min
Pete O’Neal was a street hustler and small-time pimp who gave up crime to fight oppression, founding the Kansas City chapter of the Black Panther Party. Charlotte Hill was a high-school student who gave up a college scholarship to join the Panthers and do…
American Exiles in East Africa
Mar 8 • 28 min
Pete O’Neal was a street hustler and small-time pimp who gave up crime to struggle against oppression, founding the Kansas City chapter of the Black Panther Party. Charlotte Hill was a high-school student who gave up a college scholarship to join the…
Jane Mayer on the Revolving Door Between Fox News and the White House
Mar 5 • 24 min
Donald Trump has made no secret of his great admiration for Fox News — which he praises by tweet nearly constantly — and his disdain for other, “fake news” outlets that he regards as “enemies of the people.” But the closeness of the relationship between…
A Moderate Republican Wants to Primary Donald Trump in 2020
Mar 1 • 27 min
The former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld is launching what looks like a political suicide mission. He recently announced an exploratory committee to challenge Trump in the primary. He sees a pathway to victory that runs through his neighboring state of…
A Writer Solves a Mystery, and Ruth E. Carter Steps into the Spotlight
Feb 22 • 35 min
Committed during a period filled with bombings, killings, and disappearances, the murder of Jean McConville remains one of the most infamous unsolved crimes of the Troubles. The writer Patrick Radden Keefe may have discovered who killed her. Plus, the…
What Are We Talking About When We Talk about Socialism?
Feb 19 • 33 min
With the election to the House of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib, following up on the surprising Presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders, socialism is on the rise, after a long decline in America. But the Harvard historian and New Yorker staff…
Teju Cole on Blackface and Valeria Luiselli on the Border Crisis
Feb 15 • 22 min
When depictions of Virginia politicians in blackface surfaced this month, the New Yorker contributor Teju Cole was unsurprised. “A white man of a certain age in the U.S.,” he reflects, “is found to have done something racist in his past; well, yes.” As a…
To Stop the Shooting, Lupe Cruz Gets Between the People with the Guns
Feb 12 • 14 min
Conversations about gun reform are often galvanized by catastrophic mass shootings. But gun violence mostly unfolds as a matter of awful routine: domestic-partner homicides, suicides, and shootings between people who know each other are everyday…
Is the Tide Turning on Gun Reform?
Feb 8 • 41 min
This week, the House held hearings on gun violence, the first in eight years. In the 2018 elections, gun-reform groups outspent the N.R.A.—which appears to be in financial trouble. After years of greatly expanded gun rights, is the tide turning on gun…
Marlon James Builds His Own Damn Universe
Feb 5 • 28 min
When the cast of the film “The Hobbit” was first announced, Marlon James was dismayed—though hardly surprised—by how white it was. A long-standing complaint of black fans of fantasy is that authors can imagine dwarves and elves and orcs, but not black…
The Mueller Investigation: What We Know So Far
Feb 1 • 26 min
Washington is abuzz with rumors that the Mueller report is coming soon, and both sides are trying to strategize their next move. The reporter Adam Davidson summarizes the broad strokes of what we know so far, and Susan B. Glasser and Jeffrey Toobin debate…
John Thompson vs. American Justice
Jan 29 • 55 min
When police showed up to question John Thompson, he was worried that it was because he had sold drugs to an undercover cop. When he realized they were investigating a murder, he could only laugh: “Shit, for real? Murder?”Thompson was insistent on his…
Jason Rezaian on Imprisonment in Iran
Jan 25 • 45 min
Jason Rezaian was born in California to an Iranian father and an American mother. After a failed effort to enter the Persian rug trade, he moved to Tehran to be a reporter, and was working for the Washington Post when he was arrested by Iranian…
The Fall of a Chinese Pop Star, and Calvin Trillin’s Happy Marriage
Jan 22 • 40 min
For some years, Denise Ho was one of the most popular singers in Asia. A Hong Kong native, she performed the style known as Cantopop in mainland China and in foreign countries with Chinese émigré populations. But, as Ho told the staff writer Jiayang Fan,…
The Producer dream hampton Talks with Jelani Cobb about “Surviving R. Kelly”
Jan 18 • 15 min
For decades, it’s been an open secret that R. Kelly has allegedly kept young women trapped in abusive relationships through psychological manipulation, fear, and intimidation. His domestic situation has been compared to a sex cult. He was acquitted of…
For a French Burglar, Stealing Masterpieces Is Easier Than Selling Them
Jan 15 • 20 min
Vjeran Tomic has been stealing since he was a small child, when he used a ladder to break into a library in his home town, in Bosnia. After moving to Paris, he graduated to lucrative apartment burglaries, living off the jewels he took and often doing time…
How “The Apprentice” Made Donald Trump, and a Boondoggle in Wisconsin
Jan 11 • 35 min
The staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe has reported on “The Apprentice” and its impact on Donald Trump—on how America saw Trump, and how Trump saw himself. Keefe spoke with Jonathon Braun, who was a supervising producer on “The Apprentice,” about how the…
The Director Boots Riley on “Sorry to Bother You”
Jan 8 • 18 min
Boots Riley’s directorial début, “Sorry to Bother You,” blends a dark strain of comedy with a sci-fi vision of capitalism run amok. The film’s hero, Cassius Green, is a telemarketer who rises quickly in the ranks—eventually becoming a “power caller”—after…
Live: Janet Mock and Chris Hayes
Jan 4 • 37 min
Janet Mock first heard the word “māhū,” a Native Hawaiian word for people who exist outside the male-female binary, when she was twelve. She had just moved back to Oahu, where she was born, from Texas, and, by that point, Mock knew that the gender she…
Philip Roth’s American Portraits and American Prophecy
Dec 28, 2018 • 55 min
The novelist and short-story writer Philip Roth died in May at the age of eighty-five. In novels like “Portnoy’s Complaint,” “The Human Stain,” and “American Pastoral,” Roth anatomized postwar American life—particularly the lives of Jewish people in the…
Christmas Music Reimagined with Kirk Douglas, the Guitarist for the Roots
Dec 23, 2018
Kirk Douglas, the guitarist for the Roots, plays anything and everything as part of the “Tonight Show” band, so David Remnick put him to the test on some holiday classics. Roz Chast rings a bell to collect pennies for a good cause: saving the globe from…
2018 in Pop Culture
Dec 21, 2018 • 15 min
The New Yorker staff writers Jia Tolentino, Doreen St. Félix, and Alexandra Schwartz all cover the culture beat from different angles. They talk with David Remnick about the emblematic pop-culture phenomena of 2018 that tell us where we were this year:…
Kelly Slater’s Perfect Wave Brings Surfing to a Crossroads
Dec 18, 2018 • 23 min
In December of 2015, a video appeared on the Internet that stunned surfers worldwide. Titled “Kelly’s Wave,” it showed Kelly Slater—arguably the best pro surfer in history—unveiling a secret project he had been working on for more than a decade. With the…
Aaron Sorkin Rewrites “To Kill a Mockingbird”
Dec 14, 2018 • 32 min
As he set about adapting “To Kill a Mockingbird” for the stage—the play opened this week on Broadway—Aaron Sorkin first wrote a version that he says was very much like the novel, but “with stage directions.” As he delved into the character of Atticus…
Robyn Talks with David Remnick
Dec 7, 2018 • 33 min
For the past twenty-five years, since she was a young teen-ager, the singer Robyn has been on the cutting edge of pop music. Her sound is sparse and complex, influenced by electro and dance music while preserving the catchiness of pop. After a brief stint…
Helen Rosner Ferments at Home, Plus Dexter Filkins on Saudi Arabia
Dec 4, 2018 • 24 min
One of the hot trends in the food world is one of the oldest: fermentation. No longer just for beer and sauerkraut, fermentation—which Helen Rosner calls “bacteria engaging with your food”—is the subject of cookbooks, and the specialty of destination…
Voter Suppression in the Twenty-First Century
Nov 30, 2018 • 31 min
In the November midterm elections, Stacey Abrams, a gubernatorial candidate in Georgia, arrived at her polling place to cast a vote for herself, only to have a poll worker claim that she had already filed for an absentee ballot. Carol Anderson’s book “One…
Bridget Everett Talks with Michael Schulman
Nov 27, 2018 • 21 min
Appearing at the New Yorker Festival, in conversation with Michael Schulman , Bridget Everett brought her dog onstage. It was unconventional, but no more so than anything else she does. Vulgar, badly behaved, and entirely comfortable with herself,…
Jim Carrey Doesn’t Exist (According to Jim Carrey)
Nov 23, 2018 • 36 min
As a young boy, Jim Carrey got in trouble for staring in the mirror. He didn’t do it because he was vain; he was practicing the comic skills that made him one of the great impressionists of our time, a man whose face seems to be made of some pliable alien…
The Star Witnesses Against El Chapo
Nov 20, 2018 • 23 min
Last year, the Mexican government finally agreed to extradite the notorious drug kingpin El Chapo to the U.S. Born Joaquín Guzmán Loera, he was once ranked by Forbes as one of the most powerful people in the world. His trial began in New York, on November…
The Countdown to Brexit, Plus Adam Gopnik’s Turkey Zen
Nov 16, 2018 • 32 min
More than two years after British voters approved a measure to withdraw their nation from the European Union—a gigantic undertaking with no roadmap of any sort —Prime Minister Theresa May unveiled a plan: essentially, that the U.K. would remain in the…
After the 2008 Financial Crisis, the Economy Was Fracked Up
Nov 13, 2018 • 19 min
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act injected almost nine hundred billion dollars into the U.S. economy to help the nation recover from the 2008 financial crisis. Ninety billion dollars went to clean energy, with the intention of jump-starting a new…
The Financial Crash and the Climate Crisis
Nov 9, 2018 • 36 min
Ten years after the financial crash of 2008, the economy is humming along, with steady growth and rising employment. Yet that crisis continues to shape our world, particularly through the rise of right-wing populism and the ever-worsening climate crisis.…
Derek Smalls—Harry Shearer’s Character in “Spinal Tap”—Returns with His Solo Début
Nov 6, 2018 • 23 min
Harry Shearer is known for doing many characters, including Mr. Burns and others from “The Simpsons,” but the most famous is Derek Smalls, the saturnine, epically muttonchopped bassist in the movie “This Is Spinal Tap.” Almost thirty-five years after the…
From Mexico, the Reality of the Migrant Caravan
Nov 2, 2018 • 30 min
Jonathan Blitzer spent a week in Mexico with the so-called caravan—a group of about five thousand migrants, most of them from Honduras, who are making a dangerous journey on foot to the U.S. border. Donald Trump, who has described the caravan as…
Janelle Monáe, from the Future to the Present
Oct 30, 2018 • 30 min
Janelle Monáe is an unlikely pop star. Her music is rooted in soul and R. & B., but also in pop, punk, and New Wave; her early releases were science-fiction concept albums, influenced by Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” and modern Afrofuturism, set far in the…
Daniel Radcliffe Gets His Facts Straight, and Pennsylvania’s Pipeline Politics
Oct 26, 2018 • 25 min
The actor Daniel Radcliffe is on Broadway in a new play called “The Lifespan of a Fact”—perhaps the first-ever work of theatre in which a fact checker is a starring role. Radcliffe’s character is obsessive about his work, and he becomes locked in combat…
Kelela Reinvents R. & B., and Sally Yates Gets Fired
Oct 23, 2018 • 42 min
When the acting Attorney General Sally Yates wouldn’t defend the so-called Muslim travel ban, she was promptly sacked—“before it was fashionable to be fired” in the Trump Administration, Jeffrey Toobin says. Yates, who served in the Justice Department…
In the Midterms, White Supremacy Is Running for Office
Oct 19, 2018 • 14 min
While the big story going into the midterm elections has been the possibility of a “blue wave”—an upsurge of Democratic progressives, including a high number of women and minority candidates—the divisive political climate has also given us the very…
Joan Baez Is Still Protesting
Oct 16, 2018 • 21 min
“You know, I think as I get older,” Joan Baez tells David Remnick, “someone will show me a photograph”—of the March on Washington, for example—“and I’ll think, ‘Oh my god, I was there. And those people were there, and Dr. King said what he said.’…
Is Voting Safe?
Oct 12, 2018 • 33 min
For democracy to function, we have to trust and accept the results of elections. But that trust is increasingly difficult to maintain in a world where malicious actors like the G.R.U., the Russian intelligence agency, have been actively probing our…
The Long-Distance Con, Part 2
Oct 9, 2018 • 36 min
This is part two of a two-part series. Part one can be heard here. On the day that Maggie Robinson Katz learned that her father had only a few days to live, she also found out that her wealthy family couldn’t pay his hospital bills. Her father, Terry…
Rebecca Traister Is Happy to Be Mad
Oct 5, 2018 • 17 min
After the election of Donald Trump, the feminist journalist Rebecca Traister began channeling her anger into a book. The result, “Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger” combines an analysis of how women’s anger is discouraged and…
Joan Jett’s Reputation
Oct 2, 2018 • 26 min
Joan Jett cut a massive figure in rock and roll, starting in the nineteen-seventies and continuing with a string of hits including “I Love Rock and Roll,” “Bad Reputation,” “Crimson and Clover,” and others. Jett was kind of glam, kind of punk, and…
The Long-Distance Con, Part 1
Sep 28, 2018 • 27 min
On the day that Maggie Robinson Katz learned that her father had only a few days to live, she also found out that her wealthy family couldn’t pay his hospital bills: his fortune had disappeared. Katz didn’t learn how until several years later, when she…
Into the Woods with Scott Carrier
Sep 25, 2018 • 26 min
After a thirty-year lobbying effort, Congress designated the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail in 2009. Unlike the well-known Appalachian Trail and Pacific Crest Trail, the P.N.T. runs east-west, trekking twelve hundred miles across multiple…
Lisa Brennan-Jobs on the Shadow of Steve Jobs, and Jill Lepore on the Long Sweep of American History
Sep 21, 2018 • 29 min
Lisa Brennan-Jobs’s memoir, “Small Fry,” shares a common theme with many memoirs: the absent parent and the mark left by that absence in the adult writer. But the parent, in this case, is a figure who has also left his mark on the larger world. While…
Rachel Carson Dreams of the Sea
Sep 18, 2018 • 40 min
Before she published “Silent Spring,” one of the most influential books of the last century, Rachel Carson was a young aspiring poet and then a doctoral candidate in marine biology. Although she couldn’t swim and disliked boats, says historian Jill…
Illeana Douglas Steps Forward
Sep 14, 2018 • 16 min
The day after The New Yorker published Ronan Farrow’s exposé about Harvey Weinstein, Farrow got a phone call from the actress and screenwriter Illeana Douglas. She wanted to talk about Leslie Moonves, who was then the head of CBS and one of the most…
Kwame Anthony Appiah on the Complications of Identity
Sep 11, 2018 • 14 min
Kwame Anthony Appiah is one of leading thinkers on identity. A professor of philosophy and law at New York University, Appiah also writes the New York Times Magazine’s Ethicist column, answering readers’ questions on a wide range of common but thorny…
Parenting While Deported
Sep 7, 2018 • 40 min
Idalia and Arnold came to this country nearly two decades ago, from Honduras. They settled in a small city in New England and found the working-class jobs of the type common to undocumented Central Americans: janitorial, hotel housekeeping and…
Rev. Franklin Graham Offers an Evangelist’s View of Donald Trump
Sep 4, 2018 • 21 min
Like his father, Rev. Billy Graham, before him, Rev. Franklin Graham is one of the nation’s most prominent preachers, influential in the evangelical world and in the highest echelons of Washington. But where Billy Graham came to regret that he had…
For a Palestinian Candidate, a Contested Election in Jerusalem
Aug 31, 2018 • 34 min
Ramadan Dabash is a civil engineer and a mukhtar—an Arab community leader—in his neighborhood of East Jerusalem. His run for a seat on the city council of Jerusalem has been making international headlines because the Palestinian community has long refused…
David Simon’s “The Deuce” Charts the Rise of Pornography
Aug 28, 2018 • 38 min
David Simon is sympathetic to the sex workers he depicts in “The Deuce,” which will return to HBO for its second season in September. He is even sympathetic to some of the pimps and mobsters who were involved in the early years of the porn business. He is…
An N.Y.P.D. Sergeant Blows the Whistle on Quotas
Aug 24, 2018 • 17 min
Sergeant Edwin Raymond is the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit filed by a group of New York City police officers who have become famous as “the N.Y.P.D.-12.” They claim that, despite a 2010 statewide ban, officers are forced to meet monthly quotas for arrests…
Three Actors Explain What It Means to be “Presidential”
Aug 21, 2018 • 26 min
During the lead-up to the 2016 election, three actors who have played fictional Presidents of the United States discussed what it means to be “Presidential,” in a panel moderated by Michael Schulman. Bill Pullman, who, as President Thomas J. Whitmore,…
Seth Meyers Talks with Ariel Levy
Aug 17, 2018 • 29 min
Seth Meyers—a veteran of “Saturday Night Live” and the host of NBC’s “Late Night with Seth Meyers”—sat down at the 2017 New Yorker Festival to walk Ariel Levy through a career that seems charmed. As an unknown improv performer, Meyers was picked for the…
David Remnick on Aretha Franklin
Aug 14, 2018 • 6 min
Aretha Franklin brought Barack Obama to tears when she performed “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” at the Kennedy Center Honors tribute to Carole King in December 2015. When video from that event went viral, it reawakened Aretha fans across the…
Weeding with Parker Posey
Aug 14, 2018 • 16 min
Parker Posey has been a vivid presence in American film, especially indie film, for twenty-five years. She got her start in “Dazed and Confused,” and went on to appear in dozens of movies, including Christopher Guest’s cult-classic satires “Waiting For…
Lee Child, “Moby-Dick,” and Other Summer Reads
Aug 10, 2018 • 40 min
We delve into the escapist joys of a great summer read. David Remnick talks with Lee Child, whose thrillers about Jack Reacher—twenty-three books and counting, with a hundred million copies in print—bring the mystique of the cowboy to modern America.…
William Finnegan Surfing, and Kristen Roupenian Among the Pilgrims
Aug 7, 2018 • 26 min
William Finnegan’s memoir, “Barbarian Days,” from 2015, holds the distinction of being the one book about surfing to win a Pulitzer Prize. On a Sunday morning, not long past dawn, he took David Remnick to the Rockaways for his first and only surfing…
Astrid Holleeder’s Crime Family
Aug 3, 2018 • 29 min
All her life, Astrid Holleeder knew that her older brother Willem was involved in crime; in their tough Amsterdam neighborhood, and as children of an abusive father, it wasn’t a shocking development. But she was stunned when, in 1983, Willem and his best…
Tommy Orange and the Urban Native Experience
Jul 31, 2018 • 25 min
Tommy Orange had never read a book about what it means to be a Native American in a big city. In a conversation with The New Yorker’s fiction editor, Orange says that urban Native writers like himself—he is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of…
Helsinki Fallout
Jul 27, 2018 • 30 min
At the recent summit in Helsinki, Vladimir Putin proposed that, in exchange for letting Robert Mueller interrogate some G.R.U. agents who are linked to election hacking, the U.S. should turn over a group of officials and citizens to Moscow. The most…
Thomas McGuane and Callan Wink Go Fishing
Jul 24, 2018 • 20 min
Thomas McGuane, the acclaimed author of “The Sporting Club,” thinks fiction set in the American West could stand to lose some of its ranching clichés. The novelist, a consummate outdoorsman and devoted fisherman, met up with the writer Callan Wink, who…
Philip Roth’s American Portraits and American Prophecy
Jul 20, 2018 • 55 min
The novelist and short-story writer Philip Roth died in May at the age of eighty-five. In novels like “Portnoy’s Complaint,” “The Human Stain,” and “American Pastoral,” Roth anatomized postwar American life—particularly the lives of Jewish people in the…
The Rezneck Riders
Jul 17, 2018 • 26 min
The Navajo Nation covers over twenty-seven thousand square miles in Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico; it’s an area roughly the size of West Virginia. Vincent Salabye grew up there, in a community troubled by memories of conquest by the United States Army and…
Brazil, Bruce Lee, and Black Lives in the Music of Kamasi Washington, and the Uncertain Future of the Democratic Party
Jul 13, 2018 • 29 min
Benjamin Wallace-Wells provides a survey of some key midterm races and considers what they tell us about the direction of the Democratic Party. And David Remnick speaks with the saxophonist and bandleader Kamasi Washington. For anyone who thinks of jazz…
Love, War, and the Magical Lamb-Brain Sandwiches of Aleppo, Syria
Jul 10, 2018 • 29 min
When Adam Davidson was a reporter in Baghdad during the Iraq War, he started dating a fellow-reporter, Jen Banbury, of Salon. On a holiday break, they left the war zone and traveled to Aleppo, Syria—then a beautiful, ancient, bustling city—and, while…
Tina Brown on Vanity Fair, the Eighties, and Harvey Weinstein
Jul 6, 2018 • 26 min
Tina Brown is a legend in New York publishing. She was barely thirty years old when she was recruited from London to take over a foundering Vanity Fair. Take over she did, becoming one of the power centers of New York culture by bringing together the…
Naomi Klein Interviewed by Jia Tolentino
Jul 3, 2018 • 23 min
The author of “No Logo” and “The Shock Doctrine,” Naomi Klein has become what Noam Chomsky was to an earlier generation of leftists. Her theories tie inequality and climate change together, arguing that capitalists use disasters to advance the agenda of…
Hasan Minhaj Interviewed by Vinson Cunningham
Jun 29, 2018 • 32 min
On a high-school speech-and-debate team, Hasan Minhaj learned the value of a joke: “If I made the judges laugh, I automatically saw an increase in the amount of points that I would get. And so I was like, ‘Oh, that’s a really powerful tool to get people…
Molly Ringwald, Judd Apatow, and #MeToo
Jun 26, 2018 • 32 min
The John Hughes films that made Molly Ringwald famous—“Sixteen Candles,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “The Breakfast Club”—look very different to their star now that she has a teen-age daughter of her own. Speaking with the writer and director Judd Apatow, who…
The Government Took Her Son. Will It Give Him Back?
Jun 22, 2018 • 22 min
Border Patrol, which has forcibly separated families in border detention, has put some immigrant children in the care of a separate agency, the Office of Refugee Resettlement. Although a recent executive order modified the Administration’s “zero…
The Comedian Hannah Gadsby Goes Big Time, and Renounces Comedy
Jun 19, 2018 • 24 min
Hannah Gadsby is a headlining comedian in Australia, a regular at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and is about to become a very big deal in America with a special on Netflix called “Nanette.” It’s a full-length comedy show, and at the same time, a…
James Wood Is Done “Prosecuting Wars”
Jun 15, 2018 • 32 min
Jane Mayer explains why Charles and David Koch are willing to spend as much as thirty million dollars on advertising that opposes Donald Trump’s campaign of tariffs—right as the midterm elections offer voters a referendum on his Presidency. And David…
In the Civil Service, Loyalty Now Comes Before Expertise
Jun 12, 2018 • 20 min
Donald Trump came into office promising to make so many cuts to the government that “your head will spin.” Evan Osnos has been reporting from Washington on how the Administration is radically changing the civil service, and he’s found that, to a degree…
Another Fiasco for American Soccer, and Praying for Tangier
Jun 9, 2018 • 34 min
The 2018 World Cup begins this week in Russia, and America is taking a powder. The men’s team failed to qualify for the tournament after a stunning upset loss to Trinidad and Tobago, which is considered to be one of the worst teams in competition. Perhaps…
Anthony Bourdain’s Interview with David Remnick
Jun 8, 2018 • 19 min
Anthony Bourdain—the chef turned author, food anthropologist, and television star—died this week, at sixty-one. Bourdain made his début in The New Yorker in 1999, with an essay called “Don’t Eat Before Reading This,” about working in the restaurant…
Angélique Kidjo and David Byrne on “Remain in Light”
Jun 5, 2018 • 22 min
When a young Amanda Petrusich, now a staff writer who covers music, first heard Talking Heads’ “Remain in Light,” she felt “almost like it was being beamed in from outer space.” The record, released in 1980, was strikingly original—a hybrid of…
Glenda Jackson Onstage, and Marco Rubio on “Modernizing” Conservatism
Jun 1, 2018 • 35 min
Glenda Jackson, who has played both Queen Elizabeth and King Lear, served as a humble member of Parliament for more than two decades in between those roles; she talks with David Remnick about performing at eighty-two and about the state of British…
Malcolm Gladwell on the Sociology of School Shooters
May 29, 2018 • 24 min
Malcolm Gladwell spoke with The New Yorker’s Dorothy Wickenden in 2015 about the social dynamics of school shootings. Studying the literature of sociology, Gladwell compares shootings to a riot, in which each person’s act of violence makes the next act…