The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

www.theguardian.com/news/series/the-audio-long-read
The Guardian’s Audio Long Reads podcasts are a selection of the Guardian’s long read articles which are published in the paper and online. It gives you the opportunity to get on with your day whilst listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer: in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more


How liberalism became ‘the god that failed’ in eastern Europe
Nov 18 • 24 min
After communism fell, the promises of western liberalism to transform central and eastern Europe were never fully realised – and now we are seeing the backlash. By Ivan Krastev and Stephen Holmes. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Why do people hate vegans?
Nov 15 • 33 min
It has left the beige-tinted margins and become social media’s most glamorous look. But why does veganism still provoke so much anger? By George Reynolds. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘A body drifted past the window’: surviving the Ladbroke Grove train crash
Nov 11 • 27 min
On 5 October 1999, two trains collided at speed in west London, killing both drivers and 29 passengers. Barrister Greg Treverton-Jones, who survived the crash and worked on the harrowing inquiry, pieced together what went wrong. Help support our…
The real David Attenborough
Nov 8 • 32 min
He is the most beloved figure in Britain, and, at 93, a global superstar. His films long shied away from discussing humanity’s impact on the planet. Now they are sounding the alarm – but is it too late? By Patrick Barkham. Help support our independent…
Collision course: why are cars killing more and more pedestrians?
Nov 4 • 35 min
For drivers, roads are safer than ever – but for people on foot, they are getting deadlier. Car companies and Silicon Valley claim that they have the solution. But is that too good to be true? By Peter C Baker. Help support our independent journalism at…
Fifty shades of white: the long fight against racism in romance novels
Nov 1 • 52 min
For decades, the world of romantic fiction has been divided by a heated debate about racism and diversity. Is there any hope of a happy ending? By Lois Beckett. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Flour power: meet the bread heads baking a better loaf
Oct 28 • 32 min
The days of the mass-produced pappy white British supermarket loaf may be numbered. Meet the bread heads revolutionising the way we eat. By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘I’ve been here 50 years’: the EU citizens struggling for the right to stay in Britain
Oct 25 • 31 min
If they don’t secure the correct status, most EU nationals living in the UK post-Brexit will be classified as illegal immigrants. And after the Windrush scandal, we know what that looks like. By Amelia Gentleman. Help support our independent journalism at…
‘The way universities are run is making us ill’: inside the student mental health crisis
Oct 21 • 29 min
A surge in anxiety and stress is sweeping UK campuses. What is troubling students, and is it the universities’ job to fix it? By Samira Shackle. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The girl in the box: the mysterious crime that shocked Germany
Oct 18 • 42 min
On 15 September 1981, 10-year-old Ursula Herrmann headed home by bike from her cousin’s house. She never arrived. So began one of Germany’s most notorious postwar criminal cases, which remains contentious to this day. By Xan Rice. Help support our…
Ship of horrors: life and death on the lawless high seas
Oct 14 • 27 min
From bullying and sexual assault to squalid living conditions and forced labour, working at sea can be a grim business – and one deep-sea fishing fleet is particularly notorious. By Ian Urbina. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The myth of Eurabia: how a far-right conspiracy theory went mainstream
Oct 11 • 29 min
Once an obscure idea confined to the darker corners of the internet, the anti-Islam ideology is now visible in the everyday politics of the west. How did this happen? By Andrew Brown. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Why can’t we agree on what’s true any more?
Oct 7 • 30 min
It’s not about foreign trolls, filter bubbles or fake news. Technology encourages us to believe we can all have first-hand access to the ‘real’ facts – and now we can’t stop fighting about it. By William Davies. Help support our independent journalism at…
Dark crystals: the brutal reality behind a booming wellness craze
Oct 4 • 33 min
Demand for ‘healing’ crystals is soaring – but many are mined in deadly conditions in one of the world’s poorest countries. And there is little evidence that this billion-dollar industry is cleaning up its act. By Tess McClure. Help support our…
The cult of Columbine: how an obsession with school shooters led to a murder plot
Sep 30 • 36 min
How two lonely outsiders met online and discovered their passion – planning a massacre at a shopping mall. By Rachel Monroe. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
Inside the bizarre, bungled raid on North Korea’s Madrid embassy
Sep 27 • 40 min
In February, a gang of armed men took a North Korean official hostage and demanded that he defect. When he refused, their plan fell apart, and they fled. Who were they, and why did they risk everything on this wild plot? By Giles Tremlett. Help support…
Athleisure, barre and kale: the tyranny of the ideal woman
Sep 23 • 35 min
How we became suckers for the hard labor of self-optimization. By Jia Tolentino. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
The race to create a perfect lie detector, and the dangers of succeeding
Sep 20 • 31 min
AI and brain-scanning technology could soon make it possible to reliably detect when people are lying. But do we really want to know? By Amit Katwala. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The machine always wins: what drives our addiction to social media
Sep 16 • 27 min
Social media was supposed to liberate us, but for many people it has proved addictive, punishing and toxic. What keeps us hooked? By Richard Seymour. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Why it’s time to stop worrying about the decline of the English language
Sep 13 • 25 min
People often complain that English is deteriorating under the influence of new technology, adolescent fads and loose grammar. Why does this nonsensical belief persist? By David Shariatmadari. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Justin Trudeau: the rise and fall of a political brand
Sep 9 • 38 min
Thanks to his clever use of social media, he was dubbed the first prime minister of the Instagram age – but after four years in power, cracks in his image have started to show. By Ashifa Kassam. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The air conditioning trap: how cold air is heating the world
Sep 6 • 33 min
The warmer it gets, the more we use air conditioning. The more we use air conditioning, the warmer it gets. Is there any way out of this trap? By Stephen Buranyi. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Is fair trade finished?
Sep 2 • 40 min
Fairtrade changed the way we shop. But major companies have started to abandon it and set up their own in-house imitations – threatening the very idea of fair trade. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘Loud, obsessive, tribal’: the radicalisation of remain
Aug 30 • 40 min
They hate Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn. They no longer trust the BBC. They love civil servants, legal experts and James O’Brien. And now, consumed by the battle against Brexit, hardcore remainers are no longer the moderates. By Daniel Cohen. Help…
How the media contributed to the migrant crisis
Aug 26 • 20 min
Disaster reporting plays to set ideas about people from ‘over there’. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
Speed kills: are police chases out of control?
Aug 23 • 52 min
The public expects cops to pursue the bad guys. But a shocking tally of deaths has exposed how often these chases put the public at risk. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
From ball pits to water slides: the designer who changed children’s playgrounds for ever
Aug 19 • 24 min
Eric McMillan revolutionised playground design in the 1970s. Why has the spirit of experimental play that he championed been lost?. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
Dying the Christian Science way: the horror of my father’s last days
Aug 16 • 38 min
The anti-medical dogma of Christian Science led my father to an agonising death. Now the church itself is in decline – and it can’t happen fast enough. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Enslaved on a British cannabis farm: ‘The plants were more valuable than my life’
Aug 12 • 33 min
Minh was 16 when he was kidnapped, raped and trafficked to the UK, and then locked up and forced to grow cannabis. But when the police found him, he was treated like a criminal rather than a victim. By Annie Kelly. Help support our independent journalism…
Boar wars: how wild hogs are trashing European cities
Aug 9 • 40 min
They have become a menace in European cities. In Barcelona, where wild boar are jostling tourists and raiding rubbish bins, the fightback has begun. By Bernhard Warner. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
How Britain can help you get away with stealing millions: a five-step guide
Aug 5 • 28 min
Dirty money needs laundering if it’s to be of any use – and the UK is the best place in the world to do it. By Oliver Bullough. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
‘State capture’: the corruption investigation that has shaken South Africa
Aug 2 • 41 min
Gavin Watson was a hero of the struggle against apartheid. But this once-powerful businessman is now caught up in a sweeping inquiry that goes to the heart of how a nation is run. By Mark Gevisser. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The rise and fall of French cuisine
Jul 29 • 32 min
French food was the envy of the world – before it became trapped by its own history. Can a new school of traditionalists revive its glories? By Wendell Steavenson. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The new left economics: how a network of thinkers is transforming capitalism
Jul 26 • 39 min
After decades of rightwing dominance, a transatlantic movement of leftwing economists is building a practical alternative to neoliberalism. By Andy Beckett. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Are your tinned tomatoes picked by slave labour?
Jul 19 • 61 min
How the Italian mafia makes millions by exploiting migrants. By Tobias Jones and Ayo Awokoya. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
The invention of Essex: how a county became a caricature
Jul 12 • 39 min
From Loadsamoney and ‘Basildon man’ to Towie and Brexit – Essex has long been held up as both the authentic England and the crudest, stupidest symbol of Englishness. By Tim Burrows. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The mindfulness conspiracy
Jul 8 • 33 min
It is sold as a force that can help us cope with the ravages of capitalism, but with its inward focus, mindful meditation may be the enemy of activism • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
El Chapo: what the rise and fall of the kingpin reveals about the war on drugs
Jul 5 • 39 min
As the capture and conviction of Mexico’s notorious drug lord has shown, taking down the boss doesn’t mean taking down the organisation • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Why parents are addicted to Calpol
Jun 28 • 27 min
It is the one medicine we reach for whenever our babies are feverish or in pain. What’s the secret of its success? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘I wouldn’t be the refugee, I’d be the girl who kicked ass’: how taekwondo made me
Jun 21 • 29 min
When she arrived in the US as a 10-year-old refugee, Dina Nayeri found it hard to fit in. But that all changed when she hatched a plan to get into Harvard – by becoming a taekwondo champion • Read the text version here. Help support our independent…
The price of plenty: how beef changed America
Jun 17 • 32 min
Exploitation and predatory pricing drove the transformation of the US beef industry – and created the model for modern agribusiness • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘Socialism for the rich’: the evils of bad economics
Jun 14 • 26 min
The economic arguments adopted by Britain and the US in the 1980s led to vastly increased inequality – and gave the false impression that this outcome was not only inevitable, but good • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism…
The Anthropocene epoch: have we entered a new phase of planetary history?
Jun 10 • 37 min
Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘A zombie party’: the deepening crisis of conservatism
Jun 7 • 37 min
The traditional right is clinging on to power – but its ideas are dead in the water • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
Building the Brexit party: how Nigel Farage copied Italy’s digital populists
Jun 3 • 34 min
The former Ukip leader forged an alliance with the Five Star Movement just as they bulldozed Italian politics using a tightly controlled digital operation. And now he’s putting their techniques to work in Britain • Read the text version here. Help support…
From The Archers to HBO: how Sally Wainwright conquered TV
May 31 • 29 min
She was fired by Emmerdale, injected some much-needed grit into Coronation Street and struck gold with Last Tango in Halifax and Happy Valley. Now Sally Wainwright is going international • Read the text version here. Help support our independent…
Who killed the prime minister? The unsolved murder that still haunts Sweden
May 27 • 33 min
Three decades ago, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Could the discovery of new evidence finally close the case? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Blow up: how half a tonne of cocaine transformed the life of an island
May 24 • 27 min
In 2001, a smugglers’ yacht washed up in the Azores and disgorged its contents. The island of São Miguel was quickly flooded with high-grade cocaine – and nearly 20 years on, it is still feeling the effects • Read the text version here. Help support our…
How the news took over reality
May 20 • 35 min
Is engagement with current affairs key to being a good citizen? Or could an endless torrent of notifications be harming democracy as well as our wellbeing? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Into the pharaoh’s chamber: how I fell in love with ancient Egypt
May 17 • 36 min
Amid the convulsions in the years following the Arab Spring, Peter Hessler went to the ancient city of Amarna, site of another short-lived attempt to remake a nation • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Busting the myth that depression doesn’t affect people in poor countries
May 13 • 35 min
For decades, many psychiatrists believed depression was a uniquely western phenomenon. But in the last few years, a new movement has turned this thinking on its head • Warning: this article contains discussion of suicide • Read the text version here. Help…
The shocking rape trial that galvanised Spain’s feminists and the far right
May 10 • 43 min
The ‘wolf pack’ case inspired widespread anger and protests against sexual assault laws in Spain. But the anti-feminist backlash that followed has helped propel the far right to its biggest gains since Franco. • Warning: this episode contains strong…
Hand dryers v paper towels: the surprisingly dirty fight for the right to dry your hands
May 6 • 38 min
For a century, the humble paper towel has dominated public toilets. But a new generation of hand dryers has sparked a war for loo supremacy • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
How to identify a body: the Marchioness disaster and my life in forensic pathology
May 3 • 26 min
In my career, I have investigated many of the UK’s worst disasters. Few cases were as harrowing as the sinking of the Marchioness in 1989, which left scores dead and almost impossible to identify • Warning: this piece contains graphic descriptions of dead…
‘For five years we dreaded every meal’: my infant son’s struggle with food
Apr 26 • 47 min
After her son was born prematurely, Tahmima Anam thought the worst was behind her. But when he was allowed to come home two months later, a new problem emerged: he refused to eat • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
China’s hi-tech war on its Muslim minority
Apr 22 • 27 min
Smartphones and the internet gave the Uighurs a sense of their own identity – but now the Chinese state is using technology to strip them of it Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
‘It’s genuine, you know?’: why the online influencer industry is going ‘authentic’
Apr 19 • 43 min
Calamities such as Fyre festival have tarnished the booming business of YouTube and Instagram stars. Now the industry’s top tastemakers have a new plan: keeping it real Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Can we stop AI outsmarting humanity?
Apr 15 • 21 min
The spectre of superintelligent machines doing us harm is not just science fiction, technologists say – so how can we ensure AI remains ‘friendly’ to its makers? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Smart talking: are our devices threatening our privacy?
Apr 12 • 23 min
Millions of us now have virtual assistants, in our homes and our pockets. Even children’s toys are getting smart. But when we talk to them, who is listening? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Can the world quench China’s bottomless thirst for milk?
Apr 8 • 37 min
China’s leaders have championed milk as the emblem of a modern, affluent society – but their radical plan to triple the nation’s consumption will have a huge environmental cost • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Why Israel is quietly cosying up to Gulf monarchies
Apr 5 • 39 min
After decades of hostility, a shared hatred of Iran – and a mutual fondness for Trump – is bringing Israel’s secret links with Gulf kingdoms out into the open • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Dirty lies: how the car industry hid the truth about diesel emissions
Apr 3 • 26 min
The ‘Dieselgate’ scandal was suppressed for years – while we should have been driving electric cars • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
How to move a masterpiece: the secret business of shipping priceless artworks
Apr 1 • 34 min
What happens when a forklift goes through your Picasso? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
What animals can teach us about politics
Mar 25 • 28 min
Decades of studying primates has convinced me that animal politics are not so different from our own – and even in the wild, leadership is about much more than being a bully • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
How violent American vigilantes at the border led to Trump’s wall
Mar 22 • 41 min
From the 80s onwards, the borderlands were rife with paramilitary cruelty and racism. But the president’s rhetoric has thrown fuel on the fire • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The Aldi effect: how one discount supermarket transformed the way Britain shops
Mar 18 • 44 min
When Aldi arrived in Britain, Tesco and Sainsbury’s were sure they had nothing to worry about. Three decades later, they know better • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Concrete: the most destructive material on Earth
Mar 15 • 32 min
After water, concrete is the most widely used substance on the planet. But its benefits mask enormous dangers to human health – and to culture itself Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
Spain’s Watergate: inside the corruption scandal that changed a nation
Mar 11 • 42 min
The Gürtel case began with one Madrid mogul. Over the next decade, it grew into the biggest corruption investigation in Spain’s recent history, sweeping up hundreds of corrupt politicians and businessmen – and shattering its political system • Read the…
How the world got hooked on palm oil
Mar 8 • 34 min
It’s the miracle ingredient in everything from biscuits to shampoo. But our dependence on palm oil has devastating environmental consequences. Is it too late to break the habit? • Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
How the US has hidden its empire
Mar 4 • 24 min
The United States likes to think of itself as a republic, but it holds territories all over the world – the map you always see doesn’t tell the whole story Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
How a Slovakian neo-Nazi got elected
Mar 1 • 51 min
In 2013, the far-right politician Marian Kotleba won a shock victory in regional elections. Four years later, he was voted out in a landslide. But now he’s running for president Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a…
The battle for the future of Stonehenge
Feb 25 • 35 min
Britain’s favourite monument is stuck in the middle of a bad-tempered row over road traffic Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
The class pay gap: why it pays to be privileged
Feb 22 • 23 min
Within Britain’s elite occupations, the advantages of class are still mistaken for talent Read the text version here. Help support our independent journalism at <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/longreadpod">theguardian.com/longreadpod</a>
Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the ‘pencil towers’ of New York’s super-rich
Feb 18 • 25 min
An extreme concentration of wealth in a city where even the air is for sale has produced a new breed of needle-like tower • Read the text version here
The Money Saving Expert: how Martin Lewis became the most trusted man in Britain
Feb 15 • 33 min
He has built a multimillion pound empire, and is driven to help people attain ‘financial justice’. But in an age of predatory capitalism and rampant inequality, can one man’s modest suggestions really make a difference? • Read the text version here
White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks
Feb 11 • 32 min
How wellness upstarts spoiled milk’s healthy reputation – and built a billion-dollar industry from juicing oats and nuts • Read the text version here
How a deluge of money nearly broke the Premier League
Feb 8 • 27 min
It’s the world’s most lucrative football league. But a civil war over all that money almost toppled it • Read the text version here
Rwanda’s Khashoggi: who killed the exiled spy chief?
Feb 4 • 40 min
Dissident Patrick Karegeya had fled to South Africa, but was murdered in a well-planned attack. Now an inquest into his death threatens to bring unwelcome attention to Rwanda’s feted leader • Read the text version here
Death on demand: has euthanasia gone too far?
Feb 1 • 36 min
Countries around the world are making it easier to choose the time and manner of your death. But doctors in the world’s euthanasia capital are starting to worry about the consequences • Read the text version here
When the ice melts: the catastrophe of vanishing glaciers
Jan 28 • 28 min
As global temperatures rise, shrivelling glaciers and thawing permafrost threaten yet more climate disruption. How should we confront what is happening to our world? • Read the text version here
‘We the people’: the battle to define populism
Jan 25 • 40 min
The noisy dispute over the meaning of populism is more than just an academic squabble – it’s a crucial argument about what we expect from democracy • Read the text version here
Protein mania: the rich world’s new diet obsession
Jan 21 • 30 min
Why we can’t get enough when we already eat too much • Read the text version here
Why exercise alone won’t save us
Jan 18 • 24 min
Sedentary lifestyles are killing us – we need to build activity into our everyday lives, not just leave it for the gym • Read the text version here
Inside China’s audacious global propaganda campaign
Jan 14 • 45 min
Beijing is buying up media outlets and training scores of foreign journalists to ‘tell China’s story well’ – as part of a worldwide propaganda campaign of astonishing scope and ambition • Read the text version here
‘A torrent of ghastly revelations’: what military service taught me about America
Jan 11 • 27 min
Training on a base in California, and later serving in Afghanistan, made me confront the reality of American empire, and the injustice that pervades society at home • Read the text version here
How the murders of two elderly Jewish women shook France
Jan 7 • 47 min
Two killings in Paris, one year apart, have inflamed the bitter French debate over antisemitism, race and religion • Read the text version here
Forever prisoners: were a father and son wrongly ensnared by America’s war on terror?
Jan 4 • 44 min
Saifullah Paracha, the oldest prisoner in Guantánamo Bay, will probably die in detention without ever being charged. His son is currently in a US prison. Both have been in custody for almost 15 years, accused of aiding al-Qaida. But did they? • Read the…
Invasion of the ‘frankenbees’: the danger of building a better bee
Dec 31, 2018 • 31 min
Beekeepers are sounding the alarm about the latest developments in genetically modified pollinators • Read the text version here
Discover the Familiar: The plastic backlash
Dec 27, 2018 • 40 min
Decades after it became part of the fabric of our lives, a worldwide revolt against plastic is under way • Read the text version here
Discover the Familiar: Yes, bacon really is killing us
Dec 25, 2018 • 37 min
Decades’ worth of research proves that chemicals used to make bacon do cause cancer. So how did the meat industry convince us it was safe? • Read the text version here
Discover the Familiar: The Spectacular Power of Big Lens
Dec 24, 2018 • 49 min
How one giant company will dominate the way the whole world sees. Read the text version here
How the ‘rugby rape trial’ divided Ireland
Dec 21, 2018 • 42 min
After a trial that dominated the news, the accused were all found not guilty. But the case had tapped into a deeper rage that has not died down • Read the text version here
Bowel movement: the push to change the way you poo
Dec 17, 2018 • 28 min
Are you sitting comfortably? Many people are not – and they insist that the way we’ve been going to the toilet is all wrong • Read the text version here
Why we stopped trusting elites
Dec 14, 2018 • 36 min
The credibility of establishment figures has been demolished by technological change and political upheavals. But it’s too late to turn back the clock • Read the text version here
Field of dreams: heartbreak and heroics at the World Ploughing Championships
Dec 10, 2018 • 33 min
Some compare it to snooker, others to figure skating. But for those who have given their lives to competitive ploughing, it’s more than a sport, it’s a way of life • Read the text version here
Organised crime in the UK is bigger than ever before. Can the police catch up?
Dec 7, 2018 • 31 min
Faced with new threats from international gangsters, the boss of the National Crime Agency, Lynne Owens, thinks UK policing needs a radical reboot • Read the text version here
The making of an opioid epidemic
Dec 3, 2018 • 27 min
When high doses of painkillers led to widespread addiction, it was called one of the biggest mistakes in modern medicine. But this was no accident • Read the text version here
Terrorists, cultists – or champions of Iranian democracy? The wild wild story of the MEK
Nov 30, 2018 • 44 min
They fought for the Iranian revolution – and then for Saddam Hussein. The US and UK once condemned them. But now their opposition to Tehran has made them favourites of Trump White House hardliners • Read the text version here
The plastic backlash: what’s behind our sudden rage – and will it make a difference?
Nov 26, 2018 • 39 min
Decades after it became part of the fabric of our lives, a worldwide revolt against plastic is under way • Read the text version here
The paranoid fantasy behind Brexit
Nov 23, 2018 • 31 min
In the dark imagination of English reactionaries, Britain is always a defeated nation – and the EU is the imaginary invader • Read the text version here
Inside the booming business of background music
Nov 19, 2018 • 29 min
Once derided, the successors to muzak have grown more sophisticated – and influential – than any of us realise • Read the text version here
‘A wall built to keep people out’: the cruel, bureaucratic maze of children’s services
Nov 16, 2018 • 33 min
In a system cut to the bone, gaining access to the support we had been promised for our daughter’s special educational needs was an exhausting, soul-sapping battle • Read the text version here
About time: why western philosophy can only teach us so much
Nov 12, 2018 • 21 min
By gaining greater knowledge of how others think, we can become less certain of the knowledge we think we have, which is always the first step to greater understanding Read the text version
Dulwich Hamlet: the improbable tale of a tiny football club that lost its home to developers, and won it back
Nov 9, 2018 • 46 min
After they were locked out of their own stadium, an unlikely band of supporters came together to save the club Read the text version
Tommy Robinson and the far right’s new playbook
Nov 5, 2018 • 38 min
The former EDL leader is one of a new breed of entrepreneurial activists who are bringing extremist myths into the mainstream – while also claiming they are being silenced • Read the text version here
Shrinking the world: why we can’t resist model villages
Nov 2, 2018 • 28 min
In these baffling times, the only way to gain control of our environment is to miniaturise it Read the text version
Could populism actually be good for democracy?
Oct 29, 2018 • 31 min
A wave of populist revolts has led many to lose faith in the wisdom of people power. But such eruptions are essential to the vitality of modern politics • Read the text version here
One man’s (very polite) fight against media Islamophobia
Oct 26, 2018 • 38 min
For three years, Miqdaad Versi has waged a quixotic – and always scrupulously courteous – campaign against the endless errors and distortions in news about British Muslims. But can a thousand polite complaints make a difference? • Read the text version…
The myth of the she-devil: why we judge female criminals more harshly
Oct 22, 2018 • 32 min
A man who kills is a murderer, but a woman guilty of violent crime becomes a proxy for all that is evil. Helena Kennedy, who once represented Myra Hindley, asks why • Read the text version here
Will Nissan stay once Britain leaves? How one factory explains the Brexit business dilemma
Oct 19, 2018 • 32 min
In the 1980s, Thatcher’s government sold Britain as ‘a gateway to Europe’. Nissan came to Sunderland and thrived – but now its future is uncertain • Read the text version here
The death of consensus: how conflict came back to politics
Oct 15, 2018 • 37 min
New Labour’s ‘third way’ promised to end the clash between left and right. But did the fantasy of politics without strife create our age of anger? • Read the text version here
How Robyn transformed pop
Oct 12, 2018 • 38 min
After almost a decade away, Robyn is about to release a new album. Laura Snapes examines her seismic cultural impact Read the text version here
‘This guy doesn’t know anything’: the inside story of Trump’s shambolic transition team
Oct 8, 2018 • 28 min
Michael Lewis, author of Moneyball and The Big Short, reveals how Trump’s bungled presidential transition set the template for his time in the White House • Read the text version here
The business of voluntourism: do western do-gooders actually do harm?
Oct 5, 2018 • 38 min
A holiday helping out in an orphanage can be a rewarding experience. But voluntourism supports a system that is breaking up families • Read the text version here
Finally, a cure for insomnia?
Oct 1, 2018 • 34 min
We are living through an epidemic of sleeplessness, but the medical establishment has largely ignored the problem. Can a radical new therapy help you get some sleep? Read the text version here
A giant crawling brain: the jaw-dropping world of termites
Sep 28, 2018 • 32 min
At least half of termite studies used to be about how to kill them. But science is discovering their extraordinary usefulness Read the text version here
The real Goldfinger: the London banker who broke the world
Sep 24, 2018 • 29 min
The true story of how the City of London invented offshore banking – and set the rich free Read the text version here
‘Human impulses run riot’: China’s shocking pace of change
Sep 21, 2018 • 26 min
Thirty years ago, politics was paramount. Now, only money counts. China’s leading novelist examines a nation that has transformed in a single lifetime Read the text version here
Is compassion fatigue inevitable in an age of 24-hour news?
Sep 17, 2018 • 31 min
We have never been more aware of the appalling events that occur around the world every day. But in the face of so much horror, is there a danger that we become numb to the headlines – and does it matter if we do? Read the text version here
The end of Atlanticism: has Trump killed the ideology that won the cold war?
Sep 14, 2018 • 33 min
The foreign policy establishment has been lamenting its death for half a century. But Atlanticism has long been a convenient myth Read the text version here
How to be human: the man who was raised by wolves
Sep 10, 2018 • 30 min
Abandoned as a child, Marcos Rodríguez Pantoja survived alone in the wild for 15 years. But living with people proved to be even more difficult Read the text version here
The only way to end the class divide: the case for abolishing private schools
Sep 7, 2018 • 23 min
The gap between state and private education is reinforcing privilege and harming the prospects of another generation. The only solution is integration Read the text version here
Denialism: what drives people to reject the truth
Sep 3, 2018 • 33 min
From vaccines to climate change to genocide, a new age of denialism is upon us. Why have we failed to understand it? • Read the text version here
How TripAdvisor changed travel
Aug 31, 2018 • 39 min
The world’s biggest travel site has turned the industry upside down – but now it is struggling to deal with the same kinds of problems that are vexing other tech giants like Facebook, Google and Twitter • Read the text version here
BDS: how a controversial non-violent movement has transformed the Israeli-Palestinian debate
Aug 24, 2018 • 70 min
Israel sees the international boycott campaign as an existential threat to the Jewish state. Palestinians regard it as their last resort • Read the text version here
How Matteo Salvini pulled Italy to the far right
Aug 20, 2018 • 33 min
After years on the fringes of Italian politics, the populist leader of the Lega has stoked anti-immigrant panic and barged into power • Read the text version here
‘My death is not my own’: the limits of legal euthanasia
Aug 17, 2018 • 25 min
Henk Blanken knows Parkinson’s disease might one day take him past the point at which he wants to carry on. Dutch law says it is legal for a doctor to help him die when the time comes – but there’s no guarantee that will happen • Read the text version here
Behemoth, bully, thief: how the English language is taking over the planet
Aug 13, 2018 • 34 min
No language in history has dominated the world quite like English does today. Is there any point in resisting? • Read the text version here
The free speech panic: how the right concocted a crisis
Aug 10, 2018 • 37 min
Snowflake students have become the target of a new rightwing crusade. But exaggerated claims of censorship reveal a deeper anxiety at the core of modern conservatism • Read the text version here
How to Spend It: the shopping list for the 1%
Aug 6, 2018 • 35 min
In an age of astonishing wealth, nothing reveals the lives of the ultra-rich like the FT’s unashamedly ostentatious luxury magazine • Read the text version here
The ugly scandal that cancelled the Nobel prize
Aug 3, 2018 • 30 min
Sweden’s literary elite has been thrown into disarray by allegations of sexual harassment and corruption • Read the text version here
Nevis: how the world’s most secretive offshore haven refuses to clean up
Jul 30, 2018 • 35 min
The years since 2008 have seen a global crackdown on offshore finance. Yet a few places have doubled down on offering secrecy to the super-rich. Among these, one tiny Caribbean island might be the worst offender • Read the text version here
The bitter conflict over Poland’s communist history
Jul 27, 2018 • 41 min
Many Poles remember Soviet soldiers saving them from Nazi occupation. But a growing number are rejecting that narrative, and the monuments that come with it Read the text version here
‘We believed we could remake ourselves any way we liked’: how the 1990s shaped #MeToo
Jul 23, 2018 • 35 min
While promising liberation and endless possibility, the culture of the decade drove us relentlessly in pursuit of perfection • Read the text version here
‘Nothing to worry about. The water is fine’: how Flint poisoned its people
Jul 20, 2018 • 35 min
When the people of Flint, Michigan, complained that their tap water smelled bad and made children sick, it took officials 18 months to accept there was a problem • Read the text version here
The age of patriarchy: how an unfashionable idea became a rallying cry for feminism today
Jul 16, 2018 • 34 min
A term that was derided and abandoned a decade ago has come roaring back to life • Read the text version here
Why we may never know if British troops committed war crimes in Iraq
Jul 13, 2018 • 42 min
The Iraq Historic Allegations Team was set up by the government to investigate claims of the abuse of civilians. After its collapse, some fear the truth will never come out • Read the text version here
The radical lessons of a year reporting on knife crime
Jul 6, 2018 • 42 min
At the end of our award-winning series Beyond the Blade, it’s clear that fixing the problem will require political will and a dramatic new approach. But our politicians are still reacting to tabloid headlines instead of facts • Read the text version here
How to spot a perfect fake: the world’s top art forgery detective
Jul 2, 2018 • 43 min
Forgeries have got so good – and so costly – that Sotheby’s has brought in its own in-house fraud-busting expert • Read text version here
How the resurgence of white supremacy in US sparked free speech war
Jun 29, 2018 • 42 min
With neo-Nazis marching in American cities, the national faith in absolute free expression is breaking down – even inside the organisation sworn to defend it, the ACLU • Read the text version here
Five myths about the refugee crisis
Jun 25, 2018 • 28 min
The cameras have gone – but the suffering endures. Daniel Trilling deconstructs the beliefs that still shape policy and public opinion • Read the text version here
How Britain let Russia hide its dirty money
Jun 22, 2018 • 31 min
For decades, politicians have welcomed the super-rich with open arms. Now they’re finally having second thoughts. But is it too late? • Read the text version here
When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity?
Jun 15, 2018 • 32 min
After the abolition of slavery, Britain paid millions in compensation – but every penny of it went to slave owners, and nothing to those they enslaved. We must stop overlooking the brutality of British history • Read the text version here
Has wine gone bad?
Jun 11, 2018 • 37 min
‘Natural wine’ advocates say everything about the modern industry is ethically, ecologically and aesthetically wrong – and have triggered the biggest split in the wine world for a generation • Read the text version here
How to topple a dictator: the rebel plot that freed the Gambia
Jun 8, 2018 • 36 min
After 22 years, Yahya Jammeh seemed unassailable. His brutal and reckless rule was finally ended by a small but courageous resistance • Read the text version here
How #MeToo revealed the central rift within feminism today
Jun 4, 2018 • 26 min
It’s not a generational divide, but rather a split between two competing visions of feminism – social and individualist • Read the text version here
Why Silicon Valley can’t fix itself
Jun 1, 2018 • 37 min
Tech insiders have finally started admitting their mistakes – but the solutions they are offering could just help the big players get even more powerful Read the text version here
The spectacular power of Big Lens
May 25, 2018 • 48 min
How one giant company will dominate the way the whole world sees • Read the text version here
Why we should bulldoze the business school
May 21, 2018 • 22 min
There are 13,000 business schools on Earth. That’s 13,000 too many. And I should know – I’ve taught in them for 20 years • Read the text version here
From Game of Thrones to The Crown: the woman who turns actors into stars
May 18, 2018 • 36 min
Nina Gold’s role is invisible, and yet her taste has shaped much of what we watch on film and TV • Read the text version here
Fake it till you make it: meet the wolves of Instagram
May 14, 2018 • 28 min
Their hero is Jordan Belfort, their social media feeds display super-rich lifestyles. But what are these self-styled traders really selling? • Read the text version here
The rise of Russia’s neo-Nazi football hooligans
May 11, 2018 • 32 min
For the past two decades the Russian state has encouraged groups of violent far-right fans. As the World Cup approaches, it is struggling to tame them • Read the text version here
How babies learn, and why robots can’t compete
May 7, 2018 • 27 min
If we could understand how the infant mind develops, it might help every child reach their full potential. But seeing them as learning machines is not the answer • Read the text version here
Yanis Varoufakis: Marx predicted our present crisis, and points the way out
May 4, 2018 • 27 min
The Communist Manifesto foresaw the predatory and polarised global capitalism of the 21st century. But Marx and Engels also showed us that we have the power to create a better world • Read the text version here
How to get rich quick in Silicon Valley
Apr 30, 2018 • 32 min
Corey Pein took his half-baked startup idea to America’s hottest billionaire factory – and found a wasteland of techie hustlers and con men • Read the text version here
How much is an hour worth? The war over the minimum wage
Apr 27, 2018 • 41 min
Some economists say it should be raised. Others say it’s already too high. But what if both sides are missing the point? Read the text version here
The murder that shook Iceland
Apr 20, 2018 • 32 min
In a country with one of the lowest murder rates in the world, the killing of a 20-year-old woman upended the nation’s sense of itself Read the text version here
Homaro Cantu, the genius chef who wanted to change the world
Apr 16, 2018 • 29 min
How a homeless child grew up to become the most inventive chef in history • Read the text version here
Two minutes to midnight: did the US miss its chance to stop North Korea’s nuclear programme?
Apr 13, 2018 • 34 min
An unprecedented US mission to Pyongyang in 1999 promised to defuse Kim’s nuclear threat. But it all came to nothing – and then the hawks took power • Read the text version here
Why I’m suing over my dream internship
Apr 6, 2018 • 29 min
It’s time to end a system that excludes the less privileged from the arts, media and politics • Read the text version here
Perfect prams for perfect parents: the rise of the bougie buggy
Mar 30, 2018 • 26 min
How the rise of the luxury pram capitalised on the status anxiety of a new generation of parents • Read the text version here
Why Silicon Valley billionaires are prepping for the apocalypse in New Zealand
Mar 26, 2018 • 38 min
How an extreme libertarian tract predicting the collapse of liberal democracies – written by Jacob Rees-Mogg’s father – inspired the likes of Peter Thiel to buy up property across the Pacific • Read the text version here
How many murders can a police informer get away with?
Mar 23, 2018 • 38 min
Last year Northern Irish paramilitary Gary Haggarty pleaded guilty to hundreds of violent crimes, including many killings – while working for the British state • Read the text version here
The male glance: how we fail to take women’s stories seriously
Mar 19, 2018 • 27 min
Male art is epic, universal, and profoundly meaningful. Women’s creations are domestic, emotional and trivial. How did we learn to misread stories so badly? • Read the text version here
Inside the OED: can the world’s biggest dictionary survive the internet?
Mar 16, 2018 • 31 min
For centuries, lexicographers have attempted to capture the entire English language. Technology might soon turn this dream into reality – but will it spell the end for dictionaries? • Read the text version here
Yes, bacon really is killing us
Mar 12, 2018 • 36 min
Decades’ worth of research proves that chemicals used to make bacon do cause cancer. So how did the meat industry convince us it was safe? • Read the text version here
The fascist movement that has brought Mussolini back to the mainstream
Mar 9, 2018 • 38 min
Italy’s CasaPound has been essential to the normalisation of fascism again in the country of its birth • Read the text version here
‘I could hear things, and I could feel terrible pain’: when anaesthesia fails
Mar 5, 2018 • 30 min
Anaesthesia remains a mysterious and inexact science – and thousands of patients still wake up on the operating table every year. • Read the text version here
The brutal world of sheep fighting: the illegal sport beloved by Algeria’s ‘lost generation’
Mar 2, 2018 • 38 min
For millions of Algerians, life has been shaped by years of conflict, unemployment and state repression. Sheep fighting offers an arena where young men can escape the constant supervision of the state. • Read the text version here
The fight for the right to be a Muslim in America
Feb 26, 2018 • 52 min
A bitter legal row over a mosque in an affluent New Jersey town shows the new face of Islamophobia in the age of Trump Read the text version here
Searching for an Alzheimer’s cure while my father slips away
Feb 23, 2018 • 31 min
At the beginning, we hunted frantically for any medical breakthrough that might hint at a cure. Then hope gave way to the unbearable truth Read the text version here
Talk is cheap: the myth of the focus group
Feb 19, 2018 • 26 min
Focus groups make us feel our views matter – but no one with power cares what we think Read the text version here
Murder in Hampstead: did a secret trial put the wrong man in jail?
Feb 16, 2018 • 26 min
New evidence shows that an MI6 informant convicted of a notorious murder may be innocent, but due to a gagging order, his case cannot be heard • Read the text version here
The cult of Mary Beard
Feb 9, 2018 • 40 min
How a late-blossoming classics don became Britain’s most beloved intellectual Read the text version here
Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs
Feb 5, 2018 • 33 min
Work has ruled our lives for centuries, and it does so today more than ever. But a new generation of thinkers insists there is an alternative • Read the text version here
The diabolical genius of the baby advice industry
Feb 2, 2018 • 32 min
Every baffled new parent goes searching for answers in baby manuals. But what they really offer is the reassuring fantasy that life’s most difficult questions have one right answer • Read the text version here
How a new technology is changing the lives of people who cannot speak
Jan 29, 2018 • 34 min
Millions are robbed of the power of speech by illness, injury or lifelong conditions. Can the creation of bespoke digital voices transform their ability to communicate? • Read the text version here
The YouTube star who fought back against revenge porn and won
Jan 26, 2018 • 42 min
Four years after her ex posted explicit videos filmed without her consent, Chrissy Chambers talks about the gruelling legal battle that nearly destroyed her • Read the text version here
How I let drinking take over my life
Jan 22, 2018 • 25 min
Five years after his last taste of alcohol, William Leith tries to understand its powerful magic • Read the text version here
How the sandwich consumed Britain
Jan 19, 2018 • 37 min
The world-beating British sandwich industry is worth £8bn a year. It transformed the way we eat lunch, then did the same for breakfast – and now it’s coming for dinner • Read the text version here
‘A tale of decay’: the Houses of Parliament are falling down
Jan 15, 2018 • 31 min
As politicians dither over repairs, the risk of fire, flood or a deluge of sewage only increases. But fixing the Palace of Westminster might change British politics for good – which is the last thing many of its residents want • Read the text version here
‘A different dimension of loss’: inside the great insect die-off
Jan 9, 2018 • 27 min
Scientists have identified 2 million species of living things. No one knows how many more are out there, and tens of thousands may be vanishing before we have even had a chance to encounter them • Read the text version here
Manchester City’s plan for global domination
Jan 5, 2018 • 33 min
Football has already been transformed by big money – but the businessmen behind Man City are trying to build a global corporation that will change the game for ever • Read the text version here
‘We believe you harmed your child’: the war over shaken baby convictions
Dec 29, 2017 • 43 min
Expert witnesses who claim parents have been wrongly accused have been vilified and struck off. But the science is anything but certain. What happens to the truth when experts can’t agree? • Read the text version here
From inboxing to thought showers: how business bullshit took over
Dec 22, 2017 • 25 min
Vacuous management-speak is easily laughed off – but is there a real cost to talking rubbish? • Read the text version here
After the liberation of Mosul, an orgy of killing
Dec 15, 2017 • 57 min
In the dying days of the battle of Mosul, Ghaith Abdul-Ahad followed Iraqi soldiers during the last push against Isis. But following their victory, a new wave of savagery was unleashed • Read the text version here
A mission for journalism in a time of crisis
Dec 8, 2017 • 43 min
In a turbulent era, the media must define its values and principles, writes Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner • Read the text version here
How Trump walked into Putin’s web
Dec 4, 2017 • 39 min
The inside story of how a former British spy was hired to investigate Russia’s influence on Trump – and uncovered explosive evidence that Moscow had been cultivating Trump for years • Read the text version here
How Britain did Gaddafi’s dirty work
Dec 1, 2017 • 37 min
Secret papers show how far MI6 went to please Libya’s ruthless intelligence agents – including helping to kidnap the dictator’s enemies • Read the text version here
How to sell a country: the booming business of nation branding
Nov 24, 2017 • 40 min
These days, every place in the world wants to market its unique identity – and an industry has sprung up to help put them on the map • Read the text version here
How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the first world war
Nov 20, 2017 • 36 min
The Great War is often depicted as an unexpected catastrophe. But for millions who had been living under imperialist rule, terror and degradation were nothing new • Read the text version here
The wilderness years: how Labour’s left survived to conquer
Nov 17, 2017 • 41 min
Corbyn, Abbott and McDonnell were long dismissed as irrelevant radicals. But their formative years on the margins were more important than anyone realised. By Andy Beckett • Read the text version here
Coders of the world, unite: can Silicon Valley workers curb the power of Big Tech?
Nov 13, 2017 • 42 min
For decades, tech companies promised to make the world better. As that dream falls apart, disillusioned insiders are trying to take back control • Read the text version here
‘Reality shrivels. This is your life now’: 88 days trapped in bed to save a pregnancy
Nov 10, 2017 • 34 min
Months before she was due to give birth, disaster struck for Katherine Heiny. Doctors ordered her to lie on her side in bed and not move – and gave her a 1% chance of carrying her baby to term • Read the text version here
The war against Pope Francis
Nov 6, 2017 • 33 min
His modesty and humility have made him a popular figure around the world. But inside the church, his reforms have infuriated conservatives and sparked a revolt • Read the text version here
Orbiting Jupiter: my week with Emmanuel Macron
Nov 3, 2017 • 37 min
Is France’s new president a political miracle, or a mirage that is already fading away? • Read the text version here
The scientists persuading terrorists to spill their secrets
Oct 30, 2017 • 40 min
Expert interrogators know torture doesn’t work – but until now, nobody could prove it. By analysing hundreds of top-secret interviews with terror suspects, two British scientists have revolutionised the art of extracting the truth • Read the text version…
Why can’t we cure the common cold?
Oct 27, 2017 • 32 min
After thousands of years of failure, some scientists believe a breakthrough might finally be in sight • Read the text version here
The science of spying: how the CIA secretly recruits academics
Oct 23, 2017 • 25 min
In order to tempt nuclear scientists from countries such as Iran or North Korea to defect, US spy agencies routinely send agents to academic conferences – or even host their own fake ones • Read the text version here
We should have seen Trump coming
Oct 20, 2017 • 23 min
Obama’s rise felt like a new chapter in American history. But the original sin of white supremacy was not so easily erased • Read the text version here