Mongabay Newscast

Mongabay Newscast

mongabay.libsyn.com/podcast
News and information from nature’s frontline


Deep sea diva: A dive to the ocean floor with biologist Diva Amon
Oct 16 • 28 min
Plans for ocean floor mining are moving forward globally — especially around thermal vents that create deposits of metals like gold, silver, copper, manganese, cobalt, and zinc — but humans have explored less than 1% of the deep sea, so it’s fair…
Hitting the highway in Borneo to assess diversity and development
Oct 1 • 33 min
Mongabay’s adventurous Middle East-based staff writer John Cannon just traveled the length of the Pan Borneo Highway and shares what he discovered on the journey about biodiversity, development, and the natural future of this, the world’s 3rd largest…
Are humpback whale groups sharing their songs?
Sep 12 • 30 min
For this episode we speak with Jim Darling, a marine biologist whose team found that the songs of different humpback whale groups can be so similar to each other that the conventional wisdom of these being distinct groups might be wrong. These…
“I’m excited!” Climate action star Rev Yearwood on the UN, youth and women’s leadership & more
Sep 4 • 42 min
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Reverend Lennox Yearwood about the upcoming UN Climate Summit in New York City and what it’s going to take to pass legislation and policies that can effectively tackle the enormity of the…
Return of the amazing superb lyrebird
Aug 13 • 33 min
For an encore edition during this show’s brief hiatus, we replay one of our most popular Field Notes interviews of all time, featuring Australian researcher Anastasia Dalziell who’s doing trailblazing work with superb lyrebirds. Listen to…
Baltimore, urban rats, and environmental justice
Aug 6 • 30 min
Urban pests like rats have been in the news due to the US President calling Baltimore “rat and rodent infested.” He isn’t the first American politician to use this kind of rhetoric to demean communities that are predominantly made up of people…
Celebrated author David Quammen on inspiring ecological restoration, evolutionary science, and more
Jul 23 • 44 min
David Quammen is an award-winning science writer, author, and journalist covering some of the most promising trends in conservation and evolutionary science. We invited him on the show to discuss his recent feature for National Geographic, where he is a…
Right whales discovered singing for the first time: new recordings
Jul 9 • 21 min
Jessica Crance is a research biologist with NOAA who recently discovered right whales singing for the first time. While some whales like humpbacks and bowheads are known for their melodious songs, none of the three species of right whale has ever been…
New CITES boss discusses reining in online wildlife trafficking, the next COP, and more
Jun 25 • 54 min
We speak with Ivonne Higuero, new Secretary General of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The first woman to ever serve in the role, we discuss how her background as an environmental economist…
Zoos are more key to conservation than ever, Bronx Zoo director says
Jun 12 • 32 min
Jim Breheny is the director of the Bronx Zoo in New York City and joins us to discuss the contributions zoos make to global biodiversity conservation. While many question the relevance of zoos in the 21st century, he argues that as humanity’s influence…
What can talkative river dolphins teach us about their marine relatives?
May 28 • 27 min
Gabriel Melo-Santos studies Araguaian river dolphins in Brazil, and his work has revealed that the species is much chattier than we’d previously known, and could potentially help us better understand the evolution of underwater communication in marine…
How to discover an untouched rainforest
May 14 • 34 min
Ecologist Julian Bayliss used satellite imagery, drones, and technical climbing to make a big discovery, an untouched rainforest atop a mountain in Mozambique that contains species new to science. On this episode Bayliss discusses the novel species of…
Paying for healthcare with a healthy rainforest
Apr 30 • 35 min
Kinari Webb founded Health in Harmony, which provides healthcare to people to save Indonesian rainforests: she realized that most illegal deforestation happens when villagers have to pay for medical care, because all they have to generate cash with is…
Unusual tool-using chimp culture discovered in the Congo
Apr 16 • 29 min
New findings by primatologist Cleve Hicks reveal an entirely new tool kit used by a group of chimps who also build ground nests, which is highly unusual, but especially for ones living around dangerous predators like lions and leopards. But these chimps’…
Sloths’ amazing survival skills create a challenge for their survival
Apr 2 • 23 min
Dr. Rebecca Cliffe joins us to bust myths about sloths like the idea that they are lazy creatures: moving slowly is actually a strategy that has been so successful that sloths are some of the oldest mammals on Earth. But she also warns of a crisis driven…
Studying secretive humpback dolphins through sound
Mar 19 • 18 min
How do you study a marine mammal that lives in waters so murky that it can hide from you in plain sight, even in shallow water? We speak with marine biologist Isha Bopardikar who’s using bioacoustics to unlock hidden behaviors of humpback dolphins on the…
Amazon explorer Scott Wallace: Uncontacted indigenous peoples are a true treasure
Mar 5 • 30 min
National Geographic writer and author Scott Wallace’s latest book covers an expedition into remote forests to gather information about the uncontacted “Arrow People” in order to protect them from the ever-advancing arc of Amazonian deforestation. He joins…
How sound can save a rare bird with an AI assist
Feb 20 • 19 min
On this episode we speak with the lead author of a new study using bioacoustics and artificial intelligence to track a very rare New Zealand bird. We play some recordings of the beautiful hihi bird that illustrate the success of a last ditch…
Good news from Mexico monarch reserve despite looming threats
Feb 5 • 24 min
On this episode we’re joined by Mongabay’s Mexico City-based contributor Martha Pskowski who recently traveled to central Mexico during the winter ‘high season’ when tourists flock to see monarch butterflies covering the trees. While the number of…
We need nature more than nature needs us: IUCN’s Inger Andersen
Jan 23 • 38 min
The IUCN is best known for its Red List of Threatened Species, but it does much more than that, says Inger Andersen, the organization’s director general, in this episode. She shares insights about how the Red List is built, the key role of women in…
Sound can save forests and major rainforest trends to watch with Mongabay’s founder
Jan 8 • 27 min
Mongabay founder Rhett Butler discusses the biggest rainforest trends for 2019 and a major new paper he co-authored in Science that looks at how bioacoustics can monitor forests and their wildlife to safeguard conservation goals. Plus he talks about the…
How 96 rare sea turtle hatchlings survived a NY City summer
Dec 11, 2018 • 30 min
The largely untold [and very heartwarming] story of how 96 critically endangered sea turtle hatchlings survived a summer in New York City—with help from scientists and a cozy office closet! In July, Big Apple beachgoers spotted a Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle…
Bill McKibben is down on COPs but bullish on climate action
Nov 27, 2018 • 18 min
We discuss the prospects for the upcoming international climate summit (COP24 in December) with top American author and climate activist Bill McKibben. About recent developments he says, “I think meaningful action probably isn’t going to come now at the…
E.O. Wilson’s full update on his Half-Earth initiative
Nov 13, 2018 • 32 min
On this episode we share a progress report on Half-Earth, the ambitious effort to set aside half the world for nature, direct from legendary conservation biologist E.O. Wilson. In this return visit to the podcast, he discusses the project’s effort to map…
Chasing penguins, a dispatch from Antarctica
Oct 30, 2018 • 29 min
In a dispatch from Antarctica’s McMurdo Station, Dr. Michelle LaRue discusses her sixth deployment to the icy continent to document emperor penguin populations, a species that is an important indicator of the Southern Ocean’s health. Skype was down at the…
Racing to save the world’s amazing frogs
Oct 18, 2018 • 40 min
The outbreak of chytrid is probably the largest global wildlife disease event in recorded history. Our guest is an expert on the front lines fighting its spread, Dr. Jonathan Kolby of the Honduras Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Center. He discusses the…
Bats and Ebola: studying fruit bats to prevent future outbreaks
Oct 2, 2018 • 27 min
Sarah Olson is a primatologist who has lately been studying hammer-headed fruit bats to understand how Ebola is transmitted to apes and also humans — research which could potentially control or prevent outbreaks of the deadly disease, like the current one…
Getting social for science and conservation
Sep 18, 2018 • 28 min
Diogo Verissimo says social sciences can boost biodiversity conservation, and as one of the top researchers focused on adapting marketing principles for conservation, he should know. Diogo is associated with the University of Oxford and San Diego Zoo,…
‘Godfather of biodiversity’ says it’s time to manage Earth as a whole system
Sep 5, 2018 • 22 min
Dr. Thomas Lovejoy coined the term “biodiversity” in 1980 and his work since has helped establish the preservation of global biodiversity as one of the most important conservation issues of our time. We discuss this and some of the key environmental…
The amazing song skills of the superb lyrebird
Aug 21, 2018 • 36 min
Sir David Attenborough says the superb lyrebird has one of “the most elaborate, the most complex, the most beautiful song[s] in the world.” In this episode we explore the incredible ability they have to mimic predators and possums, squeaky trees and other…
Beavers, our brilliant ecosystem builders
Aug 7, 2018 • 37 min
You might not think of beavers as remarkable, but they are actually brilliant ecosystem engineers whose dams mitigate flooding, improve water quality, and boost groundwater levels, and they also provide habitat for species like salmon, moose, and mink.…
How dark money and shadow companies deforest Indonesia and derail its democracy
Jul 24, 2018 • 30 min
On this episode we explore revelations about “shadow companies” and dark money associated with the palm oil sector, and how they factor into Mongabay’s ongoing investigation into corruption fueling Indonesia’s rainforest destruction and land rights crises…
How to use drones without stressing wildlife
Jul 10, 2018 • 33 min
Drones are increasingly used by wildlife lovers and researchers, but how is that stressing animals out, and how can drone “pilots” make a meaningful contribution to science while avoiding wildlife harassment? Our guest shares best practices for drones not…
Indigenous knowledge and climate science
Jun 26, 2018 • 44 min
Indigenous knowledge and climate change is the topic of this episode: “Science has been seen as [a] colonial tool by indigenous peoples. We are trying to say that we are co-researching, and these knowledge-holders [are] scientists of their own kind.”…
What can soundscapes tell us about animals and their home landscapes?
Jun 12, 2018 • 45 min
Anne Axel of Marshall University is making the case for a new field of bioacoustics research: soundscape phenology, the study of cyclical life events of plants and animals via sound recordings. She keynotes the Ecoacoustics Congress in Australia soon on…
Mexico’s community forests find sustainability by including women and youths
May 30, 2018 • 25 min
A special report on community forestry in Mexico: “ejidos” are effective at conserving forests while creating economic opportunities, but also face threats from exclusion of women from governance, and also young people, who have left in large numbers. But…
Renowned marine biologist Sylvia Earle on acting for the oceans
May 15, 2018 • 51 min
Legendary marine biologist Sylvia Earle, sometimes called “Her Deepness,” is a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and former chief scientist at NOAA. She’s a conservation champion and argues for marine protected areas in particular: “The ocean has…
Seabird secrets revealed by bioacoustics in New Zealand
Apr 30, 2018 • 24 min
Megan Friesen is a conservation biologist using bioacoustics technology to examine the breeding behavior of a secretive Pacific seabird called Buller’s shearwater, which breeds on remote islands off of New Zealand. Friesen explains why bioacoustics…
Exploring Brazil’s biodiverse Cerrado region and the impacts of agriculture
Apr 17, 2018 • 32 min
On this episode we discuss Brazil’s incredibly biodiverse Cerrado savannah, with its 10,000 plant species, 900 kinds of birds and 300 different mammals. Long overlooked, much agriculture has moved from the rainforest to this vast region, so Mongabay sent…
Maroon 5 guitarist James Valentine on stopping illegal rainforest wood from becoming guitars
Apr 3, 2018 • 32 min
On this episode we speak with James Valentine, the multiple-Grammy-winning guitarist for Maroon 5 about his work to keep illegal and unsustainable rainforest wood out of musical instruments. He has been to the rainforests of Peru and Guatemala to see the…
Exploring our deep connection to water, plus the sounds of Sandhill crane migration
Mar 20, 2018 • 59 min
On this episode we discuss our deep connection to water with marine biologist and sea turtle researcher Wallace J. Nichols, bestselling author of Blue Mind. Then we speak with a team using bioacoustics to document the ecology of Sandhill cranes on the…
How effective is environmental restoration?
Mar 6, 2018 • 39 min
How effective is environmental restoration? On this episode, we seek answers to that question with Claire Wordley of Cambridge University, which has just debuted a much needed new project collecting the evidence, plus examples of restoration from around…
Exploring the minds and inner lives of wild animals
Feb 19, 2018 • 49 min
On this episode we speak with Sy Montgomery, an author of a new book about the amazing minds and lives of animals — their memories, how even electric eels dream, the fact that some creatures like to get drunk (and why) — and we’ll hear about Mongabay’s…
New eyes in the sky monitor Earth systems like never before
Feb 6, 2018 • 57 min
A deep dive into cutting-edge remote sensing technologies with Heinz Award-winner Greg Asner, who invented an airborne observatory that his team uses to monitor ecosystems like rainforests and coral reefs. Their laser-guided lab can even see underwater to…
David Suzuki on why indigenous knowledge is critical for humanity’s survival
Jan 23, 2018 • 68 min
On today’s episode we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki. He is is the author of more than 50 books and the host of the long-running science program The Nature of Things. He’s…
Climate lessons from indigenous peoples, plus the mysterious night parrot
Jan 9, 2018 • 46 min
On the first episode of 2018, we speak with the author of a new book about the resilience of indigenous peoples in the face of climate change, and a researcher shares recordings of Australia’s elusive night parrot. Plus we round up the recent top…
Massive Amazonian medicine encyclopedia gets an update, and Madagascar conservation efforts examined
Dec 12, 2017 • 77 min
Mongabay speaks with Christopher Herndon, a medical doctor who as co-founder and president of the group Acaté Amazon Conservation helped the indigenous Matsés people to document their traditional healing and plant knowledge in a 1,000 page encyclopedia.…
Margaret Atwood talks about birds, ecology, and her graphic novel series
Nov 28, 2017 • 42 min
Margaret Atwood joins the Mongabay Newscast to discuss her conservation-themed graphic novel series, the need for action to save birds and oceans, and much more. Then author and entrepreneur Tyler Gage joins us to discuss his business that supports…
Jane Goodall on being proven right that animals have personalities, and more
Nov 15, 2017 • 46 min
Jane Goodall joins the Mongabay Newscast to discuss the recent vindication of her long time contention that all animals have distinct personalities, and much more. Then Mongabay reporter Justin Catanoso joins us from Bonn, Germany, to discuss the news and…
Gas drilling vs wildlife in Peruvian Amazon and a Goldman Prize winner on mercury contamination
Oct 31, 2017 • 63 min
In this episode we discuss new science on the impacts on birds and amphibians of drilling for natural gas in the tropics with a Smithsonian researcher, and a Goldman Prize winner discusses her ongoing campaign to rid mercury contamination from the…
Bat calls from the Amazon plus how Indonesia’s rainforests became palm plantations
Oct 18, 2017 • 45 min
Mongabay editor Phil Jacobson joins the Newscast to discuss a new investigative reporting project called “Indonesia For Sale” about the land deals — and the powerful politicians and businessmen behind them — that have converted vast areas of Indonesian…
Javan rhino calls and an analysis of ‘green’ forest certification
Oct 3, 2017 • 49 min
On this week’s show we discuss whether forest certification schemes like Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) are actually achieving their goals. Whether they do or not has massive implications for forest conservation worldwide, and while the evidence is hard…
Legendary musician Bruce Cockburn on music, activism, and hope
Sep 19, 2017 • 53 min
This week we welcome a living legend onto the program, musician Bruce Cockburn, who is well known for his outspoken support of environmental and humanitarian causes. His career has yielded 33 records, including his latest, Bone On Bone. This week, he will…
From AI to remote sensing, tech and conservation a powerful combo
Sep 6, 2017 • 58 min
On this episode we take a look at the role technology plays in conservation efforts. First we speak with Topher White of Rainforest Connection, which deploys used cell phones in tropical forests around the world to provide real-time monitoring of…
New Madagascar mine worries locals and lemurs; plus, banjo frogs and whistling ducks in Australia
Aug 22, 2017 • 38 min
Our first guest for this edition of the Mongabay Newscast is Eddie Carver, a Mongabay contributor based in Madagascar who recently reported about a troubled company that is hoping to mine rare earth elements in Madagascar’s Ampasindava peninsula, to…
Speaking from the heart on climate change with Katherine Hayhoe
Aug 8, 2017 • 50 min
Katharine Hayhoe is an acclaimed atmospheric scientist and climate change communicator, a professor at Texas Tech University, and host of the popular web series “Global Weirding,” which tackles common questions, misconceptions, and myths around climate…
Taiwan’s natural soundscapes and a critique of the global hydropower building boom
Jul 25, 2017 • 45 min
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Sarah Bardeen, the communications director for the NGO International Rivers. Bardeen wrote a commentary for Mongabay recently after attending an international gathering of…
A wildlife DJ and a children’s book author inspiring the next generation of conservationists
Jul 12, 2017 • 54 min
Guest Ben Mirin, aka DJ Ecotone, is an explorer, wildlife DJ, educator, and television presenter who creates music from the sounds of nature to help inspire conservation efforts. He explains the art and science of his recordings and play several songs he…
Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem under threat, plus tracking bird movement in Puerto Rico
Jun 27, 2017 • 38 min
On this episode we welcome Gemma Tillack, agribusiness campaign director of the Rainforest Action Network, which has been very active in the global campaign to protect Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem, one of the richest, most biodiverse tropical…
Amazon Reef discovery discussed plus environmental journalism hits milestone in Latin America
Jun 13, 2017 • 53 min
On this episode, we welcome John Hocevar, a marine biologist and director of Greenpeace USA’s oceans campaigns. John was on the Greenpeace ship Esperanza to document the newly discovered Amazon Reef, and he talks about the uniqueness of the…
Why forests, why now? How tropical forests can survive and thrive
May 31, 2017 • 48 min
On this episode we speak with Frances Seymour, lead author of a new book Why Forests? Why Now? The Science, Economics and Politics of Tropical Forests and Climate Change, which she co-authored with Jonah Busch. Seymour argues that…
Singing seals and a discussion of the “infrastructure tsunami” sweeping the planet
May 17, 2017 • 55 min
In this episode we feature Dr. Bill Laurance of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, talking about his team’s work documenting the planetary infrastructure boom and the need for more positive, less ‘doom and gloom’ science communication,…
Deep dive into marine wildlife study with bioacoustics
May 3, 2017 • 55 min
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Leah Barclay, a sound artist, acoustic ecologist, and researcher with Griffith University in South East Queensland, Australia. We discuss the ever broadening field of acoustic ecology, the…
Eyes in the skies for forests, plus mangrove finches on the rebound
Apr 18, 2017 • 35 min
On this episode we speak with Crystal Davis, the director of Global Forest Watch, a near-real-time forest monitoring system. GFW uses data from satellites and elsewhere to inform forest conservation initiatives and reporting worldwide. Davis shares…
Tech solutions for conservation and a chat with Harvard researchers
Apr 4, 2017 • 52 min
During this episode we speak with Sue Palminteri, editor of Mongabay’s WildTech site which highlights high- and low-tech solutions to challenges in conservation. She shares with us some of the most interesting technologies and…
Musician Paul Simon discusses his new environmental concert tour
Mar 21, 2017 • 54 min
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we’re thrilled to feature a conversation with the one and only Paul Simon, who announced a tour in support of the environment. The 12-time Grammy-winning musician discussed his 17-date US concert tour and shared…
Almost Famous Animals - plus the songs of galagos
Mar 7, 2017 • 44 min
On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we welcome contributing editor Glenn Scherer to the program, who is responsible for Mongabay’s “Almost Famous Animals” series, which just wrapped up its second year with a focus on little-known Asian…
Author and climate historian Naomi Oreskes on why scientists should speak out
Feb 21, 2017 • 58 min
With so much uncertainty around the new Trump Administration’s environmental priorities, especially its energy and climate policies, this episode is dedicated to trying to answer some of the biggest questions. We welcome three guests:…
Reporter Sue Branford on journalism from the Amazon that makes a difference
Feb 7, 2017 • 40 min
This week we speak with journalist Sue Branford, a regular contributor to Mongabay who has been reporting from Brazil since 1979 for the BBC and others. Branford is one of the writers behind a hard-hitting new series in English and Portuguese that…
E.O. Wilson talks about global biodiversity, Trump, Half-Earth, and hope
Jan 24, 2017 • 40 min
On this episode, we feature a conversation with famed biologist E.O. Wilson, one of the greatest scientists of the last 100 years, who was interviewed by Mongabay senior correspondent Jeremy Hance about the Half Earth biodiversity initiative, the Trump…
Yaks, curassows, and other cool species overlooked by conservation efforts
Jan 10, 2017 • 41 min
This week we’re joined by Joel Berger, a professor at Colorado State University and a senior scientist with the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, who recently wrote a commentary for Mongabay arguing that there are too many…
Top new species discoveries of 2016, and how fig trees can save rainforests
Dec 27, 2016 • 24 min
This being the last Mongabay Newscast of 2016, we’re bringing you the top new species discoveries of the year. Here at Mongabay we report on a lot of environmental science and conservation news. It’s not always the most cheery subject matter,…
Undiscovered Sumatran rhinos in the wilds of Malaysia? Maybe, or maybe not.
Dec 13, 2016 • 51 min
On episode seven of the Newscast we talk with Mongabay contributing editor for Southeast Asia Isabel Esterman, who is based in Cairo, Egypt, about the plight of Asian rhinos. Potential new evidence recently emerged that suggests there might be some…
Carl Safina discusses marine conservation under a Trump administration, and Rhett Butler shares the origins of Mongabay
Nov 29, 2016 • 36 min
Noted ecologist and author Carl Safina appears on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast to discuss the current state of marine conservation and its future under the Trump presidency. His latest book is “Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel,”…
Report from the Climate Talks in Marrakesh and Salamander Conservation in Michoacan, Mexico
Nov 15, 2016 • 26 min
On this week’s Newscast we hear from writer Justin Catanoso who’s at the COP22 climate talks in Marrakech, Morocco filing reports for Mongabay.com. He shares his latest observations from this important UN conference and the mood of the delegates…
Andrea Crosta of Elephant Action League on “The Ivory Game” and orangutans under threat in Indonesia
Nov 1, 2016 • 36 min
Andrea Crosta of the Elephant Action League (EAL), one of the stars of the new Netflix documentary The Ivory Game, discusses how Chinese demand is driving the multi-billion dollar trade in ivory, as well as EAL’s project WildLeaks and the…
Crucial conservation votes at CITES and the future of socio-ecological research
Oct 18, 2016 • 32 min
Mongabay’s India-based staff writer Shreya Dasgupta appears on this episode of the Newscast to discuss key votes held at the seventeenth congress of the parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, also known as CITES…
The Mekong, Earth’s most climate-sensitive river delta, plus conservation in conflict zones
Oct 4, 2016 • 27 min
Newscast Episode #2
Mongabay Newscast #1: Panama’s Barro Blanco Dam
Sep 16, 2016 • 20 min
Editor Rebecca Kessler on the environmental impacts of Panama’s Barro Blanco Dam