Getty Art + Ideas

Getty Art + Ideas

blogs.getty.edu/podcast
Join Jim Cuno, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, as he talks with artists, writers, curators, and scholars about their work. Listen in as he engages these important thinkers in reflective and critical conversations about architecture, archaeology, art


Pierre Koenig’s Modernist LA Homes
Jul 10 • 38 min
Mid-twentieth century Los Angeles architect Pierre Koenig (1925–2004), was a skillful constructor of modernist homes. The most famous of these were two case study houses produced wholly of glass, wood, and steel and evocatively photographed by Julius…
The Lives of Velázquez
Jun 26 • 50 min
The painter Diego Velázquez (1599–1660), commonly known as Velázquez, was an immensely talented painter who achieved great prominence during Spain’s Golden Age of art and literature. Las Meninas (1656), his most well-known painting, is a complex portrait…
Real and Fantastical Beasts from the Medieval World to Contemporary Art
Jun 12 • 49 min
The bestiary, a medieval book of animals both real and imagined, was one of the most popular books in medieval Europe. Detailed illustrations and descriptions of real yet unfamiliar animals like whales and elephants shared the page with those of imaginary…
Talking Art History with Getty Research Institute Director Mary Miller
May 29 • 44 min
How has the field of art history changed in the last 30 years? This episode centers on this question through a discussion with Mary Miller, the recently appointed director of the Getty Research Institute. She describes her academic career studying the art…
An American Odyssey: Mary Schmidt Campbell on Artist Romare Bearden
May 15 • 55 min
With an artistic career that began with political cartoons in his college newspaper, Romare Bearden moved between mediums and styles throughout his life, although his artistic breakthroughs did not come without hard work. Over the course of a long career…
The Provocative Anti-Establishment Anti-Art of Fluxus
May 1 • 54 min
How is dripping water into a vessel a musical performance? Or the release of a butterfly into a space? Or washing one’s face? These three events are all proposed in scores created by Fluxus artists, an international, anti-art community of composers,…
Thelma Golden on the Past and Future of the Studio Museum in Harlem
Apr 17 • 45 min
Founded during the tumultuous year of 1968, the Studio Museum in Harlem recently celebrated its 50th year of showcasing the work of artists of African descent. In this episode, Thelma Golden, director and chief curator of the Studio Museum, discusses the…
New Insights into Jacopo da Pontormo’s Style with Curator Davide Gasparotto
Apr 3 • 44 min
Florence in the late 1520s was a place of turmoil, as powerful families vied for political and economic control of the city. Throughout the unrest, painter Jacopo da Pontormo continued to paint captivating works of art, including the Portrait of Carlo…
How Photographer Carleton Watkins Chronicled the West
Mar 20 • 52 min
Nineteenth-century photographer Carleton Watkins is perhaps best known for his photographs of Yosemite, which inspired the preservation of this land and, later, the creation of the National Parks system in the United States. But his unusual life and…
The Unusual Life of Photographer Julia Margaret Cameron
Mar 6 • 42 min
Although 19th century photographer Julia Margaret Cameron did not pick up her first camera until the age of 49, the artistically composed and printed images she made during her short career were both groundbreaking for their time and an inspiration to…
Thomas Hines on Arthur Drexler and MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design
Feb 20 • 46 min
When Arthur Drexler retired in 1986 from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, he was the longest-serving curator and department head in the history of the Museum, a distinction he holds to this day. Hired in 1951 by Philip Johnson, the first director of…
Artist Tacita Dean and her Many Mediums
Feb 6 • 55 min
Contemporary artist Tacita Dean works in many mediums to create a varied and compelling body of work, from collections of four-leaf clovers to chalk drawings to filmed portraits of artists. In 2018, a wide array of these works was on view during three…
Rerelease: Jackson Pollock’s Mural, part 1
Jan 23 • 29 min
Jackson Pollock’s Mural (1943) is a monumental eight-by-twenty foot work that marks a turning point in the artist’s career and in the course of American art. In 2012, Mural traveled to the Getty for conservation, cleaning, and study, which revealed…
Rerelease: Nancy Perloff on Russian Futurist Book Art
Jan 23 • 30 min
Between 1910 and 1915, Russian painters and poets invented an experimental language called zaum, which emphasizes sound and is characterized by indeterminacy in meaning. These artists used zaum to create handmade artists’ books that are meant to be read,…
Rerelease: Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles, Part 1
Jan 9 • 29 min
In 1947, Frank Gehry boarded a train in Toronto bound for Los Angeles, his uncle picked him up from Union Station, and the rest, as they say, is history. In the first installment of a four-part series, Gehry shares stories from his first years in Los…
Rerelease: Émile Zola’s Biography of Édouard Manet
Jan 9 • 27 min
In this episode, curator Scott Allan discusses a biography of Édouard Manet written by author and art critic Émile Zola. Édouard Manet was controversial during his lifetime, and the account discussed here, written by a critic and novelist he knew well,…
Preserving and Conserving Gunpowder in the Art of Cai Guo-Qiang
Dec 12, 2018 • 47 min
Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang has spent decades using gunpowder as a medium for paintings and performances. Although the explosions are momentary and ephemeral, the records of these events are works of art collected by museums around the world. When Cai…
Contextualizing the Nude in Renaissance Painting, Sculpture, and Drawing
Nov 28, 2018 • 44 min
The nude human figure, both male and female, has been central to European art for centuries. During the Renaissance of the 1400s and 1500s, artists across Europe used the nude to explore religion, nature, human relationships, and beauty itself. But…
The Salk Institute Part 2: Conservation for the Future
Nov 14, 2018 • 55 min
The Salk Institute opened in La Jolla, California, in 1963, with striking buildings of concrete and earthy wood lining a travertine plaza and overlooking the Pacific Ocean. But within a few years, the buildings began to weather badly, causing unsightly…
The Salk Institute Part 1: Founding and Forming
Oct 31, 2018 • 57 min
Shortly after inventing the polio vaccine, scientist Jonas Salk set his sights on another groundbreaking undertaking: creating an institute where science and art could meet and inform each other. In architect Louis Kahn, Salk found a man who not only…
India & the World with curator Naman Ahuja
Oct 17, 2018 • 56 min
The exhibition India & the World: A History in Nine Stories has an ambitious goal: to use objects to chronicle cultural, economic, and artistic exchange and influence between India and the world. From four-thousand-year-old seals from the Indus Valley…
Palmyra: Loss and Remembrance
Oct 3, 2018 • 65 min
During its heyday from the first to third centuries CE, the ancient city of Palmyra flourished as a crossroads of Eastern and Western people, goods, and cultures. The unique blend of Eastern and Western influence on Palmyrene society remains visible in…
Robert Polidori and the Getty Museum
Sep 19, 2018 • 33 min
Before the Getty Center opened to the public in 1997, photographer Robert Polidori captured the half-installed galleries and impressive architecture of the museum while on an assignment from The New Yorker. With brilliant colors and beautiful light, these…
Julien Stock on Discovering a New Michelangelo
Sep 5, 2018 • 39 min
In the late 1990s, Old Master drawings expert Julien Stock made an incredible discovery—a previously unknown Michelangelo drawing. Hiding in an unmarked book at England’s Castle Howard, the study of a mourning woman from early in Michelangelo’s career had…
The Lives of Vincent van Gogh and Édouard Manet
Aug 22, 2018 • 58 min
In this episode, curator Scott Allan discusses two artist biographies: one of Édouard Manet by author and art critic Émile Zola and the other of Vincent van Gogh written by his sister in law Jo van Gogh-Bonger. Both artists proved controversial or…
Lives of the Artists: Rilke on Rodin
Aug 8, 2018 • 45 min
In 1902, Austrian poet Rainer Maria Rilke visited sculptor August Rodin in Paris to write an essay on the artist for a new series of German monographs. Writing with his usual intensity, Rilke’s poetic language and passion for Rodin’s art make this an…
Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World
Jul 25, 2018 • 50 min
A towering sarcophagus for a man with a Grecian name, an ancient medical scroll that details Mycenaean cures in Egyptian hieroglyphics, and a Roman mosaic illustrating scenes from the Nile are just a few of the incredible objects that tell the story of…
Lives of the Artists: Three Biographies of Rembrandt
Jul 11, 2018 • 46 min
Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn was a well-known and somewhat controversial artist in his time, and many historians, critics, and artists wrote about his work and life during and shortly after his lifetime. In this episode, curator of paintings…
Lives of the Artists: Giorgio Vasari on Bellini, Raphael, and Michelangelo
Jun 27, 2018 • 45 min
Giorgio Vasari’s book Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects from Cimabue to Our Times, first published in 1550, is widely considered to be the ideological foundation of the discipline of art history. In this episode, senior…
Inside the Eames House with Eames Demetrios, Thomas Hines, and Susan Macdonald
Jun 13, 2018 • 56 min
The husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames produced some of the most iconic designs of the mid-twentieth century. This episode engages with a wide range of topics, from Charles and Ray’s training and inspiration, to their collaborative design…
Reims on Fire with Thomas Gaehtgens
May 30, 2018 • 53 min
How do we understand the seemingly senseless destruction of monuments during World War I? How does art history dovetail with military history? In this episode, Thomas Gaehtgens’ explores these questions through the lens of Reims Cathedral. He traces the…
Cultural Heritage in Armed Conflict Zones with Tom Weiss
May 16, 2018 • 44 min
Tom Weiss, a specialist on humanitarian intervention and the United Nations, believes we are at a watershed moment for international cooperation on the protection of cultural heritage. In this episode, Weiss uses the ongoing civil war in Syria as a…
Talking About Paintings: Caravaggio
May 2, 2018 • 20 min
The early Baroque artist Caravaggio painted bold compositions with dramatic lighting that emphasized the physical and emotional humanity of his subjects. In this episode, we listen as two curators, Davide Gasparotto and Keith Christiansen, visit the Getty…
Talking About Paintings: Giovanni Bellini
Apr 18, 2018 • 28 min
Venetian Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini is widely considered one of the greatest Italian artists of all time. His landscapes are imbued with allegory and a reverence for nature. In this episode, we listen as two curators, Davide Gasparotto and Keith…
Harald Szeemann’s Museum of Obsessions
Apr 4, 2018 • 67 min
To say that Swiss-born artist, art historian, and curator Harald Szeemann was an obsessive collector might be putting it mildly. Szeemann’s personal archive and research library, which he referred to as the “Museum of Obsessions,” spans over five decades…
Marie Svoboda on Egyptian Mummy Portraits
Mar 21, 2018 • 30 min
Egyptian mummy portraits are among the oldest paintings that have survived from the ancient world. Incorporated with the wrappings of mummies, these strikingly realistic portraits of the deceased reflect a blending of the artistic style of Greco-Roman…
B. V. Doshi – Modern Architecture in India [rebroadcast]
Mar 14, 2018 • 30 min
Last week, Indian architect, urban planner, and educator Balkrishna Doshi was selected as the 2018 Pritzker Architecture Prize laureate. In light of this news, we wanted to share an episode from earlier this year featuring an interview with Doshi. — While…
Getty at 20: Christopher Hawthorne
Mar 7, 2018 • 56 min
The Getty Center is a campus that features modernist buildings, beautiful gardens, open spaces, and panoramic views of Los Angeles. Christopher Hawthorne, architecture critic at the Los Angeles Times, discusses the relationship between Richard Meier’s…
Getty at 20: Stephen Rountree
Feb 21, 2018 • 63 min
Stephen Rountree served as the director of the Getty building program, working closely with architect Richard Meier, Getty staff and committees, and neighborhood councils during the construction of the center. In this episode, Rountree talks about the…
Stephanie Schrader on Rembrandt and India
Jan 24, 2018 • 23 min
Included in Rembrandt’s prolific body of work is a series of twenty-five drawings inspired by paintings created by Mughal artists in India. How did Rembrandt come across Mughal images? Why did he make these drawings? These questions are at the heart of an…
Werner Busch on Adolph Menzel
Jan 10, 2018 • 40 min
Adolph Menzel was a 19th-century pioneer of German realism. His paintings, drawings, and prints capture reality with remarkable truth and atmosphere. In this episode, art historian Werner Busch discusses why there has been so little published about this…
Interviewing Anselm Kiefer
Dec 13, 2017 • 25 min
In this episode, an interview with German painter and sculptor Anselm Kiefer doesn’t go as planned. But all is not lost. Despite—or perhaps as a consequence of—the disruptions, a candid and thoughtful conversation ensues. Kiefer’s work confronts…
Golden Kingdoms: Luxury Arts in the Ancient Americas
Nov 29, 2017 • 56 min
Gold nose adornments, feather paintings, and beaded shell collars. These are some of the objects featured in the Getty’s current exhibition, “Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas,” which traces the development of luxury arts in the…
The Making of an Exhibition Part 3
Nov 15, 2017 • 32 min
In September 2017 the Getty launched Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a regional exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. In a three-part series, we hear about the development of one of the Getty exhibitions that is part of…
Jerald Podair on Dodger Stadium and Los Angeles
Nov 1, 2017 • 41 min
The year 2017 marks the 60th anniversary of the Dodgers’ move from Brooklyn to Los Angeles, and the 55th anniversary of the opening of Dodger Stadium. Jerald Podair, author of “City of Dreams: Dodger Stadium and the Birth of Modern Los Angeles,” tells the…
Walter Hopps: The Dream Colony
Oct 18, 2017 • 53 min
Walter Hopps was a legendary curator of contemporary art who revolutionized the museum realm with radical exhibitions and an enduring support for contemporary art and artists. Published earlier this year, “The Dream Colony: A Life in Art,” is an…
In the Galleries: Borghese-Windsor Cabinet and Bust of Pope Paul V
Oct 4, 2017 • 46 min
In the galleries of the Getty Museum are two works of art with an interesting connection. The first, a magnificent cabinet with intricate stone inlay, gilded statuettes, and an array of compartments and hidden drawers. The second, a commanding portrait…
Anka Muhlstein on Artists and Authors in 19th-Century France
Sep 20, 2017 • 35 min
The close relationships between artists and authors in 19th-century France is evidenced in the illustrious novels of Honoré de Balzac, Émile Zola, Marcel Proust, J. K. Huysmans, and Guy de Maupassant. These novelists wrote about painting, created painters…
Jackson Pollock’s “Mural” Part 2
Sep 6, 2017 • 33 min
Although Jackson Pollock’s iconic “Mural” (1943) may appear to have been swiftly executed, close examination of the paint and archival photographs reveals otherwise. In the second half of a two-part conversation, Laura Rivers and Yvonne Szafran,…
Jackson Pollock’s “Mural” Part 1
Aug 23, 2017 • 40 min
Jackson Pollock’s “Mural” (1943) is a monumental eight-by-twenty foot work that marks a turning point in the artist’s career and the course of American art. In 2012, “Mural” traveled to the Getty for conservation, cleaning, and study, which revealed…
Chris Killip on Photographing People and Places
Aug 9, 2017 • 40 min
At age eighteen, Chris Killip saw an image by Henri Cartier-Bresson and decided to become a photographer. Killip, who grew up on the Isle of Man, documents social landscapes and is known for a series of powerful images of struggling industrial communities…
B. V. Doshi: Modern Architecture in India Part 2
Jul 26, 2017 • 30 min
While working in Chandigarh, Le Corbusier also developed projects in Ahmedabad, the former capital of Gujarat, 740 miles southeast of Chandigarh. In the second of a two-part series on modern architecture in India, we hear from B. V. Doshi, Le Corbusier’s…
Maristella Casciato: Modern Architecture in India Part 1
Jul 12, 2017 • 47 min
After the Partition of India in 1947, Indian prime minister Jawaharlal Nehru invited French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier to build Chandigarh, a new capital city that would be, in Nehru’s words, “symbolic of the freedom of India, unfettered by the…
Season 2 Trailer
Jul 5, 2017 • 2 min
Season 2 launches on July 12, 2017.
Jane and Louise Wilson on Creating Together
Jun 21, 2017 • 41 min
Microchip processing plants, space training centers, and abandoned bunkers. These are just a few of the subjects represented in the work of British artists and twin sisters Jane and Louise Wilson. The Wilsons create captivating and ethereal photographs,…
David Saunders on Museum Conservation and Lighting
Jun 7, 2017 • 44 min
Lighting in museums has long been a contentious subject among museum conservators. A gallery with too much light often causes long-term damage to artwork on display, while a gallery with too little light creates a poor experience for visitors. The balance…
Composer John Adams Part 2
May 24, 2017 • 43 min
In the second half of a two-part conversation, we hear from John Adams, composer of the Art + Ideas theme music, about key compositions throughout his career as well as upcoming work for the San Francisco Opera. Adams talks about his literary…
Composer John Adams Part 1
May 10, 2017 • 41 min
In the first half of a two-part conversation, we hear from John Adams, composer of the Art + Ideas theme music, about his early days and compositions. Adams talks about his childhood in New England, musical education, experiments in electronic music, and…
Mario Vargas Llosa on Culture
Apr 26, 2017 • 39 min
Peruvian-born writer Mario Vargas Llosa published a book titled “Notes on the Death of Culture: Essays on Spectacle and Society” in which he traces the development and what he sees as the decline of culture in modern society. In this episode, Vargas Llosa…
Nancy Perloff on Russian Futurist Book Art
Apr 12, 2017 • 41 min
Between 1910 and 1915, Russian painters and poets invented an experimental language called “zaum,” which emphasizes sound and is characterized by indeterminacy in meaning. These artists used “zaum” to create handmade artists’ books that are meant to be…
Kenneth Breisch on the Los Angeles Central Library
Mar 29, 2017 • 40 min
The Central Library in downtown Los Angeles is an iconic architectural landmark with high open ceilings, remarkable murals, and a striking façade. Kenneth Breisch, author of “The Los Angeles Central Library: Building an Architectural Icon, 1872–1933,”…
Anne Woollett on “Rembrandt Laughing”
Mar 15, 2017 • 22 min
In 2007 an English family decided to sell a small painting in their collection: an image of a man laughing with a label featuring the name Rembrandt. The work was initially attributed to a contemporary of Rembrandt, but scholarly analysis and scientific…
David Brafman on Alchemy
Mar 1, 2017 • 37 min
Now recognized as the ancestor of modern chemistry, alchemy is a mysterious and often misunderstood blend of science, philosophy, and spirituality. Alchemists were notorious for making artificial gold, but their impact extended far beyond their desire for…
Sunil Khilnani on India’s History in Fifty Lives
Feb 15, 2017 • 63 min
“India’s history is a curiously unpeopled place. As usually told it has dynasties, epochs, religions, and castes—but not that many individuals,” Sunil Khilnani writes in his book “Incarnations: India in Fifty Lives.” In “Incarnations,” also released as a…
Scott Allan on Manet’s “Jeanne (Spring)”
Feb 1, 2017 • 23 min
At the Salon of 1882, just one year before his death, Édouard Manet exhibited a painting depicting the actress and model Jeanne Demarsy. This portrait of a chic young woman holding a parasol against a background of lush foliage is viewed as a testament to…
Beyond Boundaries: Visual Culture in the Provinces of Ancient Rome
Jan 18, 2017 • 45 min
The Roman Empire’s rich and multifaceted visual culture is a manifestation of the sprawling geography of its provinces. In 2011 through the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative, a group of twenty international scholars began a multi-year…
Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles Part 4
Jan 4, 2017 • 44 min
In a four-part series, we’ll explore architect Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles and how his practice has evolved during his seventy years as an Angeleno. In this last conversation of the series, Gehry talks about projects, past and present, in three cities:…
Giovanni di Paolo’s Branchini Altarpiece
Dec 14, 2016 • 36 min
In 1427 Renaissance manuscript illuminator and panel painter Giovanni di Paolo completed one of his most important commissions: an altarpiece for the Branchini family chapel in the church of San Domenico in Siena, Italy. The polyptych was disbanded,…
Walter Grasskamp on André Malraux
Nov 30, 2016 • 49 min
André Malraux, the French novelist, minister of cultural affairs, and art theorist, published his seminal book “Le Musée imaginaire” in the early 1950s. In “The Book on the Floor: André Malraux and the Imaginary Museum,” art historian Walter Grasskamp…
The Making of an Exhibition Part 2
Nov 16, 2016 • 33 min
In Fall 2017, the Getty will present Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a regional exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. In a three-part series, we hear about the development of one of the Getty exhibitions that is part of…
Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles Part 3
Nov 2, 2016 • 44 min
In a four-part series, we’ll explore architect Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles and how his practice has evolved during his seventy years as an Angeleno. The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao are iconic buildings that…
The Getty Bronze
Oct 19, 2016 • 43 min
In the early 1960s, Italian fisherman found a remarkable bronze sculpture in the depths of the Adriatic Sea. Statue of a Victorious Youth, also referred to as the “Getty Bronze,” is one of the few life-size Greek bronzes to have survived its time,…
The Making of an Exhibition Part 1
Oct 5, 2016 • 44 min
In Fall 2017, the Getty will present Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a regional exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. In a three-part series, we hear about the development of one of the Getty exhibitions that is part of…
Lee Hendrix on “Noir”
Sep 21, 2016 • 56 min
Technological advances in mid-19th century France saw a proliferation of black drawing media, which gave rise to unprecedented experimentation in drawing and printmaking. This episode explores the Getty exhibition “Noir: The Romance of Black in…
Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles Part 2
Sep 7, 2016 • 70 min
In a four-part series, we’ll explore architect Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles and how his practice has evolved during his seventy years as an Angeleno. We continue our conversation by delving into hallmark projects from the 1970s and ‘80s, including Gehry’s…
Cave Temples of Dunhuang
Aug 31, 2016 • 57 min
The Mogao Grottoes are a series of 492 caves carved into a cliff face near the city of Dunhuang, a central stop along the fabled Silk Road in northwestern China. Since 1989, the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) and the Dunhuang Academy have worked…
Valerie Hansen on the Silk Road and Dunhuang
Aug 24, 2016 • 49 min
Through remarkable archaeological excavations, Valerie Hansen, author of “The Silk Road: A New History,” pieces together the dynamic and complicated history of the Silk Road. Hansen discusses the impact of micro exchanges along these prolific trade…
David Tudor at the Getty Research Institute
Aug 10, 2016 • 45 min
David Tudor (1926–1996) was an American pianist and composer of experimental music who was a leading interpreter of piano compositions by John Cage and musical director for the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Guided by Getty Research Institute (GRI)…
PS
Aug 10, 2016 • 0 min
We have an exclusive interview with a singer, poet, author, and artist whose work you probably know, but it’s only available online at www.getty.edu/ps.
India in the World – Postcard from India 3
Jul 27, 2016 • 50 min
How has Indian history been influenced by and in turn influenced civilizations around the globe? The Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum in Mumbai, India, is working with the British Museum on a sweeping exhibition called “India…
Hannah Rothschild – Postcard from India 2
Jul 27, 2016 • 23 min
If you spend your childhood visiting museums hoping that paintings could talk to you and tell you their secrets, and then if you grew up hearing stories about your family’s stolen art treasures, a fascinating story is bound to emerge. Author and filmmaker…
Sarah McPhee – Postcard from India 1
Jul 27, 2016 • 27 min
Little was known about the subject of Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s “Bust of Costanza Bonarelli“ until author and art historian Sarah McPhee started digging in the Roman archives. Through groundbreaking research, McPhee reveals the identity of Costanza, and…
Peter Frankopan on the Silk Roads
Jul 12, 2016 • 51 min
“Once upon a time, Europe wasn’t the center of anything,” Peter Frankopan contends, placing Central Asia and its prolific Silk Roads at the center of world development. Frankopan tells us how the Silk Roads were more than just ancient trade routes—they…
Edmund de Waal on The White Road
Jun 29, 2016 • 38 min
Edmund de Waal, potter and author, chats about the life, legacy, and lore of porcelain. He takes us to porcelain’s very beginnings in China, recounts its journey to Europe, layover in Tennessee, and expansion to the rest of the world. Edmund parallels…
T. J. Clark on Poussin
Jun 29, 2016 • 54 min
When art historian T. J. Clark visited the Getty Museum in 2000, he came upon a gallery that featured two paintings by seventeenth century French painter Nicolas Poussin (the National Gallery, London’s “Landscape with a Man Killed by a Snake” and the…
Helen Molesworth on Black Mountain College
Jun 29, 2016 • 42 min
It’s where John Cage staged his first Happening, Fridays were often dedicated to art classes, and all faculty, staff, and students participated in the college’s operations from farming to construction. Located in the mountains near Asheville, NC, Black…
Yve-Alain Bois on Ellsworth Kelly
Jun 29, 2016 • 37 min
“He was always about the particular. The completely particular. This particular shape, this particular form, this particular color…everything is completely unique and particular.” So says Yve-Alain Bois, art historian and professor of art history at the…
Colin Renfrew on a Life in Archaeology
Jun 29, 2016 • 37 min
Weekend bike trips to visit Medieval churches of southern England with his father; an excavation digging in Roman Canterbury at age fourteen. And so Colin Renfrew’s lifelong fascination with the past began. Renfrew talks about his life and career of…
Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles Part 1
Jun 29, 2016 • 69 min
In a four-part series, we’ll explore architect Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles and how his practice has evolved during his seventy years as an Angeleno. In 1947, Frank Gehry boarded a train in Toronto bound for Los Angeles, his uncle picked him up from Union…
Coming Soon: Art + Ideas
Jun 16, 2016 • 1 min
Here’s a sneak peek of Art + Ideas, a podcast in which Jim Cuno, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, talks with artists, writers, curators, and scholars about their work. The podcast launches on June 29, 2016. Stay tuned!